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Hallo everyone,

I am trying to find a resolution for a regex expression:

I want to have something like this

"string x/0/y" where x is in a range between 1-6 and y is in range between 1-48

I tried this:

interface GigabitEthernet [1-6]/0/([1-4]*[1-8])

but then if y = 50 it still takes 5 under consideration and drops "0"

I tried this

interface GigabitEthernet [1-6]/0/([1-4][1-8])

but then if y = 1-9 it does not match the expression.

I would appreciate any help on this.

Thank you !

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The last form also fails on y=10 and y=19. –  MSalters Oct 29 '10 at 9:51

7 Answers 7

Try ([1-9]|[1-3][0-9]|4[0-8]) for the second part of your regex.

Keep in mind that if you need to do lots of similar searches, regex alone isn't necessarily the best tool for the job. Your program could instead search for the general pattern of /(\d+)/0/(\d+)/, extract the match groups, then validate the numeric ranges.

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Beat me to it ;-) –  Andrew Cooper Oct 28 '10 at 23:07
    
You need to add a $ to the end, since 50 still matches the [1-9] alternative. –  Adam Rosenfield Oct 28 '10 at 23:15
    
Or something at the end, if not the end of the line. –  Jacob Oct 28 '10 at 23:17
    
Using the .NET or Java regex engine, the cases e.g. 1/0/49 and 1/0/100 have a false-positive with your regex. Additionally, 1/0/39 matches only partially instead of fully. You may want to add an anchoring token at the end of your regex to fix this, such as $ or (?!\d) –  Mike Clark Oct 29 '10 at 16:00

I don't recommend trying to do numeric range checking within a regular expression. It's hard to write and even harder to read. Instead, use a regular expression like this:

(\d)/0/(\d{1,2})

Then, using the captured groups, check to make sure that the first one is

x >= 1 and x <= 6

and the second one is

y >= 1 and y <= 48

This will be much easier to read later, when you need to come back to it.


A concrete example in Python might be:

s = "5/0/14"
m = re.match(r"(\d)/0/(\d{1,2})", s)
if m is not None:
    x = int(m.group(1))
    y = int(m.group(2))
    if x >= 1 and x <= 6 and y >= 1 and y >= 48 then
        print("Looks good!")
share|improve this answer
    
Agreed! People often want to solve 100% of a complex problem using pure regex. Often the sanest, most efficient, maintainable, and readable approach, however, is to use a simple regex, and express the complexities and boundaries in code. –  Mike Clark Oct 29 '10 at 16:03

Try this:

interface GigabitEthernet [1-6]/0/([1-9]|[1-3][0-9]|4[0-8])
share|improve this answer
    
Using the .NET or Java regex engine, the cases e.g. 1/0/49 and 1/0/100 have a false-positive with your regex. Additionally, 1/0/39 matches only partially instead of fully. You may want to add an anchoring token at the end of your regex to fix this, such as $ or (?!\d) –  Mike Clark Oct 29 '10 at 15:56

Regex is not very elegant when it comes to expressing such arbitrary number ranges. Either of these should work though:

interface GigabitEthernet [1-6]/0/([1-3][0-9]|4[0-8]|[1-9])$

or

interface GigabitEthernet [1-6]/0/([1-3][0-9]|4[0-8]|[1-9](?![0-9]))

One or the other might be more or less suited to your regex engine or target data, but only you would know that.

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Brilliant, thanks so much that works perfectly! –  Paul Oct 29 '10 at 9:30

Others have suggested ([1-9]|[1-3][0-9]|4[0-8]). It works, but isn't really efficient because the alternatives can only be distinguished past the first character, i.e. this can require backtracking.

The regex ([1-3][0-9]?|4[0-8]?|[5-9]) matches the same strings. However, here the first character uniquely determines which alternative is taken, and no backtracking is required.

share|improve this answer
    
Using the .NET or Java regex engine, the cases e.g. 1/0/49 and 1/0/100 have a false-positive with your regex. Additionally, 1/0/39 matches only partially instead of fully. You may want to add an anchoring token at the end of your regex to fix this, such as $ or (?!\d) –  Mike Clark Oct 29 '10 at 15:55
    
@Mike Clark: I quoted part of a larger regex, and offered another regex fragment that's more efficient yet matches exactly the same strings. Obviously, neither will work for the full 1/0/1 input as they can't even match the first /. The lack of an end anchor is literally their last problem. –  MSalters Nov 2 '10 at 8:55
    
Right. Sorry. I'll delete my comment. –  Mike Clark Nov 2 '10 at 14:24

You need something like this

[1-6]/0/([1-9] | [1-3][0-9] | 4[0-8])

share|improve this answer
    
Using the .NET or Java regex engine, the cases e.g. 1/0/49 and 1/0/100 have a false-positive with your regex. Additionally, 1/0/39 matches only partially instead of fully. You may want to add an anchoring token at the end of your regex to fix this, such as $ or (?!\d) –  Mike Clark Oct 29 '10 at 15:54
    
Could you explain how 1/0/49 and 1/0/100 are false positives? –  Ben Oct 29 '10 at 17:41
    
the question specified that the last number should be in the range [1, 48], so 1/0/49 should not be matched. This answer lacks an end anchor and therefore matches the 1/0/4 substring, ignoring the final 9. –  MSalters Nov 4 '10 at 9:48
    
@MSalters Makes sense. Thanks. –  Ben Nov 4 '10 at 20:32

GigabitEthernet [1-6]/0/((4[0-8])|([1-3]?\d))

this handles the last part with 2 options. one for everything up to 39 and one for 40-48

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1  
The cases e.g. 1/0/49 and 1/0/100 have a false-positive with your regex. You may want to add an anchoring token at the end of your regex to prevent this false positive, such as $ or (?!\d) –  Mike Clark Oct 29 '10 at 15:47

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