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I always thought Java was pass-by-reference; however I've seen a couple of blog posts (for example, this blog) that claim it's not. I don't think I understand the distinction they're making.

What is the explanation?

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163  
I believe that much of the confusion on this issue has to do with the fact that different people have different definitions of the term "reference". People coming from a C++ background assume that "reference" must mean what it meant in C++, people from a C background assume "reference" must be the same as "pointer" in their language, and so on. Whether it's correct to say that Java passes by reference really depends on what's meant by "reference". –  Gravity Jul 30 '11 at 7:23
29  
I try to consistently use the terminology found at the Evaluation Strategy article. It should be noted that, even though the article points out the terms vary greatly by community, it stresses that the semantics for call-by-value and call-by-reference differ in a very crucial way. (Personally I prefer to use call-by-object-sharing these days over call-by-value[-of-the-reference], as this describes the semantics at a high-level and does not create a conflict with call-by-value, which is the underlying implementation.) –  user166390 Dec 15 '11 at 6:12
3  
@Gravity: Can you go and put your comment on a HUGE billboard or something? That's the whole issue in a nutshell. And it shows that this whole thing is semantics. If we don't agree on the base definition of a reference, then we won't agree on the answer to this question :) –  MadConan Nov 12 '13 at 20:58
5  
I would rather ask if values passed to methods are copied at time of invocation. I guess that this is the question you are looking for. –  lukasz1985 Dec 28 '13 at 12:56

52 Answers 52

Java is always pass-by-value. The difficult thing can be to understand that Java passes objects as references and those references are passed by value.

It goes like this:

Dog aDog = new Dog("Max");
foo(aDog);
aDog.getName().equals("Max"); // true

public void foo(Dog d) {
  d.getName().equals("Max"); // true
  d = new Dog("Fifi");
  d.getName().equals("Fifi"); // true
}

In this example aDog.getName() will still return "Max". d is not overwritten in the function as the object reference is passed by value.

Likewise:

Dog aDog = new Dog("Max");
foo(aDog);
aDog.getName().equals("Fifi"); // true

public void foo(Dog d) {
  d.getName().equals("Max"); // true
  d.setName("Fifi");
}
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48  
Isn't it slightly confusing the issue with internal details? There's no conceptual difference between 'passing a reference' and 'passing the value of a reference', assuming that you mean 'the value of the internal pointer to the object'. –  izb Sep 8 '08 at 14:58
148  
But there is a subtle difference. Look at the first example. If it was purely pass by reference, aDog.name would be "Fifi". It isn't - the reference you are getting is a value reference that if overwritten will be restored when exiting the function. –  erlando Sep 11 '08 at 6:55
118  
@Lorenzo: No, in Java everything is passed by value. Primitives are passed by value, and object references are passed by value. The objects themselves are never passed to a method, but the objects are always in the heap and only a reference to the object is passed to the method. –  Esko Luontola Feb 12 '09 at 23:02
84  
My attempt at a good way to visualize object passing: Imagine a balloon. Calling a fxn is like tieing a second string to the balloon and handing the line to the fxn. parameter = new Balloon() will cut that string and create a new balloon (but this has no effect on the original balloon). parameter.pop() will still pop it though because it follows the string to the same, original balloon. Java is pass by value, but the value passed is not deep, it is at the highest level, i.e. a primitive or a pointer. Don't confuse that with a deep pass-by-value where the object is entirely cloned and passed. –  dhackner Oct 20 '10 at 16:38
78  
It makes me cringe to see you compare strings with the == operator. –  Brandon DuRette Jan 7 '11 at 22:43

I just noticed you referenced my article ;)

The Java Spec says that everything in Java is pass-by-value. There is no such thing as "pass-by-reference" in Java.

The key to understanding this is that something like

Dog myDog;

is not a Dog; it's actually a pointer to a Dog.

What that means, is when you have

Dog myDog = new Dog("Rover");
foo(myDog);

you're essentially passing the address of the created Dog object to the foo method.

(I say essentially because Java pointers aren't direct addresses, but it's easiest to think of them that way)

Suppose the Dog object resides at memory address 42. This means we pass 42 to the method.

if the Method were defined as

public void foo(Dog someDog) {
    someDog.setName("Max");     // AAA
    someDog = new Dog("Fifi");  // BBB
    someDog.setName("Rowlf");   // CCC
}

let's look at what's happening.

  • the parameter someDog is set to the value 42
  • at line "AAA"
    • someDog is followed to the Dog it points to (the Dog object at address 42)
    • that Dog (the one at address 42) is asked to change his name to Max
  • at line "BBB"
    • a new Dog is created. Let's say he's at address 74
    • we assign the parameter someDog to 74
  • at line "CCC"
    • someDog is followed to the Dog it points to (the Dog object at address 74)
    • that Dog (the one at address 74) is asked to change his name to Rowlf
  • then, we return

Now let's think about what happens outside the method:

Did myDog change?

There's the key.

Keeping in mind that myDog is a pointer, and not an actual Dog, the answer is NO. myDog still has the value 42; it's still pointing to the original Dog.

It's perfectly valid to follow an address and change what's at the end of it; that does not change the variable, however.

Java works exactly like C. You can assign a pointer, pass the pointer to a method, follow the pointer in the method and change the data that was pointed to. However, you cannot change where that pointer points.

