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I want to make my classes have parametr ID which identificate this class. For example I want something like this:

class Car
{
   public static virtual string ID{get{return "car";}}
}

class SuperCar : Car
{
    public static override string ID{get{return "superCar";}}
}

Car a = new Car();
//a.ID == car
a = new SuperCar();
//a.ID = superCar

Do you think there is any why to make something like that ? I now I can't make virutal static :/

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in your example, you're accessing the ID as non-static, instance-level properties, which I think is exactly what you need to be doing as that provides the polymorphic behavior you're looking for. I'm not sure I understand why you're trying to make the property static in the first place? –  Steven Oct 29 '10 at 17:41
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6 Answers

I may be being dense, but what you've written down is exactly what you'd get if you were not using static methods. You seem to be asking "How do I make static methods act like instance methods". The answer is...use instance methods and normal polymorphism?

If this is just to get an identifier for the class, the GetType() member will suffice.

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Adam Wright hits on a good point here. Statics are not polymorphic, but it looks like the behavior being sought is that of polymorphism.

The problem seems to be that since statics exist at the class level rather than the instance level, you can't utilize polymorphism because you're not dealing with an instance which may override the behavior.

Some confusion may coming from the fact that your sample code looks like it's trying to treat the property non-statically. when accessing the Car's static ID property, that property is exposed on Car...not instance a. That may seem obivous, but it's important to remember that a call to Car.ID has nothing to do with the type of instance a. So, there's no level of inference that can be drawn from the way instance a was created; i.e. just because instance a happens to be a SuperCar, there's no way to know that the next call to Car.ID should actually be interpretted as a call to SuperCar.ID.

you can simulate polymoprhic behavior of this static property, though, by encapsulating a call to the the respective static property through a virtual instance level property...

Something like this might give you what you're looking for:

class Program
{
    class Car
    {
        // NOTE: this can't have the same name as the static method
        public virtual string CarType     
        {
            get { return ID; }
        }
        public static string ID { get { return "car"; } }
    }

    class SuperCar : Car
    {
        // NOTE: this can't have the same name as the static method
        public override string CarType     
        {
            get { return ID; }
        }
        public static string ID { get { return "super car"; } }
    }

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Car a = new Car();
        Console.WriteLine(a.CarType);
        a = new SuperCar();
        Console.WriteLine(a.CarType);
    }
}
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You can just use a.GetType().Name;

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Thx, it is good solutuion, but I can't make Car id "c" and SuperCar "sc" , and I can't make Car.GetType().Name :/ –  openglNewbie Oct 29 '10 at 17:23
    
You can make typeof(Car).Name –  Andrew Bezzub Oct 29 '10 at 17:24
    
@openglNewbie but you can do typeof(SuperCar).Name –  Klaus Byskov Pedersen Oct 29 '10 at 17:25
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I'm not sure why you'd need to do this when you can simply refer to the type itself.

 var car = new SuperCar();
 if (car is SuperCar)
 {
   ...
 }

or if you need the actual name as text

 var className = car.GetType().Name;
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A better approach to what I think you are trying to do would be to use Attributes.

[MyAttribute("Car")]
public class Car
{ ... }

Now you can use reflection to find all the attributes on your class whether you have a reference to the type, or an instance of it.

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You can just remove the virtual and override keywords in your code and use the new keyword, but I still agree with tvanfosson.

Thus the property is no longer inherited from the parent class it is absolutely new one.

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