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My code for opening an input dialog reads as follows:

final AlertDialog.Builder alert = new AlertDialog.Builder(this);  
alert.setTitle("Dialog Title");  
alert.setMessage("Request information");  
LayoutInflater factory = LayoutInflater.from(this);
final View textEntryView = factory.inflate(R.layout.edittextautotextlayout, null);
final EditText inputBox = (EditText) textEntryView.findViewById(R.id.my_et_layout);
alert.setView(inputBox);

This works fine except that I have to tap the text entry line before the soft keyboard appears.

Following the advice given here I have tried inserting:

inputBox.setOnFocusChangeListener(new View.OnFocusChangeListener() {
    @Override
    public void onFocusChange(View v, boolean hasFocus) {
        if (hasFocus) {
            alert.getWindow().setSoftInputMode( 
               WindowManager.LayoutParams.SOFT_INPUT_STATE_ALWAYS_VISIBLE);
        }
    }
});

but Eclipse objects that "the method getWindow() is not defined for the type AlertDialog.Builder".

It seems that the setOnFocusChangeListener code works for an AlertDialog object but not an AlertDialog.Builder. How should I modify my code to make the soft keyboard appear automatcially.

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11 Answers 11

As long as you always need to show the keyboard immediately once the dialog opens rather than once a specific form widget inside gets focus (for instance, if your dialog just shows an EditText and a button), you can do the following:

AlertDialog alertToShow = alert.create();
alertToShow.getWindow().setSoftInputMode(
    WindowManager.LayoutParams.SOFT_INPUT_STATE_ALWAYS_VISIBLE);
alertToShow.show();

Rather than calling .show() on your builder immediately, you can instead call .create() which allows you to do some extra processing on it before you display it onto the screen.

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2  
Simplest answer, and works perfectly for me. –  Tim Oct 7 '12 at 19:38
    
Where does this code actually go? –  Johnny Aug 9 '14 at 7:22
    
@Johnny This is the code to display the alert, so place it wherever you determine you need to show the alert. It's probably replacing an existing call to alert.show(). –  Defragged Aug 12 '14 at 13:57

This is in response to miannelle.

The following method is called when a menu option is selected:

private void addNote() {
    final Dialog dialog = new Dialog(this);
    dialog.setContentView(R.layout.textentryalertdialog);
    dialog.setTitle("Add note");
    TextView msgText = (TextView) dialog.findViewById(R.id.messagetext);
    msgText.setText("Whatever prompt you want");
    final EditText inputLine = (EditText) dialog.findViewById(R.id.my_edittext);
    Button okButton = (Button) dialog.findViewById(R.id.OKButton);
    okButton.setOnClickListener(new OnClickListener() {
        public void onClick(View arg0) {
            dialog.dismiss();
            // app specific code
        }           
    });
    Button cancelButton = (Button) dialog.findViewById(R.id.CancelButton);
    cancelButton.setOnClickListener(new OnClickListener() {
        public void onClick(View arg0) {
            dialog.dismiss();
        }           
    });
    dialog.getWindow().setSoftInputMode(WindowManager.LayoutParams.SOFT_INPUT_STATE_ALWAYS_VISIBLE);
    dialog.show();
}

The textentryalertdialog.xml file defines a linear layout containing

TextView android:id="@+id/messagetext" ...

EditText android:id="@+id/my_edittext" ...

Button android:id="@+id/OKButton" ...

Button android:id="@+id/CancelButton" ...

I hope this helps.

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1  
Code does not work on device which have a real keyboard (like Moto Droid). Anyone knows how to deal with that? –  Sean Feb 24 '12 at 8:19
up vote 3 down vote accepted

With the encouragement of Mur Votema (see his answer above) I have answered my question by building a custom dialog based on the Dialog class. Unlike an alert based on AlertDialog.Builder such a custom dialog does accept the getWindow().setSoftInputMode(...) command and therefore allows the soft keyboard to be displayed automatically.

For guidance on building a custom dialog I found this web page and this especially helpful.

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Congratulations!!! :) –  Tima Nov 7 '10 at 10:23
    
Thanks again to you and everyone else for your help. :) –  prepbgg Nov 7 '10 at 20:36

try using inputBox

inputBox.getWindow().setSoftInputMode( 
               WindowManager.LayoutParams.SOFT_INPUT_STATE_ALWAYS_VISIBLE);
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Thanks for the suggestion. However, when I try that Eclipse says "the method getWindow() is undefined for type EditText" –  prepbgg Oct 30 '10 at 13:18

try using view

v.getWindow().setSoftInputMode( 
           WindowManager.LayoutParams.SOFT_INPUT_STATE_ALWAYS_VISIBLE);
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Thanks for the suggestion. I tried that, but unfortunately I got the same error message ("the method getWindow() is undefined for the type View") –  prepbgg Oct 30 '10 at 16:20

Have you tried to set focus on your EditText -> inputBox.requestFocus() or something like that?