In C++, Ada, Pascal and other languages that support pass-by-reference, you can actually change the variable that was passed.

If Java had pass-by-reference semantics, the foo method we defined above would have changed where myDog was pointing when it assigned someDog on line BBB.

Think of reference parameters as being aliases for the variable passed in. When that alias is assigned, so is the variable that was passed in.

Does that help? (I'll have to add this as an addendum to my article...)
-- Scott

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7  
This is why the common refrain "Java doesn't have pointers" is so misleading. –  Beska Apr 2 '09 at 17:52
74  
You are wrong, imho. "Keeping in mind that myDog is a pointer, and not an actual Dog, the answer is NO. myDog still has the value 42; it's still pointing to the original Dog." myDog has value 42 but its name argument now contains "Max", rather than "Rover" on // AAA line. –  Comptrol Apr 6 '09 at 5:22
54  
Think about it this way. Someone has the address of Ann Arbor, MI (my hometown, GO BLUE!) on a slip of paper called "annArborLocation". You copy it down on a piece of paper called "myDestination". You can drive to "myDestination" and plant a tree. You may have changed something about the city at that location, but it doesn't change the LAT/LON that was written on either paper. You can change the LAT/LON on "myDestination" but it doesn't change "annArborLocation". Does that help? –  Scott Stanchfield Apr 23 '09 at 13:06
5  
@Scott Stanchfield: I read your article about a year ago and it really helped clear things up for me. Thanks! May I humbly suggest a little addition: you should mention that there is actually a specific term that describes this form of "call by value where the value is a reference" that was invented by Barbara Liskov for describing the evaluation strategy of her CLU language in 1974, in order to avoid confusion such as the one your article addresses: call by sharing (sometimes called call by object-sharing or simply call by object), which pretty much perfectly describes the semantics. –  Jörg W Mittag Sep 7 '10 at 22:12
2  
Good article. I do not like to talk about pointers together with Java though.. When one knows how Java and its variables scope/lifetime work, reference is the term to use. With pointers people start wondering about pointing pointers or given that a reference is a pointer, about dereferencing a reference in a C++ fashion. That's not good. A variable is made of bits -a value-, and this value can reference an Object. That is, it tells the JVM how to find an Object in the Heap. This value is copied/duplicated and passed to a method variable that then can find the same object. No need for pointers. –  Gevorg Aug 12 '11 at 4:07

This will give you some insights of how Java really works to the point that in your next discussion about Java passing by reference or passing by value you'll just smile :-)

Step one please erase from your mind that word that starts with 'p' "_ _ _ _ _ _ _", especially if you come from other programming languages. Java and 'p' cannot be written in the same book, forum, or even txt.

Step two remember that when you pass an Object into a method you're passing the Object reference and not the Object itself.

  • Student: Master, does this mean that Java is pass-by-reference?
  • Master: Grasshopper, No.

Now think of what an Object's reference/variable does/is:

  1. A variable holds the bits that tell the JVM how to get to the referenced Object in memory (Heap).
  2. When passing arguments to a method you ARE NOT passing the reference variable, but a copy of the bits in the reference variable. Something like this: 3bad086a. 3bad086a represents a way to get to the passed object.
  3. So you're just passing 3bad086a that it's the value of the reference.
  4. You're passing the value of the reference and not the reference itself (and not the object).
  5. This value is actually COPIED and given to the method.

In the following (please don't try to compile/execute this...):

1. Person person;
2. person = new Person("Tom");
3. changeName(person);
4.
5. //I didn't use Person person below as an argument to be nice
6. static void changeName(Person anotherReferenceToTheSamePersonObject) {
7.     anotherReferenceToTheSamePersonObject.setName("Jerry");
8. }

What happens?

  • The variable person is created in line #1 and it's null at the beginning.
  • A new Person Object is created in line #2, stored in memory, and the variable person is given the reference to the Person object. That is, its address. Let's say 3bad086a.
  • The variable person holding the address of the Object is passed to the function in line #3.
  • In line #4 you can listen to the sound of silence
  • Check the comment on line #5
  • A method local variable -anotherReferenceToTheSamePersonObject- is created and then comes the magic in line #6:
    • The variable/reference person is copied bit-by-bit and passed to anotherReferenceToTheSamePersonObject inside the function.
    • No new instances of Person are created.
    • Both "person" and "anotherReferenceToTheSamePersonObject" hold the same value of 3bad086a.
    • Don't try this but person==anotherReferenceToTheSamePersonObject would be true.
    • Both variables have IDENTICAL COPIES of the reference and they both refer to the same Person Object, the SAME Object on the Heap and NOT A COPY.

A picture is worth a thousand words:

Pass by Value

Note that the anotherReferenceToTheSamePersonObject arrows is directed towards the Object and not towards the variable person!

If you didn't get it then just trust me and remember that it's better to say that Java is pass by value. Well, pass by reference value. Oh well, even better is pass-by-copy-of-the-variable-value! ;)

Now feel free to hate me but note that given this there is no difference between passing primitive data types and Objects when talking about method arguments.

You always pass a copy of the bits of the value of the reference!

  • If it's a primitive data type these bits will contain the value of the primitive data type itself.
  • If it's an Object the bits will contain the value of the address that tells the JVM how to get to the Object.

