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I need to find a fairly efficient way to detect syllables in a word. E.g.,

Invisible -> in-vi-sib-le

There are some syllabification rules that could be used:

V CV VC CVC CCV CCCV CVCC

*where V is a vowel and C is a consonant. E.g.,

Pronunciation (5 Pro-nun-ci-a-tion; CV-CVC-CV-V-CVC)

I've tried few methods, among which were using regex (which helps only if you want to count syllables) or hard coded rule definition (a brute force approach which proves to be very inefficient) and finally using a finite state automata (which did not result with anything useful).

The purpose of my application is to create a dictionary of all syllables in a given language. This dictionary will later be used for spell checking applications (using Bayesian classifiers) and text to speech synthesis.

I would appreciate if one could give me tips on an alternate way to solve this problem besides my previous approaches.

I work in Java, but any tip in C/C++, C#, Python, Perl... would work for me.

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Do you actually want the actual division points or just the number of syllables in a word? If the latter, consider looking up the words in a text-to-speech dictionary and count the phonemes that encode vowel sounds. –  Adrian McCarthy Aug 24 '12 at 22:08
    
The most efficient way (computation-wise; not storage-wise), I would guess would be just to have a Python dictionary with words as keys and the number of syllables as values. However, you'd still need a fallback for words that didn't make it in the dictionary. Let me know if you ever find such a dictionary! –  Shule Jul 29 '14 at 5:33

9 Answers 9

up vote 70 down vote accepted

Read about the TeX approach to this problem for the purposes of hyphenation. Especially see Frank Liang's thesis dissertation Word Hy-phen-a-tion by Com-put-er. His algorithm is very accurate, and then includes a small exceptions dictionary for cases where the algorithm does not work.

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18  
I like that youve cited a thesis dissertation on the subject, it's a little hint to the original poster that this might not be an easy question. –  Karl Jan 1 '09 at 17:29
    
Yes, I am aware that this is not a simple question, although I haven't worked much on it. I did underestimate the problem though, I thought I would work on other parts of my app, and later return to this 'simple' problem. Silly me :) –  user50705 Jan 1 '09 at 17:33
    
I read the disertation paper, and found it very helpful. The problem with the approach was that I did not have any patterns for the Albanian language, although I found some tools that could generate those patterns. Anyway, for my purpose I wrote a rule based app, which solved the problem... –  user50705 Jan 3 '09 at 1:20
    
... My approach is a bit slow (~20 sec on a 50K word file) but I think the results are reasonably accurate (i dont have any useful stats yet). –  user50705 Jan 3 '09 at 1:24
2  
Note that the TeX algorithm is for finding legitimate hyphenation points, which is not exactly the same as syllable divisions. It's true that hyphenation points fall on syllable divisions, but not all syllable divisions are valid hyphenation points. For example, hyphens aren't (usually) used within a letter or two of either end of a word. I also believe the TeX patterns were tuned to trade off false negatives for false positives (never put a hyphen where it doesn't belong, even if that means missing some legitimate hyphenation opportunities). –  Adrian McCarthy Aug 24 '12 at 22:05

I stumbled across this page looking for the same thing, and found a few implementations of the Liang paper here: http://code.google.com/p/hyphenator/

That is unless you're the type that enjoys reading a 60 page thesis instead of adapting freely available code for non-unique problem. :)

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agreed - much more convenient to just use an existing implmentation –  hoju Nov 5 '10 at 2:48
1  
The repository has been moved to github.com/mnater/hyphenator –  cheffe May 26 at 8:18

Here is a solution using NLTK:

from nltk.corpus import cmudict
d = cmudict.dict()
def nsyl(word):
  return [len(list(y for y in x if y[-1].isdigit())) for x in d[word.lower()]] 
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Hey thanks tiny baby error in the should be function def nsyl(word): return [len(list(y for y in x if y[-1].isdigit())) for x in d[word.lower()]] –  Gourneau Dec 21 '10 at 1:08
    
thanks Gourneau! –  hoju Dec 21 '10 at 23:52
2  
What would you suggest as a fallback for words that aren't in that corpus? –  Dan Gayle Jun 18 '11 at 0:18
    
How does this work? –  Pureferret Mar 16 at 9:21

I'm trying to tackle this problem for a program that will calculate the flesch-kincaid and flesch reading score of a block of text. My algorithm uses what I found on this website: http://www.howmanysyllables.com/howtocountsyllables.html and it gets reasonably close. It still has trouble on complicated words like invisible and hyphenation, but I've found it gets in the ballpark for my purposes.

