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I always thought Java was pass-by-reference; however I've seen a couple of blog posts (for example, this blog) that claim it's not. I don't think I understand the distinction they're making.

What is the explanation?

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362  
I believe that much of the confusion on this issue has to do with the fact that different people have different definitions of the term "reference". People coming from a C++ background assume that "reference" must mean what it meant in C++, people from a C background assume "reference" must be the same as "pointer" in their language, and so on. Whether it's correct to say that Java passes by reference really depends on what's meant by "reference". – Gravity Jul 30 '11 at 7:23
59  
I try to consistently use the terminology found at the Evaluation Strategy article. It should be noted that, even though the article points out the terms vary greatly by community, it stresses that the semantics for call-by-value and call-by-reference differ in a very crucial way. (Personally I prefer to use call-by-object-sharing these days over call-by-value[-of-the-reference], as this describes the semantics at a high-level and does not create a conflict with call-by-value, which is the underlying implementation.) – user166390 Dec 15 '11 at 6:12
17  
@Gravity: Can you go and put your comment on a HUGE billboard or something? That's the whole issue in a nutshell. And it shows that this whole thing is semantics. If we don't agree on the base definition of a reference, then we won't agree on the answer to this question :) – MadConan Nov 12 '13 at 20:58
11  
I would rather ask if values passed to methods are copied at time of invocation. I guess that this is the question you are looking for. – spectre Dec 28 '13 at 12:56
9  
I think the confusion is "pass by reference" versus "reference semantics". Java is pass-by-value with reference semantics. – spraff Mar 27 '14 at 13:54

64 Answers 64

Java always uses call by value. That means the method gets copy of all parameter values.

Consider next 3 situations:

1) Trying to change primitive variable

public static void increment(int x) { x++; }

int a = 3;
increment(a);

x will copy value of a and will increment x, a remains the same

2) Trying to change primitive field of an object

public static void increment(Person p) { p.age++; }

Person pers = new Person(20); // age = 20
increment(pers);

p will copy reference value of pers and will increment age field, variables are referencing to the same object so age is changed

3) Trying to change reference value of reference variables

public static void swap(Person p1, Person p2) {
    Person temp = p1;
    p1 = p2;
    p2 = temp;
}

Person pers1 = new Person(10);
Person pers2 = new Person(20);
swap(pers1, pers2);

after calling swap p1, p2 copy reference values from pers1 and pers2, are swapping with values, so pers1 and pers2 remain the same

So. you can change only fields of objects in method passing copy of reference value to this object.

share|improve this answer

So many long answers. Let me give a simple one:

  • Java always passes everything by value
  • that means also references are passed by value

In short, you can not modify value of any parameter passed, but you can call methods or change attributes of an object reference passed.

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Have a look at this code. This code will not throw NullPointerException... It will print "Vinay"

public class Main {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        String temp = "Vinay";
        print(temp);
        System.err.println(temp);
    }

    private static void print(String temp) {
        temp = null;
    }
}

If Java is pass by reference then it should have thrown NullPointerException as reference is set to Null.

share|improve this answer
    
The static is throwing it off. public class Main { public static void main(String[] args) { Main m = new Main(); m.aaa(); } public void aaa() { String temp = "Vinay"; print(temp); System.err.println(temp); } private void print(String temp) { temp = null; } } the above code does not NPE. – Milhous Aug 12 '10 at 21:27
    
Didn't got what you are trying to say..? – Vinay Lodha Aug 13 '10 at 6:27
4  
Doesn't answer the question. The OP is asking for an explanation, not just a proof. – EJP Aug 2 '13 at 10:04

In my opinion, "pass by value" is a terrible way to singularly describe two similar but different events. I guess they should have asked me first.

With primitives we are passing the actual value of the primitive into the method (or constructor), be it the integer "5", the character "c", or what have you. That actual value then becomes its own local primitive. But with objects, all we are doing is giving the same object an additional reference (a local reference), so that we now have two references pointing to the same object.

