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Possible Duplicates:
Booleans, conditional operators and autoboxing
Java, Google Collections Library; problem with AbstractIterator?

The code below produces a NPE:

Integer test = null;
Integer test2 = true ? test : 0;
System.out.println(test2);

To correctly print out "null" without an exception requires this code:

Integer test = null;
Integer test2 = true ? test : (Integer)0;
System.out.println(test2);

It's obvious in the first example that "test" is being unboxed (converted to native int), but why? And why does changing the other expression in the ternary operator (as in the 2nd example) fix it? Can anyone provide some kind of narrative of exactly when, what, and why stuff in both of the examples gets boxed and unboxed?

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marked as duplicate by Tim Stone, Tom Hawtin - tackline, Matthew Flaschen, Eugene Yokota, ChrisF Oct 28 '10 at 17:59

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
    
Or [Java, Google Collections Library; problem with AbstractIterator? ](stackoverflow.com/questions/1821510/…), which is specifically about int. –  Matthew Flaschen Oct 28 '10 at 17:53
    
Still no one has answered (for this specific example) the order of when and what gets boxed and autoboxed. –  GreenieMeanie Oct 28 '10 at 18:06
    
in the first, test is unboxed because of binary numeric promotion between test and 0. In the second, the cast boxes 0. –  Matthew Flaschen Oct 28 '10 at 21:12

1 Answer 1

up vote 14 down vote accepted

From section 15.25 of the Java Language Specification:

The type of a conditional expression is determined as follows:

  • If the second and third operands have the same type (which may be the null type), then that is the type of the conditional expression.
    • If one of the second and third operands is of type boolean and the type of the other is of type Boolean, then the type of the conditional expression is boolean.
    • If one of the second and third operands is of the null type and the type of the other is a reference type, then the type of the conditional expression is that reference type.
    • Otherwise, if the second and third operands have types that are convertible (§5.1.8) to numeric types, then there are several cases:
      • If one of the operands is of type byte or Byte and the other is of type short or Short, then the type of the conditional expression is short.
      • If one of the operands is of type T where T is byte, short, or char, and the other operand is a constant expression of type int whose value is representable in type T, then the type of the conditional expression is T.
      • If one of the operands is of type Byte and the other operand is a constant expression of type int whose value is representable in type byte, then the type of the conditional expression is byte.
      • If one of the operands is of type Short and the other operand is a constant expression of type int whose value is representable in type short, then the type of the conditional expression is short.
      • If one of the operands is of type; Character and the other operand is a constant expression of type int whose value is representable in type char, then the type of the conditional expression is char.
      • Otherwise, binary numeric promotion (§5.6.2) is applied to the operand types, and the type of the conditional expression is the promoted type of the second and third operands. Note that binary numeric promotion performs unboxing conversion (§5.1.8) and value set conversion (§5.1.13).

So it's following the final bullet, performing binary numeric promotion, which performs an unboxing conversion. So the type of the conditional operator expression is int, even though you're assigning it to an Integer. It's trying to perform the unboxing conversion on null, hence the exception.

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