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1  
Thanks for the suggestion. I tried inserting inputBox.requestFocus(); after alert.setView(inputBox);, but no joy! –  prepbgg Oct 30 '10 at 16:24
    
... and if you try to call requestFocus after alert.create() ? Because first dialog should be created and then edit can get focus, no?! –  Tima Oct 30 '10 at 21:05
    
My code doesn't explicitly call create(). Presumably it is called indirectly by the statement "AlertDialog.Builder alert = new AlertDialog.Builder(this);" which definitely comes before any other reference to alert. –  prepbgg Oct 30 '10 at 21:15
    
but is there show()-method somewhere in your code?! –  Tima Oct 30 '10 at 22:22
1  
With the help of a couple of tutorials (helloandroid.com/tutorials/… and blog.androgames.net/10/custom-android-dialog) I've created a custom Dialog object which emulates the default AlertDialog.Builder object well (so far as I can tell) and which (unlike an AlertDialog.Builder object) accepts the getWindow().setSoftInputMode(...) command. Bingo! It wasn't so difficult, I suppose, but it's an extraordinarily fiddly thing to have to do just to allow the automatic display of the soft keyboard. –  prepbgg Nov 6 '10 at 20:54

If you want to pop up dialog box along with soft key pad, so that user could free from tap on edit text inside dialog to show keypad, for example if you are going to take some value from dialog box, then use this simple code, it will solve your problem.

        public void onClick(final View v) 
        {   
             AlertDialog.Builder alert = new AlertDialog.Builder(v.getContext());                 
              alert.setIcon(R.drawable.smsicon);
              alert.setTitle(" Secrete Code");  
              alert.setMessage("Enter a Key for secrete text !");
              final EditText shft_val = new EditText(v.getContext()); 
              shft_val.setInputType(InputType.TYPE_CLASS_NUMBER);//changing the keyBoard to No only,restrict the string etc
              alert.setView(shft_val);

     //pOp Up the key pad on Edit Text  focus event

             shft_val.setOnFocusChangeListener(new OnFocusChangeListener()
             {
                public void onFocusChange(View arg0, boolean arg1)
                {  InputMethodManager inputMgr = (InputMethodManager)v.getContext().
                                    getSystemService(Context.INPUT_METHOD_SERVICE);
                    inputMgr.toggleSoftInput(InputMethodManager.SHOW_FORCED,InputMethodManager.HIDE_IMPLICIT_ONLY);
                        }
                    });

                 alert.setPositiveButton("Ok", new DialogInterface.OnClickListener() 
                 {  
                 public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int whichButton) 
                 {
                    //Your specific code... 
                 }
                 });
                 alert.setNegativeButton("Cancel", new DialogInterface.OnClickListener() {

                     public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int which) {                       
                         dialog.dismiss();
                         return;   
                     }
                 });
                       alert.show();
                    }
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Hi Prepbgg there is actually an alternative way to what you've done. I actually had to use mine within my ArrayAdapter. What i did was pass the context of the activity into the arrayadapter then call it to access getWindow() something like this:

NoteArrayAdapter(Activity _activity, int _layout, ArrayList<Note> _notes, Context _context) {
  callingNoteListObj = (NoteList) _context;
}

// withiin getView

callingNoteListObj.getWindow().setSoftInputMode(WindowManager.LayoutParams.SOFT_INPUT_STATE_ALWAYS_HIDDEN);

// within parent activity's onCreate()
thisObject = this;

//within my parent activity's fillData() (NoteList)
adapter =  new NoteArrayAdapter(activity, R.layout.channel_note_list_item, noteList, thisObject);
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I think you almost had it working in your original question. Try creating a final AlertDialog to call getWindow() on, e.g.

// Create the dialog used to modify the mailbox alias
final AlertDialog dialog = alert.create();

inputBox.setOnFocusChangeListener(new View.OnFocusChangeListener() {
    @Override
    public void onFocusChange(View v, boolean hasFocus) {
        if (hasFocus) {
            dialog.getWindow().setSoftInputMode( 
               WindowManager.LayoutParams.SOFT_INPUT_STATE_ALWAYS_VISIBLE);
        }
    }
});

I've tested this code and the keyboard now appears automatically on most of my devices, including: -Samsung Galaxy Tab OS 2.2 -Samsung Galaxy S OS 2.1 -HTC Sensation OS 2.3.4

Some other comments on this solution:

1) Check if you've got anything in your XML already to request the focus, as that may stop this code working (according to Ted in the question you link to).

2) This code doesn't seem to work on my HTC G2 running OS 2.3.4. I guess this is because it has a physical keyboard, and maybe the WindowManager.LayoutParams.SOFT_INPUT_STATE_ALWAYS_VISIBLE option doesn't work with it?