I hope this simple explanation helps.

share|improve this answer
    
'Pass by value' is a standard term in computer science and has been since the 1950s. No point in complaining about it now. – EJP Jun 7 at 3:59

Everything is passed by value. Primitives and Object references. But objects can be changed, if their interface allows it.

When you pass an object to a method, you are passing a reference, and the object can be modified by the method implementation.

void bithday(Person p) {
    p.age++;
}

The reference of the object itself, is passed by value: you can reassign the parameter, but the change is not reflected back:

void renameToJon(Person p) { 
    p = new Person("Jon"); // this will not work
}

jack = new Person("Jack");
renameToJon(jack);
sysout(jack); // jack is unchanged

As matter of effect, "p" is reference (pointer to the object) and can't be changed.

Primitive types are passed by value. Object's reference can be considered a primitive type too.

To recap, everything is passed by value.

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Shortest answer :)

  • Java has pass-by-value (and pass-reference-by-value.)
  • C# also has pass-by-reference

In C# this is accomplished with the "out" and "ref" keywords.

Pass By Reference: The variable is passed in such a way that a reassignment inside the method is reflected even outside the method.

Here follows an example of passing-by-reference (C#). This feature does not exist in java.

class Example
{
    static void InitArray(out int[] arr)
    {
        arr = new int[5] { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 };
    }

    static void Main()
    {
        int[] someArray;
        InitArray(out someArray);

        // This is true !
        boolean isTrue = (someArray[0] == 1);
    }
}

See also: MSDN library (C#): passing arrays by ref and out

See also: MSDN library (C#): passing by by value and by reference

share|improve this answer
    
in java we can do: someArray = InitArray(someArray) assuming we have this: static int [] InitArray( int[] arr){ ... return ...} – Kachna Feb 27 at 11:06
    
You are correct. That's a possible alternative for a simple pass-by-reference. But pass-by-reference can do more powerful things. e.g. it could assign multiple values: e.g. int[] array1; int[] array2; InnitArrays(out array1, out array2); assuming that you create a method static void InitArray(out int[] a1, out int[] a2){...} – bvdb Feb 27 at 16:28

Java passes parameters by value, but for object variables, the values are essentially references to objects. Since arrays are objects the following example code shows the difference.

public static void dummyIncrease(int[] x, int y)
{
    x[0]++;
    y++;
}
public static void main(String[] args)
{
    int[] arr = {3, 4, 5};
    int b = 1;
    dummyIncrease(arr, b);
    // arr[0] is 4, but b is still 1
}

main()
  arr +---+       +---+---+---+
      | # | ----> | 3 | 4 | 5 |
      +---+       +---+---+---+
  b   +---+             ^
      | 1 |             | 
      +---+             |
                        |
dummyIncrease()         |
  x   +---+             |
      | # | ------------+
      +---+      
  y   +---+ 
      | 1 | 
      +---+ 
share|improve this answer

Simple program

import java.io.*;
class Aclass
{
    public int a;
}
public class test
{
    public static void foo_obj(Aclass obj)
    {
        obj.a=5;
    }
    public static void foo_int(int a)
    {
        a=3;
    }
    public static void main(String args[])
    {
        //test passing an object
        Aclass ob = new Aclass();
        ob.a=0;
        foo_obj(ob);
        System.out.println(ob.a);//prints 5

        //test passing an integer
        int i=0;
        foo_int(i);
        System.out.println(i);//prints 0
    }
}

From a C/C++ programmer's point of view, java uses pass by value, so for primitive data types (int, char etc) changes in the function does not reflect in the calling function. But when you pass an object and in the function you change its data members or call member functions which can change the state of the object, the calling function will get the changes.

