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Question: Write a program that asks the user to enter a number of seconds, and works as follows:

  • There are 60 seconds in a minute. If the number of seconds entered by the user is greater than or equal to 60, the program should display the number of minutes in that many seconds.

  • There are 3600 seconds in an hour. If the number of seconds entered by the user is greater than or equal to 3600, the program should display the number of hours in that many seconds.

  • There are 86400 seconds in a day. If the number of seconds entered by the user is greater than or equal to 86400, the program should display the number of days in that many seconds.

What I have so far:

def time():
    sec = int( input ('Enter the number of seconds:'.strip())
    if sec <= 60:
        minutes = sec // 60
        print('The number of minutes is {0:.2f}'.format(minutes)) 
    if sec (<= 3600):
        hours = sec // 3600
        print('The number of minutes is {0:.2f}'.format(hours))
    if sec <= 86400:
        days = sec // 86400
        print('The number of minutes is {0:.2f}'.format(days))
    return
share|improve this question
    
Hint: docs.python.org/library/functions.html#divmod lets you do something like this: divmod(3660,3600) # (1, 60) and divmod(60,60) # (1,0). Also, what exactly are you asking? –  li.davidm Oct 29 '10 at 2:59
    
Write out how you would do it on paper, then turn it into code. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Oct 29 '10 at 3:04
    
Based upon your description, your "if" statements should be '>=', not '<='. –  Garrett Hyde Oct 29 '10 at 3:32

4 Answers 4

This will convert n seconds into d days, h hours, m minutes, and s seconds.

from datetime import datetime, timedelta

def GetTime():
    sec = timedelta(seconds=int(input('Enter the number of seconds: ')))
    d = datetime(1,1,1) + sec

    print("DAYS:HOURS:MIN:SEC")
    print("%d:%d:%d:%d" % (d.day-1, d.hour, d.minute, d.second))
share|improve this answer
    
I believe there is maximum on seconds. So this is not the suggested way. See the documentation: seconds Between 0 and 86399 inclusive docs.python.org/library/datetime.html –  Sam Stoelinga Jun 10 '11 at 10:20
2  
There are 86400 seconds in a day, so that's why you can only have 0-86399 seconds. In other words, timedelta(seconds=86400) would resolve to days=1, seconds=0. Therefore, 86399 is not the maximum input value for seconds. –  Garrett Hyde Jun 14 '11 at 16:34
    
Seems I misunderstood the documentation, if its the way you say. So what you mean is, if I use the following timedelta: timedelta(seconds=86450) it will automatically resolve to timedelta(days=1, seconds=50)? Is that correct? Thanks for your comment. –  Sam Stoelinga Jun 15 '11 at 16:12
    
Yes, that is correct. –  Garrett Hyde Jun 15 '11 at 18:12
3  
If the duration are so long that it changes the month, then this proposal won't work. Try 5184000 (60*24*3600) seconds. –  Rockallite Aug 23 '13 at 1:56

This tidbit is useful for displaying elapsed time to varying degrees of granularity.

I personally think that questions of efficiency are practically meaningless here, so long as something grossly inefficient isn't being done. Premature optimization is the root of quite a bit of evil.

intervals = (
    ('weeks', 604800),  # 60 * 60 * 24 * 7
    ('days', 86400),    # 60 * 60 * 24
    ('hours', 3600),    # 60 * 60
    ('minutes', 60),
    ('seconds', 1),
    )

def display_time(seconds, granularity=2):
    result = []

    for name, count in intervals:
        value = seconds // count
        if value:
            seconds -= value * count
            if value == 1:
                name = name.rstrip('s')
            result.append("{} {}".format(value, name))
    return ', '.join(result[:granularity])

..and this provides decent output:

In [52]: display_time(1934815)
Out[52]: '3 weeks, 1 day'

In [53]: display_time(1934815, 4)
Out[53]: '3 weeks, 1 day, 9 hours, 26 minutes'
share|improve this answer

At first glance, I figured divmod would be faster since it's a single statement and a built-in function, but timeit seems to show otherwise. Consider this little example I came up with when I was trying to figure out the fastest method for use in a loop that continuously runs in a gobject idle_add splitting a seconds counter into a human readable time for updating a progress bar label.

import timeit

def test1(x,y, dropy):
    while x > 0:
        y -= dropy
        x -= 1

        # the test
        minutes = (y-x) / 60
        seconds = (y-x) % 60.0

def test2(x,y, dropy):
    while x > 0:
        y -= dropy
        x -= 1

        # the test
        minutes, seconds = divmod((y-x), 60)

x = 55     # litte number, also number of tests
y = 10000  # make y > x by factor of drop
dropy = 7 # y is reduced this much each iteration, for variation

print "division and modulus:", timeit.timeit( lambda: test1(x,y,dropy) )
print "divmod function:",      timeit.timeit( lambda: test2(x,y,dropy) )

The built-in divmod function seems incredibly slower compared to using the simple division and modulus.

division and modulus: 12.5737669468
divmod function: 17.2861430645
share|improve this answer

Do it the other way around subtracting the secs as needed, and don't call it time; there's a package with that name:

def sec_to_time():
    sec = int( input ('Enter the number of seconds:'.strip()) )

    days = sec / 86400
    sec -= 86400*days

    hrs = sec / 3600
    sec -= 3600*hrs

    mins = sec / 60
    sec -= 60*mins
    print days, ':', hrs, ':', min, ':', sec
share|improve this answer
2  
Doesn't quite fulfill the requirements. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Oct 29 '10 at 3:06

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