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I'm given some ISBN numbers e.g. 3-528-03851 (not valid) , 3-528-16419-0 (valid). I'm supposed to write a program which tests if the ISBN number is valid.

Here' my code:

def check(isbn):
    check_digit = int(isbn[-1])
    match = re.search(r'(\d)-(\d{3})-(\d{5})', isbn[:-1])

    if match:
        digits = match.group(1) + match.group(2) + match.group(3)
        result = 0

        for i, digit in enumerate(digits):
          result += (i + 1) * int(digit)

        return True if (result % 11) == check_digit else False

    return False

I've used a regular expression to check a) if the format is valid and b) extract the digits in the ISBN string. While it seems to work, being a Python beginner I'm eager to know how I could improve my code. Suggestions?

share|improve this question
    
Looks good to me. I like your use of slicing. As the other person noted, your ternary expression can be simplified just by returning (result %11) == check_digit –  I82Much Oct 28 '10 at 22:10
1  
You could also remove the blank likes, in accordance with PEP8 <python.org/dev/peps/pep-0008/>; –  Stefano Palazzo Oct 28 '10 at 22:15
6  
+1 for outstandingly working things out first and then still asking about improvement. Good job! –  dotalchemy Oct 28 '10 at 22:15
1  

9 Answers 9

up vote 14 down vote accepted

First, try to avoid code like this:

if Action():
    lots of code
    return True
return False

Flip it around, so the bulk of code isn't nested. This gives us:

def check(isbn):
    check_digit = int(isbn[-1])
    match = re.search(r'(\d)-(\d{3})-(\d{5})', isbn[:-1])

    if not match:
        return False

    digits = match.group(1) + match.group(2) + match.group(3)
    result = 0

    for i, digit in enumerate(digits):
      result += (i + 1) * int(digit)

    return True if (result % 11) == check_digit else False

There are some bugs in the code:

  • If the check digit isn't an integer, this will raise ValueError instead of returning False: "0-123-12345-Q".
  • If the check digit is 10 ("X"), this will raise ValueError instead of returning True.
  • This assumes that the ISBN is always grouped as "1-123-12345-1". That's not the case; ISBNs are grouped arbitrarily. For example, the grouping "12-12345-12-1" is valid. See http://www.isbn.org/standards/home/isbn/international/html/usm4.htm.
  • This assumes the ISBN is grouped by hyphens. Spaces are also valid.
  • It doesn't check that there are no extra characters; '0-123-4567819' returns True, ignoring the extra 1 at the end.

So, let's simplify this. First, remove all spaces and hyphens, and make sure the regex matches the whole line by bracing it in '^...$'. That makes sure it rejects strings which are too long.

def check(isbn):
    isbn = isbn.replace("-", "").replace(" ", "");
    check_digit = int(isbn[-1])
    match = re.search(r'^(\d{9})$', isbn[:-1])
    if not match:
        return False

    digits = match.group(1)

    result = 0
    for i, digit in enumerate(digits):
      result += (i + 1) * int(digit)

    return True if (result % 11) == check_digit else False

Next, let's fix the "X" check digit problem. Match the check digit in the regex as well, so the entire string is validated by the regex, then convert the check digit correctly.

def check(isbn):
    isbn = isbn.replace("-", "").replace(" ", "").upper();
    match = re.search(r'^(\d{9})(\d|X)$', isbn)
    if not match:
        return False

    digits = match.group(1)
    check_digit = 10 if match.group(2) == 'X' else int(match.group(2))

    result = 0
    for i, digit in enumerate(digits):
      result += (i + 1) * int(digit)

    return True if (result % 11) == check_digit else False

Finally, using a generator expression and max is a more idiomatic way of doing the final calculation in Python, and the final conditional can be simplified.

def check(isbn):
    isbn = isbn.replace("-", "").replace(" ", "").upper();
    match = re.search(r'^(\d{9})(\d|X)$', isbn)
    if not match:
        return False

    digits = match.group(1)
    check_digit = 10 if match.group(2) == 'X' else int(match.group(2))

    result = sum((i + 1) * int(digit) for i, digit in enumerate(digits))
    return (result % 11) == check_digit
share|improve this answer
2  
Nicely done. The only flaw I see is that consecutive hyphens or spaces are allowed, they should probably be flagged as an error. –  Mark Ransom Oct 28 '10 at 22:47
1  
"If the check digit is 11 ("X") : Do you mean 10? Also, you said you are using max, but I think you meant sum. :::Hesitant to edit other people's posts without 100% certainty::: Also, there's another bug. ISBN's are not grouped fully arbitrarily. The link you pointed to states that there are always 4 groups. Also, the 4th group is always 1 character in length. –  Brian Oct 28 '10 at 23:44
    