Java is pass-by-value because inside a method you can modify the referenced Object as much as you want but no matter how hard you try you'll never be able to modify the passed variable that will keep referencing (not p _ _ _ _ _ _ _) the same Object no matter what!


The changeName function above will never be able to modify the actual content (the bit values) of the passed reference. In other word changeName cannot make Person person refer to another Object.


Of course you can cut it short and just say that Java is pass-by-value!

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2  
Do you mean pointers?.. If I get it correctly, in public void foo(Car car){ ... }, car is local to foo and it contains the heap location of the Object? So if I change car's value by car = new Car(), it will point to different Object on the heap? and if I change car's property valu by car.Color = "Red", the Object in the heap pointed by car will be modified. Also, it is the same in C#? Please reply! Thanks! –  dpp Feb 25 '12 at 3:29
3  
@domanokz You're killing me, please don't say that word again! ;) Note that I could have answered this question without saying 'reference' as well. It's a terminology issue and 'p's make it worse. Me and Scot have different views on this unfortunately. I think you got how it works in Java, now you can call it pass by-value, by-object-sharing, by-copy-of-the-variable-value, or feel free to come up with something else! I don't really care as long as you got how it works and what's in a variable of type Object: just a PO Box address! ;) –  Gevorg Feb 25 '12 at 21:25

Java always passes arguments by value NOT by reference.


Let me explain this through an example:

public class Main{
     public static void main(String[] args){
          Foo f = new Foo("f");
          changeReference(f); // It won't change the reference!
          modifyReference(f); // It will modify the object that the reference variable "f" refers to!
     }
     public static void changeReference(Foo a){
          Foo b = new Foo("b");
          a = b;
     }
     public static void modifyReference(Foo c){
          c.setAttribute("c");
     }
}

I will explain this in steps:

  1. Declaring a reference named f of type Foo and assign it to a new object of type Foo with an attribute "f".

    Foo f = new Foo("f");
    

    enter image description here

  2. From the method side, a reference of type Foo with a name a is declared and it's initially assigned to null.

    public static void changeReference(Foo a)
    

    enter image description here

  3. As you call the method changeReference, the reference a will be assigned to the object which is passed as an argument.

    changeReference(f);
    

    enter image description here

  4. Declaring a reference named b of type Foo and assign it to a new object of type Foo with an attribute "b".

    Foo b = new Foo("b");
    

    enter image description here

  5. a = b is re-assigning the reference a NOT f to the object whose its attribute is "b".

    enter image description here


  6. As you call modifyReference(Foo c) method, a reference c is created and assigned to the object with attribute "f".

    enter image description here

  7. c.setAttribute("c"); will change the attribute of the object that reference c points to it, and it's same object that reference f points to it.

    enter image description here

I hope you understand now how passing objects as arguments works in Java :)

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11  
I didn't even read your text. Just glancing at the pictures extracts enough juice from your answer to automagically make me think "very nice explanation". Well done. –  afsantos May 15 '13 at 22:47
1  
+1 Nice stuff. good diagrams. I also found a nice succinct page here adp-gmbh.ch/php/pass_by_reference.html OK I admit it is written in PHP, but it is the priciple of understanding the difference that I think is important (and how to manipulate that difference to your needs). –  DaveM Jun 7 '13 at 8:46
1  
@Eng.Fouad It's a nice explanation but if a points to the same object as f (and never gets its own copy of the object f points to), any changes to the object made using a should modify f aswell (since they are both working with the same object), so at some point a must get its own copy of the object f points to. –  Mr D Jul 15 '13 at 19:08
3  
great memory state diagram, should have higher votes –  laycat Apr 13 at 10:15
3  
The most easily understandable in this post. ;) –  Emerald214 Jul 12 at 12:27

Java is always pass by value, with no exceptions, ever.

So how is it that anyone can be at all confused by this, and believe that Java is pass by reference, or think they have an example of Java acting as pass by reference? The key point is that Java never provides direct access to the values of objects themselves, in any circumstances. The only access to objects is through a reference to that object. Because Java objects are always accessed through a reference, rather than directly, it is common to talk about fields and variables and method arguments as being objects, when pedantically they are only references to objects. The confusion stems from this (strictly speaking, incorrect) change in nomenclature.

So, when calling a method

  • For primitive arguments (int, long, etc.), the pass by value is the actual value of the primitive (for example, 3).
  • For objects, the pass by value is the value of the reference to the object.

So if you have doSomething(foo) and public void doSomething(Foo foo) { .. } the two Foos have copied references that point to the same objects.

Naturally, passing by value a reference to an object looks very like (indistinguishable in practice) from passing an object by reference.

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3  
Since the values of the primitives are immutable (like String), the difference between the two cases is not really relevant. –  Paŭlo Ebermann Feb 3 '11 at 1:23
1  
Exactly. For all you can tell via observable JVM behavior, primitives could be being passed by reference and could live on the heap. They don't, but that's not actually observable in any way. –  Gravity Jul 31 '11 at 4:50

Java passes references by value.

So you can't change the reference that gets passed in.