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1  
You can only define one class per file. This is not including nested and inner classes. Considering this will be something a new programmer will be reading, you should explain this to the user; allowing them to duplicate the code on their machine. – mrres1 Jan 25 '15 at 1:30
2  
@mrres1 Not entirely correct. You can define only one public top-level class/interface per file. Supporting several classes per file is a remnant from the first Java version, which didn't have nested classes, but it is still supported, though often frowned upon. – MrBackend Mar 19 '15 at 13:53

In an attempt to add even more to this, I thought I'd include the SCJP Study Guide section on the topic. This is from the guide that is made to pass the Sun/Oracle test on the behaviour of Java so it's a good source to use for this discussion.

Passing Variables into Methods (Objective 7.3)

7.3 Determine the effect upon object references and primitive values when they are passed into methods that perform assignments or other modifying operations on the parameters.

Methods can be declared to take primitives and/or object references. You need to know how (or if) the caller's variable can be affected by the called method. The difference between object reference and primitive variables, when passed into methods, is huge and important. To understand this section, you'll need to be comfortable with the assignments section covered in the first part of this chapter.

Passing Object Reference Variables

When you pass an object variable into a method, you must keep in mind that you're passing the object reference, and not the actual object itself. Remember that a reference variable holds bits that represent (to the underlying VM) a way to get to a specific object in memory (on the heap). More importantly, you must remember that you aren't even passing the actual reference variable, but rather a copy of the reference variable. A copy of a variable means you get a copy of the bits in that variable, so when you pass a reference variable, you're passing a copy of the bits representing how to get to a specific object. In other words, both the caller and the called method will now have identical copies of the reference, and thus both will refer to the same exact (not a copy) object on the heap.

For this example, we'll use the Dimension class from the java.awt package:

1. import java.awt.Dimension;
2. class ReferenceTest {
3.     public static void main (String [] args) {
4.         Dimension d = new Dimension(5,10);
5.         ReferenceTest rt = new ReferenceTest();
6.         System.out.println("Before modify() d.height = " + d.height);
7.         rt.modify(d);
8.         System.out.println("After modify() d.height = "
9.     }
10.
11.
12.
13.   }
14. }

When we run this class, we can see that the modify() method was indeed able to modify the original (and only) Dimension object created on line 4.

C:\Java Projects\Reference>java ReferenceTest
Before modify() d.height = 10
dim = 11
After modify() d.height = 11

Notice when the Dimension object on line 4 is passed to the modify() method, any changes to the object that occur inside the method are being made to the object whose reference was passed. In the preceding example, reference variables d and dim both point to the same object.

Does Java Use Pass-By-Value Semantics?

If Java passes objects by passing the reference variable instead, does that mean Java uses pass-by-reference for objects? Not exactly, although you'll often hear and read that it does. Java is actually pass-by-value for all variables running within a single VM. Pass-by-value means pass-by-variable-value. And that means, pass-by-copy-of- the-variable! (There's that word copy again!)

It makes no difference if you're passing primitive or reference variables, you are always passing a copy of the bits in the variable. So for a primitive variable, you're passing a copy of the bits representing the value. For example, if you pass an int variable with the value of 3, you're passing a copy of the bits representing 3. The called method then gets its own copy of the value, to do with it what it likes.

And if you're passing an object reference variable, you're passing a copy of the bits representing the reference to an object. The called method then gets its own copy of the reference variable, to do with it what it likes. But because two identical reference variables refer to the exact same object, if the called method modifies the object (by invoking setter methods, for example), the caller will see that the object the caller's original variable refers to has also been changed. In the next section, we'll look at how the picture changes when we're talking about primitives.

The bottom line on pass-by-value: the called method can't change the caller's variable, although for object reference variables, the called method can change the object the variable referred to. What's the difference between changing the variable and changing the object? For object references, it means the called method can't reassign the caller's original reference variable and make it refer to a different object, or null. For example, in the following code fragment,

        void bar() {
           Foo f = new Foo();
           doStuff(f);
        }
        void doStuff(Foo g) {
           g.setName("Boo");
           g = new Foo();
        }

reassigning g does not reassign f! At the end of the bar() method, two Foo objects have been created, one referenced by the local variable f and one referenced by the local (argument) variable g. Because the doStuff() method has a copy of the reference variable, it has a way to get to the original Foo object, for instance to call the setName() method. But, the doStuff() method does not have a way to get to the f reference variable. So doStuff() can change values within the object f refers to, but doStuff() can't change the actual contents (bit pattern) of f. In other words, doStuff() can change the state of the object that f refers to, but it can't make f refer to a different object!