It has the upside of being easy to implement. I found the "es" can be either syllabic or not. It's a gamble, but I decided to remove the es in my algorithm.

private int CountSyllables(string word)
    {
        char[] vowels = { 'a', 'e', 'i', 'o', 'u', 'y' };
        string currentWord = word;
        int numVowels = 0;
        bool lastWasVowel = false;
        foreach (char wc in currentWord)
        {
            bool foundVowel = false;
            foreach (char v in vowels)
            {
                //don't count diphthongs
                if (v == wc && lastWasVowel)
                {
                    foundVowel = true;
                    lastWasVowel = true;
                    break;
                }
                else if (v == wc && !lastWasVowel)
                {
                    numVowels++;
                    foundVowel = true;
                    lastWasVowel = true;
                    break;
                }
            }

            //if full cycle and no vowel found, set lastWasVowel to false;
            if (!foundVowel)
                lastWasVowel = false;
        }
        //remove es, it's _usually? silent
        if (currentWord.Length > 2 && 
            currentWord.Substring(currentWord.Length - 2) == "es")
            numVowels--;
        // remove silent e
        else if (currentWord.Length > 1 &&
            currentWord.Substring(currentWord.Length - 1) == "e")
            numVowels--;

        return numVowels;
    }
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Why calculate it? Every online dictionary has this info. http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/invisible in·vis·i·ble

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3  
Maybe it has to work for words that don't appear in dictionaries, such as names? –  Wouter Lievens Sep 13 '10 at 19:13
4  
@WouterLievens: I don't think names are anywhere near well-behaved enough for automatic syllable parsing. A syllable parser for English names would fail miserably on names of Welsh or Scottish origin, let alone names of Indian and Nigerian origins, yet you might find all of these in a single room somewhere in e.g. London. –  Jean-François Corbett Jan 14 '12 at 14:06
    
One must keep in mind that it is not reasonable to expect better performance than a human could provide considering this is a purely heuristic approach to a sketchy domain. –  Darren Ringer 20 hours ago

This is a particularly difficult problem which is not completely solved by the LaTeX hyphenation algorithm. A good summary of some available methods and the challenges involved can be found in the paper Evaluating Automatic Syllabification Algorithms for English (Marchand, Adsett, and Damper 2007).

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Perl has Lingua::Phonology::Syllable module. You might try that, or try looking into its algorithm. I saw a few other older modules there, too.

I don't understand why a regular expression gives you only a count of syllables. You should be able to get the syllables themselves using capture parentheses. Assuming you can construct a regular expression that works, that is.

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Thanks Joe Basirico, for sharing your quick and dirty implementation in C#. I've used the big libraries, and they work, but they're usually a bit slow, and for quick projects, your method works fine.

Here is your code in Java, along with test cases:

public static int countSyllables(String word)
{
    char[] vowels = { 'a', 'e', 'i', 'o', 'u', 'y' };
    char[] currentWord = word.toCharArray();
    int numVowels = 0;
    boolean lastWasVowel = false;
    for (char wc : currentWord) {
        boolean foundVowel = false;
        for (char v : vowels)
        {
            //don't count diphthongs
            if ((v == wc) && lastWasVowel)
            {
                foundVowel = true;
                lastWasVowel = true;
                break;
            }
            else if (v == wc && !lastWasVowel)
            {
                numVowels++;
                foundVowel = true;
                lastWasVowel = true;
                break;
            }
        }
        // If full cycle and no vowel found, set lastWasVowel to false;
        if (!foundVowel)
            lastWasVowel = false;
    }
    // Remove es, it's _usually? silent
    if (word.length() > 2 && 
            word.substring(word.length() - 2) == "es")
        numVowels--;
    // remove silent e
    else if (word.length() > 1 &&
            word.substring(word.length() - 1) == "e")
        numVowels--;
    return numVowels;
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
    String txt = "what";
    System.out.println("txt="+txt+" countSyllables="+countSyllables(txt));
    txt = "super";
    System.out.println("txt="+txt+" countSyllables="+countSyllables(txt));
    txt = "Maryland";
    System.out.println("txt="+txt+" countSyllables="+countSyllables(txt));
    txt = "American";
    System.out.println("txt="+txt+" countSyllables="+countSyllables(txt));
    txt = "disenfranchized";
    System.out.println("txt="+txt+" countSyllables="+countSyllables(txt));
    txt = "Sophia";
    System.out.println("txt="+txt+" countSyllables="+countSyllables(txt));
}

The result was as expected (it works good enough for Flesch-Kincaid):

txt=what countSyllables=1
txt=super countSyllables=2
txt=Maryland countSyllables=3
txt=American countSyllables=3
txt=disenfranchized countSyllables=5
txt=Sophia countSyllables=2
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You can find here http://www.ushuaia.pl/hyphen/?ln=en all that you are looking for. Hunspell is a lin­guis­tic tool used in many programs, like Open­Office or Adobe Indesign. The hyphe­na­tion algo­rithm is based on TeX system. On the link you will find an implementation in c sharp , java , Delphi, Android etc/

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