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9  
But the thing that keeps getting repeated "you can't change the value of objects passed in arguments" is clearly false. You may not be able to make them refer to a different object, but you can change their contents by calling their methods. IMO this means you lose all the benefits of references, and gain no additional guarantees. –  Timmmm Jul 24 '11 at 19:13
14  
I never said "you can't change the value of objects passed in arguments". I will say "You can't change the value of the object reference passed in as a method argument", which is a true statement about the Java language. Obviously you can change the state of the object (as long as it's not immutable). –  ScArcher2 Aug 1 '11 at 14:19
9  
Keep in mind that you cannot actually pass objects in java; the objects stay on the heap. Pointers to the objects can be passed (which get copied onto the stack frame for the called method). So you never change the passed-in value (the pointer), but you're free to follow it and change the thing on the heap to which it points. That's pass-by-value. –  Scott Stanchfield Jan 26 '12 at 22:17

I can't believe that nobody mentioned Barbara Liskov yet. When she designed CLU in 1974, she ran into this same terminology problem, and she invented the term call by sharing (also known as call by object-sharing and call by object) for this specific case of "call by value where the value is a reference".

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1  
I like this distinction in nomenclature. It's unfortunate that Java supports call by sharing for objects, but not call by value (as does C++). Java supports call by value only for primitive data types and not composite data types. –  Derek Mahar Sep 8 '10 at 14:16
2  
I really don't think we needed an extra term - it's simply pass-by-value for a specific type of value. Would adding "call by primitive" add any clarification? –  Scott Stanchfield Oct 25 '10 at 20:03
5  
Call by Sharing –  wulfgar.pro Sep 16 '11 at 0:29

Just to show the contrast, compare the following C++ and Java snippets:

In C++: Note: Bad code - memory leaks! But it demonstrates the point.

void cppMethod(int val, int &ref, Dog obj, Dog &objRef, Dog *objPtr, Dog *&objPtrRef)
{
    val = 7; // Modifies the copy
    ref = 7; // Modifies the original variable
    obj.SetName("obj"); // Modifies the copy of Dog passed
    objRef.SetName("objRef"); // Modifies the original Dog passed
    objPtr->SetName("objPtr"); // Modifies the original Dog pointed to 
                               // by the copy of the pointer passed.
    objPtr = new Dog("newObjPtr");  // Modifies the copy of the pointer, 
                                   // leaving the original object alone.
    objPtrRef->SetName("objRefPtr"); // Modifies the original Dog pointed to 
                                    // by the original pointer passed. 
    objPtrRef = new Dog("newObjRegPtr"); // Modifies the original pointer passed
}

int main()
{
    int a = 0;
    int b = 0;
    Dog d0 = Dog("d0");
    Dog d1 = Dog("d1");
    Dog *d2 = new Dog("d2");
    Dog *d3 = new Dog("d3");
    cppMethod(a, b, d0, d1, d2, d3);
    // a is still set to 0
    // b is now set to 7
    // d0 still have name "d0"
    // d1 now has name "objRef"
    // d2 now has name "objPtr"
    // d3 now has name "newObjPtrRef"
}

In Java,

public static void javaMethod(int val, Dog objPtr)
{
   val = 7; // Modifies the copy
   objPtr.SetName("objPtr") // Modifies the original Dog pointed to 
                            // by the copy of the pointer passed.
   objPtr = new Dog("newObjPtr");  // Modifies the copy of the pointer, 
                                  // leaving the original object alone.
}

public static void main()
{
    int a = 0;
    Dog d0 = new Dog("d0");
    javaMethod(a, d0);
    // a is still set to 0
    // d0 now has name "objPtr"
}

Java only has the two types of passing: by value for built-in types, and by value of the pointer for object types.

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Java passes references to objects by value.

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Everyone here has missed the point. Some came close, but everyone is dancing around the real issue, which is this: stack vs. heap. It's not reference vs. value. In order to understand how Java handles memory, you need to get a good grasp of stack/heap.

Crash course on stack/heap before we get to the Java implementation: Values go on and off the stack in a nice orderly fashion, like a stack of plates at a cafeteria. Memory in the heap (also known as dynamic memory) is haphazard and disorganized. The JVM just finds space wherever it can, and frees it up as the variables that use it are no longer needed.

Okay. First off, primitives go on the stack. So this code:

int x = 3;
float y = 101.1f;
boolean amIAwesome = true;

results in this:

primitives on the stack

When you declare and instantiate an object. The actual object goes on the heap. What goes on the stack? The address of the object on the heap. C++ programmers would call this a pointer, but some Java developers are racist against the word "pointer". Whatever. Just know that the address of the object goes in the stack.

Like so:

int problems = 99;
String name = "Jay-Z";

a b*7ch aint one!

An array is an object, so it goes on the heap as well. And what about the objects in the array? They get their own heap space, and the address of each object goes inside the array.

JButton[] marxBros = new JButton[3];
marxBros[0] = new JButton("Groucho");
marxBros[1] = new JButton("Zeppo");
marxBros[2] = new JButton("Harpo");

marx brothers

So, what gets passed in when you call a method? If you pass in an object, what you're actually passing in is the address of the object. Some might say the "value" of the address, and some say it's just a reference to the object. This is the genesis of the holy war between "reference" and "value" proponents. What you call it isn't as important as that you understand that what's getting passed in is the address to the object.

private static void shout(String name){
    System.out.println("There goes " + name + "!");
}

public static void main(String[] args){
    String hisName = "John J. Jingleheimerschmitz";
    String myName = hisName;
    shout(myName);
}

One String gets created and space for it is allocated in the heap, and the address to the string is stored on the stack and given the identifier hisName, since the address of the second String is the same as the first, no new String is created and no new heap space is allocated, but a new identifier is created on the stack. Then we call shout(): a new stack frame is created and a new identifier, name is created and assigned the address of the already-existing String.

la da di da da da da

So, value, reference? You say "potato".