Passing Primitive Variables

Let's look at what happens when a primitive variable is passed to a method:

class ReferenceTest {
    public static void main (String [] args) {
      int a = 1;
      ReferenceTest rt = new ReferenceTest();
      System.out.println("Before modify() a = " + a);
      rt.modify(a);
      System.out.println("After modify() a = " + a);
    }
    void modify(int number) {
      number = number + 1;
      System.out.println("number = " + number);
    }
}

In this simple program, the variable a is passed to a method called modify(), which increments the variable by 1. The resulting output looks like this:

  Before modify() a = 1
  number = 2
  After modify() a = 1

Notice that a did not change after it was passed to the method. Remember, it was a copy of a that was passed to the method. When a primitive variable is passed to a method, it is passed by value, which means pass-by-copy-of-the-bits-in-the-variable.

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Mr @Scott Stanchfield wrote an excellent answer. Here is the class that would you to verify exactly what he meant:

public class Dog {

    String dog ;
    static int x_static;
    int y_not_static;

    public String getName()
    {
        return this.dog;
    }

    public Dog(String dog)
    {
        this.dog = dog;
    }

    public void setName(String name)
    {
        this.dog = name;
    }

    public static void foo(Dog someDog)
    {
        x_static = 1;
        // y_not_static = 2;  // not possible !!
        someDog.setName("Max");     // AAA
        someDog = new Dog("Fifi");  // BBB
        someDog.setName("Rowlf");   // CCC
    }

    public static void main(String args[])
    {
        Dog myDog = new Dog("Rover");
        foo(myDog);
        System.out.println(myDog.getName());
    }
}

So, we pass from main() a dog called Rover, then we assign a new address to the pointer that we passed, but at the end, the name of the dog is not Rover, and not Fifi, and certainly not Rowlf, but Max.

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Understand it in 2 Steps:

You can't change the reference to the object itself but you can work with this passed parameter as a reference to the object.

If you want to change the value behind the reference you will only declare a new variable on the stack with the same name 'd'. Look at the references with the sign @ and you will find out that the reference has been changed.

public static void foo(Dog d) {
  d.Name = "belly";
  System.out.println(d); //Reference: Dog@1540e19d

  d = new Dog("wuffwuff");
  System.out.println(d); //Dog@677327b6
}
public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception{
  Dog lisa = new Dog("Lisa");
  foo(lisa);
  System.out.println(lisa.Name); //belly
}
share|improve this answer

Java passes everything by value!!

//create an object by passing in a name and age:

PersonClass variable1 = new PersonClass("Mary", 32);

PersonClass variable2;

//Both variable2 and variable1 now reference the same object

variable2 = variable1; 


PersonClass variable3 = new PersonClass("Andre", 45);

// variable1 now points to variable3

variable1 = variable3;

//WHAT IS OUTPUT BY THIS?

System.out.println(variable2);
System.out.println(variable1);

Mary 32
Andre 45

if you could understand this example we r done. otherwise, please visit this webPage for detailed explanation:

webPage

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Java passes parameters by VALUE. And by value ONLY.

To cut long story short:

For those comming from C#: THERE'S NO "out" parameter.

For those comming from PASCAL: THERE'S NO "var" parameter.

It means you can't change the reference from object itself, but you can always change the object's properties.

A workaround is to use StringBuilder parameter instead String. And you can always use arrays!

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There is a very simple way to understand this. Lets's take C++ pass by reference.