I also tried SOFT_INPUT_STATE_VISIBLE (without the ALWAYS), but that stopped the keyboard appearing automatically.

3) You may also want to add code so the user can press the Done button on the keyboard to submit the changes, e.g.

inputAlias.setOnKeyListener(new OnKeyListener()
{
  @Override
  public boolean onKey(View v, int keyCode, KeyEvent event)
  {
    if (keyCode == KeyEvent.KEYCODE_ENTER &&
        inputAlias.isFocused() &&
        inputAlias.getText().length() != 0)
    {
      // Save the new information here

  // Dismiss the dialog
      dialog.dismiss();
      return true;
    }
    return false;
  }
});
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In the following code snippet I show how to host an arbitrary LinearLayout in a DialogFragment. One using AlertDialog (where the soft keyboard doesn't work) and another way without using AlertDialog (where the soft keyboard does work!):

public static LinearLayout createLinearLayout(Context context)
{
    LinearLayout linearLayout = new LinearLayout(context);
    linearLayout.setOrientation(LinearLayout.VERTICAL);
    linearLayout.setLayoutParams(new FrameLayout.LayoutParams(ViewGroup.LayoutParams.MATCH_PARENT, ViewGroup.LayoutParams.WRAP_CONTENT));
    String html;
    html = "<form action=search method=get >\n";
    html += "Google Search: <input name=q value=\"Johnny Depp\" /><br/>\n";
    html += "<input type=submit name=output value=search /><br/>\n";
    html += "</form>\n";
    WebView webView = new WebView(context);
    webView.setLayoutParams(new ViewGroup.LayoutParams(LayoutParams.WRAP_CONTENT, LayoutParams.WRAP_CONTENT));
    webView.getSettings().setJavaScriptEnabled(true);
    webView.setWebChromeClient(new WebChromeClient());
    webView.setWebViewClient(new WebViewClient());
    webView.loadDataWithBaseURL("http://www.google.com", html, "text/html", "UTF-8", null);
    linearLayout.addView(webView);
    return linearLayout;
}

public void showWithAlertDialog()
{
    DialogFragment dialogFragment = new DialogFragment()
    {
        public Dialog onCreateDialog(Bundle savedInstanceState)
        {
            AlertDialog.Builder builder = new AlertDialog.Builder(getActivity());
            builder
                .setTitle("With AlertDialog")
                .setView(createLinearLayout(getActivity()));
            return builder.create();
        }
    };
    FragmentManager fragmentManager = getFragmentManager();
    FragmentTransaction fragmentTransaction = fragmentManager.beginTransaction();
    dialogFragment.show(fragmentTransaction, "dialog");
}

public void showWithoutAlertDialog()
{
    DialogFragment dialogFragment = new DialogFragment()
    {
        @Override
        public View onCreateView(LayoutInflater inflater, ViewGroup container, Bundle savedInstanceState)
        {
            getDialog().setTitle("Without AlertDialog");
            getDialog().setCanceledOnTouchOutside(false);
            return createLinearLayout(getActivity());
        }
    };
    FragmentManager fragmentManager = getFragmentManager();
    FragmentTransaction fragmentTransaction = fragmentManager.beginTransaction();
    dialogFragment.show(fragmentTransaction, "dialog");
}
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I know, this Question is really old, but since I've tried about 20 different so called 'solutions', I will post, what actually only worked for me finally.

This answer is based on the answer of Pir Fahim Shah, who pointed me in the right direction (Thanks):

Make sure, you put this in the onCreate of your activity, so that forced keyboards are being hidden, when dialog is closed:

this.getWindow().setSoftInputMode(WindowManager.LayoutParams.SOFT_INPUT_STATE_ALWAYS_HIDDEN);

then create a dialog like this:

    AlertDialog.Builder builder = new Builder(this);
    builder.setTitle("title");
    final EditText input = new EditText(this);
    input.setText("text");
    input.setSelection(input.getText().length()); // set cursor to end
    builder.setView(input);
    input.setOnFocusChangeListener(new OnFocusChangeListener()  {
       public void onFocusChange(View v, boolean hasFocus) { 
           if(hasFocus) {
               InputMethodManager inputMgr = (InputMethodManager)v.getContext().getSystemService(Context.INPUT_METHOD_SERVICE);
               inputMgr.toggleSoftInput(InputMethodManager.SHOW_FORCED,InputMethodManager.HIDE_IMPLICIT_ONLY);
           }
       }
    });
    builder.setPositiveButton("OK", new DialogInterface.OnClickListener() {
        public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int which) {
            // do something here
            dialog.dismiss();
        }
    });
    builder.setNegativeButton("Cancel", null);
    builder.show();
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