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1  
Thanks for finally explaining why objects are different from primitives, as everyone else only mentions. Thank you also for pictures. Finally, thank you for explaining Java's apparent behavior of creating local copies in terms of other concepts. –  Bepetersn Nov 1 '13 at 6:46
5  
People are not "dancing around the real issue" of stack vs heap, because that's not the real issue. It's an implementation detail at best, and downright wrong at worst. (It's quite possible for objects to live on the stack; google "escape analysis". And a huge number of objects contain primitives that probably don't live on the stack.) The real issue is exactly the difference between reference types and value types -- in particular, that the value of a reference-type variable is a reference, not the object it refers to. –  cHao Dec 18 '13 at 4:48
1  
That's not correct @cHao. Java does not place any live objects on the stack. It may be an "implementation detail" in that it's not specifically outline in the Java spec, but that fact is that all Java implementations place all objects in the heap. –  cutmancometh Dec 18 '13 at 9:19
1  
Actually, I lied: it is in the spec. The stack is for locals and partial results link‌​, and the heap is for objects link –  cutmancometh Dec 18 '13 at 9:22
1  
It's an "implementation detail" in that Java is never required to actually show you where an object lives in memory, and in fact seems determined to avoid leaking that info. It could put the object on the stack, and you'd never know. If you care, you're focusing on the wrong thing -- and in this case, that means ignoring the real issue. –  cHao Dec 18 '13 at 14:38

The crux of the matter is that the word reference in the expression "pass by reference" means something completely different from the usual mening of the word reference in Java.

Usually in Java reference means a a reference to an object. But the technical terms pass by reference/value from programming language theory is talking about a reference to the memory cell holding the variable, which is someting completely different.

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5  
Colloquially called a pointer. –  Prof. Falken Feb 9 '11 at 9:50
2  
@Gevorg - Then what is a "NullPointerException"? –  Hot Licks Sep 22 '13 at 14:09
1  
It's always seemed to me that the use of "reference" in Java terminology is an affectation that hinders understanding. –  Hot Licks Sep 23 '13 at 15:46

Basically, reassigning Object parameters doesn't affect the argument, e.g.,

private void foo(Object bar) {
    bar = null;
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
    String baz = "Hah!";
    foo(baz);
    System.out.println(baz);
}

will print out "Hah!" instead of NULL. The reason this works is because bar is a copy of the value of baz, which is just a reference to "Hah!". If it were the actual reference itself, then foo would have redefined baz to null.

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As far as I know, Java only knows call by value. This means for primitive datatypes you will work with an copy and for objects you will work with an copy of the reference to the objects. However I think there are some pitfalls; for example, this will not work:

public static void swap(StringBuffer s1, StringBuffer s2) {
    StringBuffer temp = s1;
    s1 = s2;
    s2 = temp;
}


public static void main(String[] args) {
    StringBuffer s1 = new StringBuffer("Hello");
    StringBuffer s2 = new StringBuffer("World");
    swap(s1, s2);
    System.out.println(s1);
    System.out.println(s2);
}

This will populate Hello World and not World Hello because in the swap function you use copys which have no impact on the references in the main. But if your objects are not immutable you can change it for example:

public static void appendWorld(StringBuffer s1) {
    s1.append(" World");
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
    StringBuffer s = new StringBuffer("Hello");
    appendWorld(s);
    System.out.println(s);
}

This will populate Hello World on the command line. If you change StringBuffer into String it will produce just Hello because String is immutable. For example:

public static void appendWorld(String s){
    s = s+" World";
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
    String s = new String("Hello");
    appendWorld(s);
    System.out.println(s);
}

However you could make a wrapper for String like this which would make it able to use it with Strings:

class StringWrapper {
    public String value;

    public StringWrapper(String value) {
        this.value = value;
    }
}

public static void appendWorld(StringWrapper s){
    s.value = s.value +" World";
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
    StringWrapper s = new StringWrapper("Hello");
    appendWorld(s);
    System.out.println(s.value);
}

edit: i believe this is also the reason to use StringBuffer when it comes to "adding" two Strings because you can modifie the original object which u can't with immutable objects like String is.

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No, it's not pass by reference.