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

class Foo {
    private:
        int x;
    public:
        Foo(int val) {x = val;}
        void foo()
        {
            cout<<x<<endl;
        }
};

void bar(Foo& ref)
{
    ref.foo();
    ref = *(new Foo(99));
    ref.foo();
}

int main()
{
   Foo f = Foo(1);
   f.foo();
   bar(f);
   f.foo();

   return 0;
}

What is the outcome?

1
1
99
99

So, after bar() assigned a new value to a "reference" passed in, it actually changed the one which was passed in from main itself, explaining the last f.foo() call from main printing 99.

Now, lets see what java says.

public class Ref {

    private static class Foo {
        private int x;

        private Foo(int x) {
            this.x = x;
        }

        private void foo() {
            System.out.println(x);
        }
    }

    private static void bar(Foo f) {
        f.foo();
        f = new Foo(99);
        f.foo();
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Foo f = new Foo(1);
        System.out.println(f.x);
        bar(f);
        System.out.println(f.x);
    }

}

It says:

1
1
99
1

Voilà, the reference of Foo in main that was passed to bar, is still unchanged!

This example clearly shows that java is not the same as C++ when we say "pass by reference". Essentially, java is passing "references" as "values" to functions, meaning java is pass by value.

share|improve this answer
    
Is there an issue in your c++ version where your risking a segfault when Foo(99) goes out of scope but you reference it in your main method? – matt Jun 15 at 8:14
    
Indeed. Ah comes from using java for 10 years. But the idea still holds. And I fixed it now. – Ravi Sanwal Jun 16 at 15:16
    
I think the previous was better because it would compile. I was just curious about the behavior, sorry about that. – matt Jun 16 at 17:41

It's a bit hard to understand, but Java always copies the value - the point is, normally the value is a reference. Therefore you end up with the same object without thinking about it...

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There is a workaround in Java for the reference. Let me explain by this example:

public class Yo {
public static void foo(int x){
    System.out.println(x); //out 2
    x = x+2;
    System.out.println(x); // out 4
}
public static void foo(int[] x){
    System.out.println(x[0]); //1
    x[0] = x[0]+2;
    System.out.println(x[0]); //3
}
public static void main(String[] args) {
    int t = 2;
    foo(t);
    System.out.println(t); // out 2 (t did not change in foo)

    int[] tab = new int[]{1};
    foo(tab);
    System.out.println(tab[0]); // out 3 (tab[0] did change in foo)
}}

I hope this helps!

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The bottom line on pass-by-value: the called method can't change the caller's variable, although for object reference variables, the called method can change the object the variable referred to. What's the difference between changing the variable and changing the object? For object references, it means the called method can't reassign the caller's original reference variable and make it refer to a different object, or null.

I took this code and explanation from a book on Java Certification and made some minor changes.
I think it's a good illustration to the pass by value of an object. In the code below, reassigning g does not reassign f! At the end of the bar() method, two Foo objects have been created, one referenced by the local variable f and one referenced by the local (argument) variable g.

Because the doStuff() method has a copy of the reference variable, it has a way to get to the original Foo object, for instance to call the setName() method. But, the doStuff() method does not have a way to get to the f reference variable. So doStuff() can change values within the object f refers to, but doStuff() can't change the actual contents (bit pattern) of f. In other words, doStuff() can change the state of the object that f refers to, but it can't make f refer to a different object!

package test.abc;

public class TestObject {

    /**
     * @param args
     */
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        bar();
    }

    static void bar() {
        Foo f = new Foo();
        System.out.println("Object reference for f: " + f);
        f.setName("James");
        doStuff(f);
        System.out.println(f.getName());
        //Can change the state of an object variable in f, but can't change the object reference for f.
        //You still have 2 foo objects.
        System.out.println("Object reference for f: " + f);
        }

    static void doStuff(Foo g) {
            g.setName("Boo");
            g = new Foo();
            System.out.println("Object reference for g: " + g);
        }
}


package test.abc;

public class Foo {
    public String name = "";

    public String getName() {
        return name;
    }

    public void setName(String name) {
        this.name = name;
    }

}

Note that the object reference has not changed in the console output below:

Console output:

Object reference for f: test.abc.Foo@62f72617

Object reference for g: test.abc.Foo@4fe5e2c3

Boo Object reference for f: test.abc.Foo@62f72617

share|improve this answer

The Java programming language passes arguments only by value, that is, you cannot change the argument value in the calling method from within the called method.


