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This is confusing to me please expalin me the behaviour of this?

A declaration of a new member hides an inherited member only within the scope of the new member. Copy

**class Base
{
   public static void F() {}
}
class Derived: Base
{
   new private static void F() {}   // Hides Base.F in Derived only
}
class MoreDerived: Derived
{
   static void G() { F(); }         // Invokes Base.F
}**

In the example above, the declaration of F in Derived hides the F that was inherited from Base, but since the new F in Derived has private access, its scope does not extend to MoreDerived. Thus, the call F() in MoreDerived.G is valid and will invoke Base.F.

I am not understanding that how static void G() { F(); } can access the base class f method when it can access all methods of it's immediate super class and super class hides the f method of base class

share|improve this question
    
It can't invoke Derived::F(), because that method is private. Outside of Derived, Derived::F() may as well not exist at all. You may need to change your example a bit, unless that makes everything work -- in which case, you have your answer. –  cHao Oct 29 '10 at 5:50

2 Answers 2

up vote 10 down vote accepted

MoreDerived cannot access all methods of its super class; in particular, it cannot access private methods. In C#, anything marked private in a class is invisible to anything outside of that class. In other words, adding or removing a private method will not change how anything outside of that class compiles. Since the new private static void F is invisible to the outside world, MoreDerived is unaffected by it.

If the modifier was protected instead, MoreDerived would see it.

In the example you gave, the new keyword only changes the meaning of names in the namespace. It does not change what methods are available. A method of Derived can still call Base.F() like so:

class Derived: Base 
{ 
   new private static void F()
   {
       F();      // calls Derived.F()
       Base.F(); // calls Base.F()
   }
} 

class MoreDerived: Derived 
{ 
   static void G() 
   {
       F();         // Invokes Base.F
       Derived.F(); // Invokes Base.F because Derived.F is private
       Base.F();    // Invokes Base.F
   }
}

It's analogous to this example:

class Foo
{
    int bar; // in most methods, this variable can be accessed as just "bar"

    Foo(int bar) // this parameter will hide the instance member bar
    {
        this.bar = bar; // instance method can still be accessed, though
    }
}
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Faster on the gun, guess I don't have to finish my paragraph. :) +1 –  GalacticJello Oct 29 '10 at 5:50
    
that's ok but how the morederived class can have access to the base class method when it is not available to it's immediate super class that is only my confusion –  NoviceToDotNet Oct 29 '10 at 5:55
    
@NoviceToDotNet : See my answers for your above comment –  Saurabh Oct 29 '10 at 6:01
    
NoviceToDotNet: If you see my edits, the F method of Base is still accessible to Derived, just not without qualification. –  Gabe Oct 29 '10 at 6:06
    
But here i am not using any qualificationstatic void G() { F(); } so how is it possible to acces base class method very confusing sir please explain me –  NoviceToDotNet Oct 29 '10 at 6:15

'new' keyword will hide the base member if it is allowded to be access outside the class.

But due to the inheritance chain MoreDerived : Derived : Base , you will see the public members of immeditae base or the higher base classes in the chain.

Method hiding is not equal to the private modifier on a method.

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see hiding means that the base class method is hidden in the derived class bcas of NEW kwy word in derived class. Now it is not acccessible to out side world. So how is this available to moreDerived class this is only my Question –  NoviceToDotNet Oct 29 '10 at 6:10
    
Due to the inheritance chain MoreDerived:Derived:Base , so now if you hide base's F method in derived and make it private so in the more dervied class there is nothing public that it can see in its immediate parent (Derived) thus it ladder up the chain and see if any other class is having F() and in your case yes it is Base , so compiler makes it avaliable for you. –  Saurabh Oct 29 '10 at 6:15
    
but a i am gain confuse with this that a derived class can see in it's immediate super class so how can moreDerived class can go to the base class please explain me sir –  NoviceToDotNet Oct 29 '10 at 6:18
    
MoreDerived can access static methods from both Base and Derived. When it accesses F, it gets the one inherited from Derived, which is the F inherited from Base because Derived.F is private. –  Gabe Oct 29 '10 at 6:36
    
so n conclusion i shud say that in the derived class both the methods are available but the prviate key word limites the access of the derived class method but the base classmethod is inherited to moreDerived class m i correct? But i am uncler whih what is the need of shadowing with the NEW key word in derived class in general i want to know y we will shadowing in any case. And if i remove the private from the derived class method then moreDerived will have access to both method of base class and derived class please explain me –  NoviceToDotNet Oct 29 '10 at 6:47

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