@Brian: It's valid to not hyphenate at all, eg. when typing an ISBN off of a barcode. There are also lots of other rules that you could validate if you wanted. For example, the grouping isn't arbitrary. Generally this doesn't matter when inputting an ISBN, though; you're really just checking for typos, and in any case it's beyond the scope of an intro-to-programming assignment. It's worth noting, though. –  Glenn Maynard Oct 29 '10 at 0:33
    
Yes, I know. My point was that it is not valid to have 4 or more hyphens. –  Brian Oct 29 '10 at 3:57
    
@Brian: And my point is that there are lots of other validations that you could do. –  Glenn Maynard Oct 29 '10 at 4:17

Pointless improvement: replace return True if (result % 11) == check_digit else False with return (result % 11) == check_digit

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the hint. After 4 years of programming, I should know better. But then again, it's late, and I've run out of coffee :-). –  helpermethod Oct 28 '10 at 22:14

check this after you have finished ok :)

http://www.staff.ncl.ac.uk/d.j.wilkinson/software/isbn.py

and

http://chrisrbennett.com/2006/11/isbn-check-methods.html

EDIT : Sorry about the confusing i didn't see the homework tag but maybe after finishing your homework you can see what other have done before, i think you can learn a lot from others code ; sorry again :(

share|improve this answer
1  
The first thing to do when writing homework is to see if there's something you can copy? Seriously? –  Glenn Maynard Oct 28 '10 at 22:13
    
I think that utterly destroys the point of his homework, which I would suggest leans more towards learning than Google searching –  dotalchemy Oct 28 '10 at 22:14
    
While I generally would agree, the idea of the homework was to apply the algorithm we did on paper. Should have mentioned it in my question. –  helpermethod Oct 28 '10 at 22:15
    
Ooops i didn't see the homework tags sorry !!! –  mouad Oct 28 '10 at 22:16
    
I tried many of the solutions listed above yours and none worked with all the ISBN's I have in my testcase. Yours worked so I gave you a thumbs up! TY. –  Gattster Oct 31 '10 at 22:08
  • The check_digit initialization can raise a ValueError if the last character isn't a decimal digit. Why not pull out the check digit with your regex instead of using slicing?
  • Instead of search, you should probably use match, unless you want to allow arbitrary junk as the prefix. (Also, as a rule of thumb I'd anchor the end with $, though in your case that won't matter as your regex is fixed-width.)
  • Instead of manually listing the groups, you could just use ''.join(match.groups()), and pull the check_digit out afterwards. You might as well do the conversion to ints before pulling it out, as you want to convert all of them to ints anyway.
  • your for loop could be replaced by a list/generator comprehension. Just use sum() to add up the elements.
  • True if (expression) else False can generally be replaced with simply expression. Likewise, False if (expression) else True can always be replaced with simply not expression

Putting that all together:

def check(isbn):
    match = re.match(r'(\d)-(\d{3})-(\d{5})-(\d)$', isbn)
    if match:
        digits = [int(x) for x in ''.join(match.groups())]
        check_digit = digits.pop()
        return check_digit == sum([(i + 1) * digit
                                  for i, digit in enumerate(digits)]) % 11
    return False

The last line is arguably unnecessary, as the default behavior would be to return None (which is falsy), but explicit returns from some paths and not from others looks like a bug to me, so I think it's more readable to leave it in.

share|improve this answer

All that regex stuff is great if you belong to the isbn.org compliance inspectorate.

However, if you want to know if what the potential customers type into their browser is worth pushing into a query of your database of books for sale, you don't want all that nice red uniform caper. Simply throw away everything but 0-9 and X ... oh yeah nobody uses the shift key so we'd better allow x as well. Then if it's length 10 and passes the check-digit test, it's worth doing the query.

From http://www.isbn.org/standards/home/isbn/international/html/usm4.htm

The check digit is the last digit of an ISBN. It is calculated on a modulus 11 with weights 10-2, using X in lieu of 10 where ten would occur as a check digit.