However, when an object instance is passed as an argument to a method, the value of the argument is not the object itself but a reference to the object. You can change the contents of the object in the called method but not the object reference.


To many people, this looks like pass-by-reference, and behaviorally, it has much in common with pass-by-reference. However, there are two reasons this is inaccurate.

  • Firstly, the ability to change the thing passed into a method only applies to objects, not primitive values.

  • Second, the actual value associated with a variable of object type is the reference to the object, and not the object itself. This is an important distinction in other ways, and if clearly understood, is entirely supporting of the point that the Java programming language passes arguments by value.


The following code example illustrates this point:
1 public class PassTest {
2
3   // Methods to change the current values
4   public static void changeInt(int value) {
5     value = 55;
6  }
7   public static void changeObjectRef(MyDate ref) {
8     ref = new MyDate(1, 1, 2000);
9  }
10   public static void changeObjectAttr(MyDate ref) {
11     ref.setDay(4);
12   }
13
14 public static void main(String args[]) {
15     MyDate date;
16     int val;
17
18     // Assign the int
19     val = 11;
20     // Try to change it
21     changeInt(val);
22     // What is the current value?
23     System.out.println("Int value is: " + val);
24
25 // Assign the date
26     date = new MyDate(22, 7, 1964);
27     // Try to change it
28     changeObjectRef(date);
29     // What is the current value?
30 System.out.println("MyDate: " + date);
31
32 // Now change the day attribute
33     // through the object reference
34     changeObjectAttr(date);
35     // What is the current value?
36 System.out.println("MyDate: " + date);
37   }
38 }

This code outputs the following:
java PassTest
Int value is: 11
MyDate: 22-7-1964
MyDate: 4-7-1964
The MyDate object is not changed by the changeObjectRef method;
however, the changeObjectAttr method changes the day attribute of the
MyDate object.
share|improve this answer

ACCORDING TO C++ TERMINOLOGY :

  1. Primitive Types and their wrappers - Pass by Value
  2. Other Complex Datatypes - Pass by Reference

(Although Java is completely Pass by Value, in the second case it passes the reference to the object and in this case the value of the object if changed is reflected in the main function and so I called it Pass by Reference according to C++ Terminology.) If you are hailing from C++, then Java is pass by value for Primitive types and their Wrapper Classes like int, Integer, bool, Boolean i.e., if you pass a value of these data types, there will be no change in the original function. For all other kinds of datatypes java just passes them and if any change is made, the change can be seen in the original function(It can be called pass by reference according to c++ terminology)

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2  
Please provide a definitive reference for this; i.e. a specific reference to a specific section of an official C++ specification. (I suspect that this is how you would describe the >>representations<< in C++ if you were simulating the behavior of Java parameter using C++ features. But that is missing the point. What we are talking about here is language models, and it is well know that Java and C++'s respective language models are (very) different.) – Stephen C Dec 10 '15 at 22:44

I made this little diagram that shows how the data gets created and passed

Diagram of how data is created and passed

Note: Primitive values are passed as a value, the first reference to to that value is the method's argument

That means:

  • You can change the value of myObject inside the function
  • But you can't change what myObject references to, inside the function, because point is not myObject
  • Remember, both point and myObject are references, different references, however, those references point at the same new Point(0,0)
share|improve this answer

Java arguments are all passed by value (the variable is copied when used by the method) :

In the case of primitive types, Java behaviour is simple: The value is copied in another instance of the primitive type.

In case of Objects, this is the same: Object variables are pointers (buckets) holding only Object’s address that was created using the "new" keyword, and are copied like primitive types.