Java is pass by value according to the Java Language Specification:

When the method or constructor is invoked (§15.12), the values of the actual argument expressions initialize newly created parameter variables, each of the declared type, before execution of the body of the method or constructor. The Identifier that appears in the DeclaratorId may be used as a simple name in the body of the method or constructor to refer to the formal parameter.

http://docs.oracle.com/javase/specs/jls/se7/html/jls-8.html#jls-8.4.1

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You can never pass by reference in Java, and one of the ways that is obvious is when you want to return more than one value from a method call. Consider the following bit of code in C++:

void getValues(int& arg1, int& arg2) {
    arg1 = 1;
    arg2 = 2;
}
void caller() {
    int x;
    int y;
    getValues(x, y);
    cout << "Result: " << x << " " << y << endl;
}

Sometimes you want to use the same pattern in Java, but you can't; at least not directly. Instead you could do something like this:

void getValues(int[] arg1, int[] arg2) {
    arg1[0] = 1;
    arg2[0] = 2;
}
void caller() {
    int[] x = new int[1];
    int[] y = new int[1];
    getValues(x, y);
    System.out.println("Result: " + x[0] + " " + y[0]);
}

As was explained in previous answers, in Java you're passing a pointer to the array as a value into getValues. That is enough, because the method then modifies the array element, and by convention you're expecting element 0 to contain the return value. Obviously you can do this in other ways, such as structuring your code so this isn't necessary, or constructing a class that can contain the return value or allow it to be set. But the simple pattern available to you in C++ above is not available in Java.

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A few corrections to some posts.

C does NOT support pass by reference. It is ALWAYS pass by value. C++ does support pass by reference, but is not the default and is quite dangerous.

It doesn't matter what the value is in Java: primitive or address(roughly) of object, it is ALWAYS passed by value.

If a Java object "behaves" like it is being passed by reference, that is a property of mutability and has absolutely nothing to do with passing mechanisms.

I am not sure why this is so confusing, perhaps because so many Java "programmers" are not formally trained, and thus do not understand what is really going on in memory?

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1  
+1. What C does support, is treating references (which C calls pointers) as first-class values, and then passing them by value. –  Jörg W Mittag Sep 7 '10 at 22:02
1  
Yeah, in C you can create pointers not only on objects, but on arbitrary variables - so you can easily simulate "call-by-reference" of any variable. In Java this works only for variables which have a surrounding object, which you can give. –  Paŭlo Ebermann Feb 3 '11 at 1:27

The distinction, or perhaps just the way I remember as I used to be under the same impression as the original poster is this: Java is always pass by value. All objects( in Java, anything except for primitives) in Java are references. These references are passed by value.

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Java is always pass by values NOT pass by reference

first of we understand what is pass by value and pass by reference

pass by value means you are making a copy in memory of the actual parameter's value that is passed in, a copy of the contents of the actual parameter

pass by reference (also called pass by address), a copy of the address of the actual parameter is stored

Some time it gives illusion pass by reference.lets see how it works by example

public class Passbyvalue {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        test t=new test();
        t.name="initialvalue";
        new Passbyvalue().changeValue(t);
        System.out.println(t.name);
    }

    public void changeValue(test f){
        f.name="changevalue";
    }
}

class test{
    String name;
}

Output of this program is

changevalue

lets understand step by step

test t=new test();

as we all know it will create object in heap and return return reference value back to t. suppose for example value of t is 0x100234(its JVM internal value as we don't about it i have just consider it for example)

enter image description here

new Passbyvalue().changeValue(t);

when passing reference t to function it will not directly pass actual reference value of object test but it will create copy of t and then it pass to function ( as it pass by value it passes copy of variable not actual reference of it) . As we consider value of t will be0x100234 . so in this way both t and f will have same value and hence they will point to same object

enter image description here

so if you change any thing in function using reference f it will modify existing contain of object that why we were getting output "changevalue" which is updated in function

to understand this more clearly consider following example

public class Passbyvalue {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        test t=new test();
        t.name="initialvalue";
        new Passbyvalue().changerefence(t);
        System.out.println(t.name);
    }

    public void changerefence(test f){
        f=null;
    }
}

class test{
    String name;
}

will it give null pointer no because it passes only copy of reference .In case of by reference it could have given nullpointer exception

enter image description here

Hopefully this will help

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I have created a thread devoted to these kind of questions for any programming languages here.

Java is also mentioned. Here is the short summary:

  • Java passes it parameters by value
  • "by value" is the only way in java to pass a parameter to a method
  • using methods from the object given as parameter will alter the object as the references point to the original objects. (if that method itself alters some values)
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Have a look at this code. This code will not throw NullPointerException... It will print "Vinay"

public class Main {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        String temp = "Vinay";
        print(temp);
        System.err.println(temp);
    }

    private static void print(String temp) {
        temp = null;
    }
}

If Java is pass by reference then it should have thrown NullPointerException as reference is set to Null.

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1  
Doesn't answer the question. The OP is asking for an explanation, not just a proof. –  EJP Aug 2 '13 at 10:04

Java is pass by constant reference where a copy of the reference is passed which means that it is basically a pass by value. You might change the contents of the reference if the class is mutable but you cannot change the reference itself. In other words the address can not be changed since it is passed by value but the content that is pointed by the address can be changed. In case of immutable classes, the content of the reference cannot be changed either.

