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I get an UnboundLocalError because I use a template value inside an if statement which is not executed. What is the standard way to handle this situation?

class Test(webapp.RequestHandler):
    def get(self):      
        user = users.get_current_user()
        if user:
            greeting = ('Hello, ' + user.nickname())
        else:
            self.redirect(users.create_login_url(self.request.uri))
...

        template_values = {"greeting": greeting,
                       }

Error:

UnboundLocalError: local variable 'greeting' referenced before assignment
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2  
Is there some reason you can't just do greeting = None (or a reasonable default) before the if ... else bit? –  Joe Kington Oct 29 '10 at 3:27
    
Thanks. I did not know. –  Zeynel Oct 29 '10 at 3:34
1  
I don't know webapp, but I expect you want to do return self.redirect... anyway. –  Daniel Roseman Oct 29 '10 at 8:07
    
@Daniel Roseman: Sorry, I don't understand what return self.redirect does. Can you explain? I used greeting=None as suggested by Joe Kington and that works. Thanks. –  Zeynel Oct 29 '10 at 15:45
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Just Switch:

class Test(webapp.RequestHandler):
    def err_user_not_found(self):
        self.redirect(users.create_login_url(self.request.uri))
    def get(self):      
        user = users.get_current_user()
        # error path
        if not user:
            self.err_user_not_found()
            return

        # happy path
        greeting = ('Hello, ' + user.nickname())
        ...
        template_values = {"greeting": greeting,}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer. I used greeting=None for now; but when I am ready to deploy the app I may use this version. What does return do? Why is it necessary? –  Zeynel Oct 29 '10 at 15:51
    
@Zeynel It exits from the routine, otherwise the interpreter will continue executing all the following statements. –  fabrizioM Oct 29 '10 at 18:19
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I guess I need to explain the problem first: in creating template_values, you use a greeting variable. This variable will not be set if there is no user.

There isn't a standard way to handle this situation. Common approaches are:

1. make sure that the variable is initialized in every code path (in your case: including the else case)
2. initialize the variable to some reasonable default value at the beginning
3. return from the function in the code paths which cannot provide a value for the variable.

Like Daniel, I suspect that after the redirect call, you are not supposed to produce any output, anyway, so the corrected code might read

class Test(webapp.RequestHandler):
  def get(self):      
    user = users.get_current_user()
    if user:
        greeting = ('Hello, ' + user.nickname())
    else:
        self.redirect(users.create_login_url(self.request.uri))
        return
...

    template_values = {"greeting": greeting,
                   }
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. It seemed the second option is the easiest so I chose greeting=None. Why is return necessary? –  Zeynel Oct 29 '10 at 15:53
1  
self.redirect will only instruct webapp to send a redirect - it is a regular function and cannot really abort the execution of get() (except when it would raise an exception). So if you don't want to / must no perform any further action after the redirect, you really should return from the get right away, and avoid performing more activity (which then is either incorrect or unneeded). –  Martin v. Löwis Oct 29 '10 at 17:08
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