This means that each of the first nine digits of the ISBN -- excluding the check digit itself -- is multiplied by a number ranging from 10 to 2 and that the resulting sum of the products, plus the check digit, must be divisible by 11 without a remainder.

which is a very long-winded way of saying "each of all the digits is multiplied by a number ranging from 10 to 1 and that the resulting sum of the products must be divisible by 11 without a remainder"

def isbn10_ok(s):
    data = [c for c in s if c in '0123456789Xx']
    if len(data) != 10: return False
    if data[-1] in 'Xx': data[-1] = 10
    try:
        return not sum((10 - i) * int(x) for i, x in enumerate(data)) % 11
    except ValueError:
        # rare case: 'X' or 'x' in first 9 "digits"
        return False


tests = """\
    3-528-03851
    3-528-16419-0
    ISBN 0-8436-1072-7
    0864425244
    1864425244
    0864X25244
    1 904310 16 8
    0-473-07480-x
    0-473-07480-X
    0-473-07480-9
    0-473-07480-0
    123456789
    12345678901
    1234567890
    0000000000
    """.splitlines()

for test in tests:
    test = test.strip()
    print repr(test), isbn10_ok(test)

Output:

'3-528-03851' False
'3-528-16419-0' True
'ISBN 0-8436-1072-7' True
'0864425244' True
'1864425244' False
'0864X25244' False
'1 904310 16 8' True
'0-473-07480-x' True
'0-473-07480-X' True
'0-473-07480-9' False
'0-473-07480-0' False
'123456789' False
'12345678901' False
'1234567890' False
'0000000000' True
'' False

Aside: a large well-known bookselling site will accept 047307480x, 047307480X, and 0-473-07480-X but not 0-473-07480-x :-O

share|improve this answer

Don't forget (though this may be outside of the scope of your assignment) to calculate the check digit of the ISBN (the final digit), to determine if the ISBN is valid and not just seemingly valid.

There's some information about the implementation of the check digit on the ISBN.org website, and implementation should be fairly straightforward. Wikipedia offers one such example (presuming you've already converted any ASCII "X" to a decimal 10):

bool is_isbn_valid(char digits[10]) {
    int i, a = 0, b = 0;
    for (i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
        a += digits[i];  // Assumed already converted from ASCII to 0..10
        b += a;
    }
    return b % 11 == 0;
}

Applying this for your assignment is left, well, as an exercise for you.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Thanks, totally forgotten that. –  helpermethod Oct 28 '10 at 22:22
1  
If you do look up any more info on check digits, just be sure to look up ISBN-10, not ISBN-13, as the check digit methods do differ (naturally). Alternatively, be even more impressive with your assignment, and handle both cases automatically and return if it's valid ISBN-10, ISBN-13 or invalid! –  James Burgess Oct 28 '10 at 22:25
    
Nice idea, I probably do that ^^. –  helpermethod Oct 28 '10 at 22:36

Your code is nice -- well done for writing idiomatic Python! Here are some minor things:


When you see the idiom

result = <initiator>
for elt in <iterable>:
    result += elt

you can replace it by a list comprehension. In this case:

result = sum((i+1)*int(digit) for i, digit in enumerate(digits)

or even more concisely:

return sum((i+1)*int(digit) for i, digit in enumerate(digits) % 11 == check_digit

Of course, it is a value judgement whether this is better than the original. I would personally consider the second of these to be best.

Also, the extra parentheses in (result % 11) == check_digit are extraneous and I don't really think you need them for clarity. That leaves you overall with:

def validate(isbn):
    check_digit = int(isbn[-1])
    match = re.search(r'(\d)-(\d{3})-(\d{5})', isbn[:-1])

    if match:
        digits = match.group(1) + match.group(2) + match.group(3)
        parity = sum((i+1)*int(digit) for i, digit in enumerate(digits)
        return parity % 11 == check_digit
    else:
        return False

Note that you do still need the return False to catch the case that the ISBN is not even in the right format.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Very elegant solution! –  helpermethod Oct 28 '10 at 22:25
    
Which type of exception could I raise if the format of the string does not match? –  helpermethod Oct 28 '10 at 22:37
2  
Not sure an exception is the way to go here; when writing a validate method it is not exceptional to have an invalid argument. –  katrielalex Oct 28 '10 at 22:45
    
I think some of your calls to sum are missing a closing parenthesis. –  Brian Oct 28 '10 at 22:54
    
Omg your are 19y old! I wish I'd program that well at this age! –  helpermethod Oct 29 '10 at 10:54

Your check digit can take on the values 0-10, based on the fact that it's modulo-11. There's a problem with the line:

    check_digit = int(isbn[-1]) 

as this works only for the digits 0-9. You'll need something for the case when the digit is 'X', and also for the error condition when it isn't any of the above - otherwise your program will crash.

share|improve this answer

Maybe this link will help

Helped me with check digit calculation for Dimep Time Clock barcode validation.

share|improve this answer
    
consider posting the content from external pages. links don't live forever –  benka Jan 7 at 10:08
    
You should at least summarize the content of the linked article. –  MartinStettner Jan 7 at 10:12

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