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In java everything is reference, so when you have something like: Point pnt1 = new Point(0,0); Java does following:

  1. Creates new Point object
  2. Creates new Point reference and initialize that reference to point (refer to) on previously created Point object.
  3. From here, through Point object life, you will access to that object through pnt1 reference. So we can say that in Java you manipulate object through its reference.

enter image description here

Java doesn't pass method arguments by reference; it passes them by value. I will use example from this site: http://www.javaworld.com/javaqa/2000-05/03-qa-0526-pass.html

public void tricky(Point arg1, Point arg2) {
  arg1.x = 100;
  arg1.y = 100;
  Point temp = arg1;
  arg1 = arg2;
  arg2 = temp;
}
public static void main(String [] args) {
  Point pnt1 = new Point(0,0);
  Point pnt2 = new Point(0,0);
  System.out.println("X1: " + pnt1.x + " Y1: " +pnt1.y); 
  System.out.println("X2: " + pnt2.x + " Y2: " +pnt2.y);
  System.out.println(" ");
  tricky(pnt1,pnt2);
  System.out.println("X1: " + pnt1.x + " Y1:" + pnt1.y); 
  System.out.println("X2: " + pnt2.x + " Y2: " +pnt2.y);  
}

Flow of the program:

Point pnt1 = new Point(0,0);
Point pnt2 = new Point(0,0);

Creating two different Point object with two different reference associated. enter image description here

System.out.println("X1: " + pnt1.x + " Y1: " +pnt1.y); 
System.out.println("X2: " + pnt2.x + " Y2: " +pnt2.y);
System.out.println(" ");

As expected output will be:

X1: 0     Y1: 0
X2: 0     Y2: 0

On this line 'pass-by-value' goes into the play...

tricky(pnt1,pnt2);           public void tricky(Point arg1, Point arg2);

References pnt1 and pnt2 are passed by value to the tricky method, which means that now yours references pnt1 and pnt2 have their copies named arg1 and arg2.So pnt1 and arg1 points to the same object. (Same for the pnt2 and arg2) enter image description here

In the tricky method:

 arg1.x = 100;
 arg1.y = 100;

enter image description here

Next in the tricky method

Point temp = arg1;
arg1 = arg2;
arg2 = temp;

Here, you first create new temp Point reference which will point on same place like arg1 reference. Then you move reference arg1 to point to the same place like arg2 reference. Finally arg2 will point to the same place like temp.

enter image description here

From here scope of tricky method is gone and you don't have access any more to the references: arg1, arg2, temp. But important note is that everything you do with these references when they are 'in life' will permanently affect object on which they are point to.

So after executing method tricky, when you return to main, you have this situation: enter image description here

So now, completely execution of program will be:

X1: 0         Y1: 0
X2: 0         Y2: 0
X1: 100       Y1: 100
X2: 0         Y2: 0
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I always think of it as "pass by copy". It is a copy of the value be it primitive or reference. If it is a primitive it is a copy of the bits that are the value and if it is an Object it is a copy of the reference.

public class PassByCopy{
    public static void changeName(Dog d){
        d.name = "Fido";
    }
    public static void main(String[] args){
        Dog d = new Dog("Maxx");
        System.out.println("name= "+ d.name);
        changeName(d);
        System.out.println("name= "+ d.name);
    }
}
class Dog{
    public String name;
    public Dog(String s){
        this.name = s;
    }
}

output of java PassByCopy:

name= Maxx
name= Fido

Primitive wrapper classes and Strings are immutable so any example using those types will not work the same as other types/objects.

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Java copies the reference by value. So if you change it to something else (e.g, using new) the reference does not change outside the method. For native types, it is always pass by value.

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It's really quite, quite simple:

For a variable of primitive type (eg. int, boolean, char, etc...), when you use its name for a method argument, you are passing the value contained in it (5, true, or 'c'). This value gets "copied", and the variable retains its value even after the method invocation.

For a variable of reference type (eg. String, Object, etc...), when you use its name for a method argument, you are passing the value contained in it (the reference value that "points" to the object). This reference value gets "copied", and the variable retains its value even after the method invocation. The reference variable keeps "pointing" to the same object.

Either way, you're always passing stuff by value.


Compare this to say C++ where you can have a method to take an int&, or in C# where you could have take a ref int (although, in this case, you also have to use the ref modifier when passing the variable's name to the method.)

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As many people mentioned it before, Java is always pass-by-value

Here is another example that will help you understand the difference (the classic swap example):

public class Test {
  public static void main(String[] args) {
    Integer a = new Integer(2);
    Integer b = new Integer(3);
    System.out.println("Before: a = " + a + ", b = " + b);
    swap(a,b);
    System.out.println("After: a = " + a + ", b = " + b);
  }

  public static swap(Integer iA, Integer iB) {
    Integer tmp = iA;
    iA = iB;
    iB = tmp;
  }
}

Prints:

Before: a = 2, b = 3
After: a = 2, b = 3

This happens because iA and iB are new local reference variables that have the same value of the passed references (they point to a and b respectively). So, trying to change the references of iA or iB will only change in the local scope and not outside of this method.

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To make a long story short, Java objects have some very peculiar properties.

In general, Java has primitive types (int, bool, char, double, etc) that are passed directly by value. Then Java has objects (everything that derives from java.lang.Object). Objects are actually always handled through a reference (a reference being a pointer that you can't touch). That means that in effect, objects are passed by reference, as the references are normally not interesting. It does however mean that you cannot change which object is pointed to as the reference itself is passed by value.

Does this sound strange and confusing? Let's consider how C implements pass by reference and pass by value. In C, the default convention is pass by value. void foo(int x) passes an int by value. void foo(int *x) is a function that does not want an int a, but a pointer to an int: foo(&a). One would use this with the & operator to pass a variable address.

