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I Want to optimize the following function using SIMD (SSE2 & such):

int64_t fun(int64_t N, int size, int* p)
{
    int64_t sum = 0;
    for(int i=1; i<size; i++)
       sum += (N/i)*p[i];
    return sum;
}

This seems like an eminently vectorizable task, except that the needed instructions just aren't there ...

We can assume that N is very large (10^12 to 10^18) and size~sqrt(N). We can also assume that p can only take values of -1, 0, and 1; so we don't need a real multiplication, the (N/i)*p[i] can be done with four instructions (pcmpgt, pxor, psub, pand), if we could just somehow compute N/i.

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1  
@user434507 I think you will get more responses if you don't sound so patronizing. –  srean Oct 28 '10 at 21:39
2  
@srean if you don't know how to solve it, just say so. :) –  user434507 Oct 28 '10 at 22:01
    
I don't really understand the SIMD constraint, but I understand some math. If it were i/3, could you do it? That is, if you needed to compute many different numbers, each divided by one constant, instead of the other way around, would that be parallelizable in the way you want? –  Josephine Oct 28 '10 at 23:30
    
The integer division feels like approximation. Is it alright if the computation of N/i estimated, and is therefore occasionally off by one or two units? Or does it have to be spot on? –  Josephine Oct 28 '10 at 23:39
1  
@user434507 Hahaha whatever rocks your boat man –  srean Oct 29 '10 at 2:21

4 Answers 4

I suggest you do this with floating point SIMD operations - either single or double precision depending on your accuracy requirements. Conversion from int to float or double is relatively fast using SSE.

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The use of floating point is problematic, because floating point SIMD operations have a 52-bit resolution and my N is potentially larger than that... –  user434507 Oct 29 '10 at 19:09
    
@user434507: it depends on what your accuracy requirements are - you haven't actually stated how much precision you need. Given that N/i is a truncating integer divide then it doesn't appear that you are overly concerned about absolute numerical precision in the result ? –  Paul R Oct 29 '10 at 20:55
    
I need the exact answer. –  user434507 Oct 31 '10 at 9:02
    
@user434507: in that case I would suggest calculating the first M terms using scalar code, until N/i becomes manageable using SIMD floating point. You could then process blocks of points and periodically update a scalar 64 bit integer sum after each block. –  Paul R Oct 31 '10 at 9:40

The cost is concentrated in computing the divisions. There is no opcode in SSE2 for integral divisions, so you would have to implement a division algorithm yourself, bit by bit. I do not think it would be worth the effort: SSE2 allow you to perform two instances in parallel (you use 64-bit numbers, and SSE2 registers are 128-bit) but I find it likely that a handmade division algorithm would be at least twice as slow as the CPU idiv opcode.

(By the way, do you compile in 32-bit or 64-bit mode ? The latter will be more comfortable with 64-bit integers.)

Reducing the overall number of divisions looks like a more promising way. One may note that for positive integers x and y, then floor(x/(2y)) = floor(floor(x/y)/2). In C terminology, once you have computed N/i (truncated division) then you just have to shift it right by one bit to obtain N/(2*i). Used properly, this makes half of your divisions almost free (that "properly" also includes accessing the billions of p[i] values in a way which does not wreak havoc with the caches, so it does not seem very easy).

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This is as close as I could get to vectorizing that code. I don't really expect it to be faster. I was just trying my hand at writting SIMD code.

#include <stdint.h>

int64_t fun(int64_t N, int size, const int* p)
{
    int64_t sum = 0;
    int i;
    for(i=1; i<size; i++) {
        sum += (N/i)*p[i];
    }
    return sum;
}

typedef int64_t v2sl __attribute__ ((vector_size (2*sizeof(int64_t))));

int64_t fun_simd(int64_t N, int size, const int* p)
{
    int64_t sum = 0;
    int i;
    v2sl v_2 = { 2, 2 };
    v2sl v_N = { N, N };
    v2sl v_i = { 1, 2 };
    union { v2sl v; int64_t a[2]; } v_sum;

    v_sum.a[0] = 0;
    v_sum.a[1] = 0;
    for(i=1; i<size-1; i+=2) {
        v2sl v_p = { p[i], p[i+1] };
        v_sum.v += (v_N / v_i) * v_p;
        v_i += v_2;
    }
    sum = v_sum.a[0] + v_sum.a[1];
    for(; i<size; i++) {
        sum += (N/i)*p[i];
    }
    return sum;
}

typedef double v2df __attribute__ ((vector_size (2*sizeof(double))));

int64_t fun_simd_double(int64_t N, int size, const int* p)
{
    int64_t sum = 0;
    int i;
    v2df v_2 = { 2, 2 };
    v2df v_N = { N, N };
    v2df v_i = { 1, 2 };
    union { v2df v; double a[2]; } v_sum;

    v_sum.a[0] = 0;
    v_sum.a[1] = 0;
    for(i=1; i<size-1; i+=2) {
        v2df v_p = { p[i], p[i+1] };
        v_sum.v += (v_N / v_i) * v_p;
        v_i += v_2;
    }
    sum = v_sum.a[0] + v_sum.a[1];
    for(; i<size; i++) {
        sum += (N/i)*p[i];
    }
    return sum;
}

