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I have a project containing a xaml ResourceDictionary that I wish to use outside of a FrameworkElement. The resource dictionary will contain a DataTemplate for a class local to the project to avoid polluting the app.xaml (as the project is a prism module, and will not always be present depending on config).

So, I have a test.xaml file with a Resource build action.

This is intended to supply the DataTemplate for a TestObject class.

In the TestObject class I have a GetTemplate() method

The following works:

DataTemplate GetTemplate()
{
    Uri uri = new Uri("MyProject;component/test.xaml", UriKind.Relative);

    var dict = new ResourceDictionary { Source = uri};

    return (DataTemplate)dict["TestObjectDataTemplate"];
}

This throws an exception when I assign the uri to the ResourceDictionary.Source property

DataTemplate GetTemplate()
{
    Uri uri = new Uri("/test.xaml", UriKind.Relative);

    var dict = new ResourceDictionary { Source = uri};

    return (DataTemplate)dict["TestObjectDataTemplate"];
}

The second example fails as the /test.xaml can't be found in the local assembly. Why would I need to access it with "ReferencedAssembly;component/test.xaml" ?

In this instance, does local assembly mean the executing assembly or the assembly the code/resource is part of?

Edit: Updated to reflect the actual issue.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Try UriKind.RelativeOrAbsolute.

More clearly like.

    DataTemplate GetTemplate()
    {           
        ResourceDictionary resource = new ResourceDictionary()
        {
            Source = new Uri(@"/AssemblyFullName;component/test.xaml", UriKind.RelativeOrAbsolute)
        };

        return (DataTemplate)resource["TestObjectDataTemplate"];
    }

Edit:

In this instance, does local assembly mean the executing assembly or the assembly the code/resource is part of?

Say for example:
You have two projects Project A and Project B.

You are using Project A as reference in Project B

Now, if you want to use the resource like this /test.xaml. Then, this resource should reside in the Project B. Since, it is the executing assembly. [It will be available for both Project A as well as Project B. You could use the above mentioned syntax. like /test.xaml]

If you want the resource to be defined and used inside Project A. Then, you should use "/ProjectA;component/test.xaml" because it is not the current executing assembly. [It will be available for both Project A as well as Project B. You have to use "/ProjectA;component/test.xaml" this to access in both the projects]

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I've edited the question to describe the problem more accurately. A relative uri works fine, the issue is that I have to refer to name of the assembly, despite the msdn docs implying that a "local assembly" shouldn't need this. –  LukeN Oct 29 '10 at 9:41
    
@LukeN I have updated my answer for your edit. :) –  Prince Ashitaka Nov 3 '10 at 4:00
    
This is it. The problem is that msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa970069.aspx says local assembly and not executing assembly. I've since discovered that someone else found it misleading as well - geekswithblogs.net/NewThingsILearned/archive/2008/04/30/… whereas in your example what I expected was that if I tried to load a Project A reference in code that lives in Project A, I wouldn't need to specify the name. On reflection, I understand why you might want this behaviour, but it was poorly described. –  LukeN Nov 11 '10 at 5:40

Setting the Source attr works, I successfully used it in many projects.
Your Uri might be wrong. You should try a fully qualified pack Uri, like :

dict.Source = new Uri("pack://application:,,,/test.xaml");

If your test.xaml file is not in the project root, be sure to set its path correctly.

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