Take this to C++, and we have references. References are basically (in this context) syntactic sugar that hide the pointer part of the equation: void foo(int &x) is called by foo(a), where the compiler itself knows that it is a reference and the address of the non-reference a should be passed. In Java, all variables referring to objects are actually of reference type, in effect forcing call by reference for most intends and purposes without the fine grained control (and complexity) afforded by, for example, C++.

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Java passes parameters by value, but for object variables, the values are essentially references to objects. Since arrays are objects the following example code shows the difference.

public static void dummyIncrease(int[] x, int y)
{
    x[0]++;
    y++;
}
public static void main(String[] args)
{
    int[] arr = {3, 4, 5};
    int b = 1;
    dummyIncrease(arr, b);
    // arr[0] is 4, but b is still 1
}

main()
  arr +---+       +---+---+---+
      | # | ----> | 3 | 4 | 5 |
      +---+       +---+---+---+
  b   +---+             ^
      | 1 |             | 
      +---+             |
                        |
dummyIncrease()         |
  x   +---+             |
      | # | ------------+
      +---+      
  y   +---+ 
      | 1 | 
      +---+ 
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Everything is passed by value. Primitives and Object references. But objects can be changed, if their interface allows it.

When you pass an object to a method, you are passing a reference, and the object can be modified by the method implementation.

void bithday(Person p) {
    p.age++;
}

The reference of the object itself, is passed by value: you can reassign the parameter, but the change is not reflected back:

void renameToJon(Person p) { 
    p = new Person("Jon"); // this will not work
}

jack = new Person("Jack");
renameToJon(jack);
sysout(jack); // jack is unchanged

As matter of effect, "p" is reference (pointer to the object) and can't be changed.

Primitive types are passed by value. Object's reference can be considered a primitive type too.

To recap, everything is passed by value.

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A reference is always a value when represented, no matter what language you use.

Getting an outside of the box view, let's look at Assembly or some low level memory management. At the CPU level a reference to anything immediately becomes a value if it gets written to memory or to one of the CPU registers. (That is why pointer is a good definition. It is a value, which has a purpose at the same time).

Data in memory has a Location and at that location there is a value (byte,word, whatever). In Assembly we have a convenient solution to give a Name to certain Location (aka variable), but when compiling the code, the assembler simply replaces Name with the designated location just like your browser replaces domain names with IP addresses.

Down to the core it is technically impossible to pass a reference to anything in any language without representing it (when it immediately becomes a value).

Lets say we have a variable Foo, its Location is at the 47th byte in memory and its Value is 5. We create another variable Ref which is at 223rd byte in memory, and its value will be 47. If you just look at 5 and 47 without any other information, you will see two Values. To reach to 5 we have to travel:

[223] -> 47
[47] -> 5

If we want to call a method/function/procedure with Foo's value, there are a few possible way to pass the variable to the method:

  1. 5 gets copied to one of the CPU registers (ie. EAX).
  2. 5 gets PUSHd to the stack.
  3. 47 gets copied to one of the CPU registers
  4. 47 PUSHd to the stack.
  5. 223 gets copied to one of the CPU registers.
  6. 223 gets PUSHd to the stack.

In every cases above a value - a copy of a value - has been created, it is now upto the method to handle it. When you write "Foo" inside the method, it is either read out from EAX, or automatically dereferenced, or double dereferenced. This is hidden from the developer until she circumvents the dereferencing process. So a reference is a value when represented, because a reference is a value that has to be processed (even though at CPU level).

We have Foo inside the method:

  • in case 1. and 2. if you change Foo (Foo = 9) it only affects local scope. (you have a copy of the Value), from inside the method we cannot even determine where in memory Foo is located.
  • in case 3. and 4. if you use default language constructs and change Foo (Foo = 11), it could change Foo globally (depends on the language, ie. Java or like Pascal's procedure findMin(x, y, z: integer;var m: integer);). However if the language allows you to circumvent the dereference process, you can change 47, say to 49. At that point if you modify Foo inside the method (Foo = 12) you will probably FUBAR the program because you will write to a different memory area (and not at 47). BUT Foo's 47 did not change globally, only the Foo's inside the method, because 47 was also a copy to the method.
  • in case 4. and 5. if you modify 223 it will only create local mayhem, however if you are able to dereference 223 and modify 47, it will affect Foo globally, because you have only a copy of 223, but 47 was never copied/saved.

Nitpicking on insignificant details, even languages that do pass-by-reference will pass values to functions, but those functions know that they have to use it for dereferencing purposes. This pass-the-reference-as-value is just hidden from the programmer because it is practically useless and the terminology is only pass-by-reference.

Strict pass-by-value is also useless, it would mean that a 100 Mbyte array should have to copied every time we call a method with the array as argument, therefore Java cannot be stricly pass-by-value. Every language would pass a reference to this huge array (as a value) and either employs copy-on-write mechanism if that array can be changed locally inside the method or allows the method (as Java does) to modify the array globally (from the caller's view) and a few languages allows to modify the Value of the reference itself.

So in short and in Java's own terminology, Java is pass-by-value where value can be: either a real value or a value that is a representation of a reference.

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protected by Nick Craver Jun 24 '11 at 18:08

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