#include <stdio.h>

static const int test_array[] = {
 1, 0, -1, 0, 1, 0, -1, 0, 1, 0, -1, 0, 1, 0, -1, 0,
 1, 0, -1, 0, 1, 0, -1, 0, 1, 0, -1, 0, 1, 0, -1, 0,
 1, 0, -1, 0, 1, 0, -1, 0, 1, 0, -1, 0, 1, 0, -1, 0,
 1, 0, -1, 0, 1, 0, -1, 0, 1, 0, -1, 0, 1, 0, -1, 0,
 1, 0, -1, 0, 1, 0, -1, 0, 1, 0, -1, 0, 1, 0, -1, 0,
 1, 0, -1, 0, 1, 0, -1, 0, 1, 0, -1, 0, 1, 0, -1, 0,
 1, 0, -1, 0, 1, 0, -1, 0, 1, 0, -1, 0, 1, 0, -1, 0,
 1, 0, -1, 0, 1, 0, -1, 0, 1, 0, -1, 0, 1, 0, -1, 0,
 1, 0, -1, 0, 1, 0, -1, 0, 1, 0, -1, 0, 1, 0, -1, 0,
 1, 0, -1, 0, 1, 0, -1, 0, 1, 0, -1, 0, 1, 0, -1, 0,
 1, 0, -1, 0, 1, 0, -1, 0, 1, 0, -1, 0, 1, 0, -1, 0,
 1, 0, -1, 0, 1, 0, -1, 0, 1, 0, -1, 0, 1, 0, -1, 0,
 1, 0, -1, 0, 1, 0, -1, 0, 1, 0, -1, 0, 1, 0, -1, 0,
 1, 0, -1, 0, 1, 0, -1, 0, 1, 0, -1, 0, 1, 0, -1, 0,
 1, 0, -1, 0, 1, 0, -1, 0, 1, 0, -1, 0, 1, 0, -1, 0,
 1, 0, -1, 0, 1, 0, -1, 0, 1, 0, -1, 0, 1, 0, -1, 0,
 1, 0, -1, 0, 1, 0, -1, 0, 1, 0, -1, 0, 1, 0, -1, 0,
 1, 0, -1, 0, 1, 0, -1, 0, 1, 0, -1, 0, 1, 0, -1, 0,
 1, 0, -1, 0, 1, 0, -1, 0, 1, 0, -1, 0, 1, 0, -1, 0,
 1, 0, -1, 0, 1, 0, -1, 0, 1, 0, -1, 0, 1, 0, -1, 0,
 1, 0, -1, 0, 1, 0, -1, 0, 1, 0, -1, 0, 1, 0, -1, 0
};
#define test_array_len (sizeof(test_array)/sizeof(int))

#define big_N (1024 * 1024 * 1024)

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
    int64_t res1;
    int64_t res2;
    int64_t res3;
    v2sl a = { 123, 456 };
    v2sl b = { 100, 200 };
    union { v2sl v; int64_t a[2]; } tmp;

    a = a + b;
    tmp.v = a;
    printf("a = { %ld, %ld }\n", tmp.a[0], tmp.a[1]);

    printf("test_array size = %zd\n", test_array_len);

    res1 = fun(big_N, test_array_len, test_array);
    printf("fun() = %ld\n", res1);

    res2 = fun_simd(big_N, test_array_len, test_array);
    printf("fun_simd() = %ld\n", res2);

    res3 = fun_simd_double(big_N, test_array_len, test_array);
    printf("fun_simd_double() = %ld\n", res3);

    return 0;
}
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The derivative of 1/x is -1/x^2, which means as x gets bigger, N/x==N/(x + 1).

For a known value of N/x (let's call that value r), we can determine the next value of x (let's call that value x' such that N/x'<r:

x'= N/(r - 1)

And since we are dealing with integers:

x'= ceiling(N/(r - 1))

So, the loop becomes something like this:

int64_t sum = 0;   
int i=1; 
int r= N;
while (i<size)
{
    int s= (N + r - 1 - 1)/(r - 1);

    while (i<s && i<size)
    {
        sum += (r)*p[i];
        ++i;
    }

    r= N/s;
}
return sum;   

For sufficiently large N, you will have many many runs of identical values for N/i. Granted, you will hit a divide by zero if you aren't careful.

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1  
This is a very astute observation, unfortunately, it does not help me because size ~ sqrt(N) and you don't get any duplicates until after that point. –  user434507 Nov 7 '10 at 9:00
1  
Heh, you are right. I never bothered to figure out "sufficiently large N". –  MSN Nov 8 '10 at 16:56

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