The behaviour can appear different from primitive types: Because the copied object-variable contains the same address (to the same Object) Object's content/members might still be modified within a method and later access outside, giving the illusion that the Object itself was passed by reference.

"String" Objects appear to be a perfect counter-example to the urban legend saying that "Objects are passed by reference":

In a String Object, characters are hold by an array that is declared final and thus can't be modified. Only the address of the Object might be replaced by another using "new". But inside a method, using "new" to update the variable, will not let the Object be accessed from outside, since the variable was initially passed by value and copied.

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Java is a pass-by-value, when you pass a primitive\wrapper you will pass its inner value, and when you pass an object (a reference) you will pass its value (which is the address of the object it references in the memory).

Check the comments to understand what happens in execution; follow numbers as they show the flow of execution ..

class Example
{
    public static void test (Cat ref)
    {
        // 3-ref is a copy of the reference a
        // both currently reference Grumpy
        System.out.println(ref.getName());

        // 4-now ref references a new object Nyan
        ref = new Cat("Nyan");

        // 5-this will print Nyan
        System.out.println(ref.getName());
    }

    public static void main (String [] args)
    {
        // 1-Cat reference a references Cat object in memory
        Cat a = new Cat("Grumpy");

        // 2-call function test given a copy of reference a
        test (a);

        // 6-function call ends, and the ref life-time ends
        // Nyan object has no references and Garbage
        // collector will remove it from memory

        // 7-this will print Grumpy
        System.out.println(a.getName());
    }
}
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Java is pass by value, where values (for non primitive types) happen to be references.

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Java passes references to objects by value.

So if any modification is done to the Object to which the reference argument points it will be reflected back on the original object.

But if the reference argument point to another Object still the original reference will point to original Object.

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Java is always PASS BY VALUE

in case of passing references : the value of the Reference types are passed by Value ( i.e. a special case of Pass BY Value)

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java strictly follow the call value. There is no meaning of pass by reference in java.

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Java has only pass by value. A very simple example to validate this.

public void test(){
    MyClass obj =null;
    init(obj);
    //After calling init method, obj still points to null
    //this is because obj is passed as value and not as reference.
}
private void init(MyClass objVar){
    objVar=new MyClass();
}
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Java programming language always uses call by value. In Java, all parameters to methods are call by value or pass by value. Cay S. Horstmann and Garry Cornell have mentioned in their very famous book "Core Java Volume - I Fundamentals" that the Java programming language always uses call by value. That means the method gets a copy of all parameter values, and the method cannot modify the contents of any parameter variables that are passed to it. Here is a tutorial dedicated to call by value and call by reference topic.

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But, what value is being passed? The reference to the object. That's what confuses most people. It appears to be pass by reference because of that, but it's not. – Maladon Apr 17 '14 at 13:15

In java actually we pass arguments as value of , reference object. Due to this term, some people mislead that Java is strictly pass by reference.

In case of primitive types, we pass only values.

But in case of class objects, we pass a copy of address of reference object. Hence whatever changes we made to the value in that duplicate address of original reference, will affect the whole program.

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"whatever changes we made to the value in that duplicate address of original reference, will affect the whole program." and that is called reference in the rest of the world :-) – karatedog Dec 13 '13 at 12:24
    
@karatedog You're missing the point that the "reference" is actually a pointer, a memory address. You don't modify the address the variable stores. You only modify the contents of the address. (That's putting it more in C terms, but this is essentially the underlying mechanism). – PC Luddite Feb 20 at 4:46

I think you firstly should not be confused between value and reference.

A a = new A();
A b = a;
A c = b;

When b=a, b always got the value of a, and a has the value too. So you can separate reference and value. You can imagine like this: a and b are both names, and they are refer to your dog, when c=b is compiled, your dog got another name called c. If the dog is passed to a method, whatever its name is when it was passing, the method got the dog, not the name.

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protected by Nick Craver Jun 24 '11 at 18:08

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