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I have a simple model class (UserAddress) that is not being passed properly to the HttpPost function. The data always has null values for all the member data.

public class User
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
}

public class Address
{
    public string Address1;
    public string Address2;
}

public class UserAddress
{
    public User User;
    public Address Address;

    public UserAddress()
    {
        User = new User();
        Address = new Address();
    }
}

And a simple view:

<table>
    <tr>
        <td>
            <%: Html.LabelFor(model => model.User.Name) %>
        </td>
        <td>
            <%: Html.TextBoxFor(model => model.User.Name) %>
            <%: Html.ValidationMessageFor(model => model.User.Name) %>
        </td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td>
            <%: Html.LabelFor(model => model.Address.Address1)%>
        </td>
        <td>
            <%: Html.TextBoxFor(model => model.Address.Address1)%>
            <%: Html.ValidationMessageFor(model => model.Address.Address1)%>
        </td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td>
            <%: Html.LabelFor(model => model.Address.Address2)%>
        </td>
        <td>
            <%: Html.TextBoxFor(model => model.Address.Address2)%>
            <%: Html.ValidationMessageFor(model => model.Address.Address2)%>
        </td>
    </tr>
</table>

And here's the code:

 public ActionResult Index()
    {
        UserAddress userAddress = new UserAddress();

        return View(userAddress);
    }

    [HttpPost]
    public ActionResult Index(UserAddress userAddress)
    {
        return View(userAddress);
    }

All the member variables are null; such as userAddress.User.Name.

share|improve this question
    
I hope you have specified model binding in your view like this System.Web.Mvc.ViewPage<UserAddress>. –  Pradeep Oct 29 '10 at 4:30
    
True, but if he didn't, his code would give a runtime error, not a null http post. –  RPM1984 Oct 29 '10 at 4:35

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The only thing that stands out for me is that you are attempting to bind public members, not properties.

Perhaps try refactoring your classes to use properties and try that.

public class Address
{
    public string Address1 { get; set; }
    public string Address2 { get; set; }
}

public class UserAddress
{
    public User User { get; set; }
    public Address Address { get; set; }

    public UserAddress()
    {
        User = new User();
        Address = new Address();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
i was about to post that answer, but thought it was too obvious. surely... –  RPM1984 Oct 29 '10 at 4:39
    
I tried that but the inner classes. But hadn't tried that for the UserAddress class. Duhhhh. –  dvallejo Oct 29 '10 at 22:45
    
This was my problem. I kiss you! –  masty Apr 12 '11 at 5:08

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