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I've seen my colleague do the second snippet quite often. Why is this? I've tried adding print statements to track the ctors and dtors, but both seem identical.

    std::vector<ClassTest> vecClass1;
    ClassTest ct1;
    ct1.blah = blah // set some stuff
    ...
    vecClass1.push_back(ct1);

    std::vector<ClassTest> vecClass2;
    vecClass2.push_back(ClassTest());
    ClassTest& ct2 = vecClass2.back();
    ct2.blah = blah // set some stuff
    ...

PS. I'm sorry if the title is misleading.

Edit:

Firstly, thank you all for your responses.

I've written a small application using std::move. The results are surprising to me perhaps because I've done something wrong ... would someone please explain why the "fast" path is performing significantly better.

#include <vector>
#include <string>
#include <boost/progress.hpp>
#include <iostream>

const std::size_t SIZE = 10*100*100*100;
//const std::size_t SIZE = 1;
const bool log = (SIZE == 1);

struct SomeType {
    std::string who;
    std::string bio;
    SomeType() {
        if (log) std::cout << "SomeType()" << std::endl;
    }
    SomeType(const SomeType& other) {
        if (log) std::cout << "SomeType(const SomeType&)" << std::endl; 
        //this->who.swap(other.who);
        //this->bio.swap(other.bio);
        this->who = other.who;
        this->bio = other.bio;
    }
    SomeType& operator=(SomeType& other) {
        if (log) std::cout << "SomeType::operator=()" << std::endl;
        this->who.swap(other.who);
        this->bio.swap(other.bio);
        return *this;
    }
    ~SomeType() {
        if (log) std::cout << "~SomeType()" << std::endl;
    }
    void swap(SomeType& other) {
        if (log) std::cout << "Swapping" << std::endl;
        this->who.swap(other.who);
        this->bio.swap(other.bio);
    }
        // move semantics
    SomeType(SomeType&& other) : 
          who(std::move(other.who))
        , bio(std::move(other.bio)) {
        if (log) std::cout << "SomeType(SomeType&&)" << std::endl;
    }
    SomeType& operator=(SomeType&& other) {
        if (log) std::cout << "SomeType::operator=(SomeType&&)" << std::endl;
        this->who = std::move(other.who);
        this->bio = std::move(other.bio);
        return *this;
    }
};

int main(int argc, char** argv) {

    {
        boost::progress_timer time_taken;
        std::vector<SomeType> store;
        std::cout << "Timing \"slow\" path" << std::endl;
        for (std::size_t i = 0; i < SIZE; ++i) {
            SomeType some;
            some.who = "bruce banner the hulk";
            some.bio = "you do not want to see me angry";
            //store.push_back(SomeType());
            //store.back().swap(some);
            store.push_back(std::move(some));
        }
    }
    {
        boost::progress_timer time_taken;
        std::vector<SomeType> store;
        std::cout << "Timing \"fast\" path" << std::endl;
        for (std::size_t i = 0; i < SIZE; ++i) {
            store.push_back(SomeType());
            SomeType& some = store.back();
            some.who = "bruce banner the hulk";
            some.bio = "you do not want to see me angry";
        }
    }
    return 0;
}

Output:

dev@ubuntu-10:~/Desktop/perf_test$ g++ -Wall -O3 push_back-test.cpp -std=c++0x
dev@ubuntu-10:~/Desktop/perf_test$ ./a.out 
Timing "slow" path
3.36 s

Timing "fast" path
3.08 s
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2  
Premature optimization, I guess. –  KennyTM Oct 29 '10 at 18:44
1  
Note that in C++, "classes and structs" is redundant, since classes and structs are the same thing. –  James McNellis Nov 1 '10 at 21:57
    
Regarding your edit. Things to check first -- does your implementation have an efficient move for std::string, and does your implementation have std::vector::push_back(T&&). If the answer to either is "no", then the std::move code is doing a copy (because your implementation's C++11 support is incomplete). –  Steve Jessop Jun 6 '12 at 11:17
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5 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If we accept that your colleague's snippet is wise, because ClassTest is expensive to copy, I would prefer:

using std::swap;

std::vector<ClassTest> vecClass1;
ClassTest ct1;
ct1.blah = blah // set some stuff
...
vecClass1.push_back(ClassTest());
swap(ct1, vecClass1.back());

I think it's clearer, and it may well be more exception-safe. The ... code presumably allocates resources and hence could throw an exception (or else what's making the fully-built ClassTest so expensive to copy?). So unless the vector really is local to the function, I don't think it's a good idea for it to be half-built while running that code.

Of course this is even more expensive if ClassTest only has the default swap implementation, but if ClassTest doesn't have an efficient swap, then it has no business being expensive to copy. So this trick perhaps should only be used with classes known to be friendly, rather than unknown template parameter types.

As Gene says, std::move is better anyway, if you have that C++0x feature.

If we're worried about ClassTest being expensive to copy, though, then relocating the vector is a terrifying prospect. So we should also either:

  • reserve enough space before adding anything,
  • use a deque instead of a vector.
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If the object is more expensive to copy after "set some stuff" than before, then the copy that happens when you insert the object into the vector will be less expensive if you insert the object before you "set some stuff" than after.

Really, though, since you should expect objects in a vector to be copied occasionally, this is probably not much of an optimization.

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Mmm... that might be, but if the object is expensive to copy, why save objects instead of pointers (or shared_ptrs, for that matter)? –  Diego Sevilla Oct 29 '10 at 18:46
    
@Diego: Some people do the craziest things in the name of "performance" (scare quotes important) –  James McNellis Oct 29 '10 at 18:47
    
haha. You're good! –  Diego Sevilla Oct 29 '10 at 18:47
2  
Personally, I'm a fan of doing all the initialization in the constructor, in which case you don't have this problem. You just pass the arguments to the constructor in the call to push_back. –  James McNellis Oct 29 '10 at 19:12
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The second version benefits from moving the temporary. The first version is copying the temporary vector. So the second one is potentially faster. The second version has also potentially smaller peak memory requirements, the first version creates two objects one temporary and one copy of it and only then deletes the temporary. You can improve the first version by explicitly moving the temporary:

std::vector<ClassTest> vecClass1;
ClassTest ct1;
ct1.blah = blah // set some stuff
...
vecClass1.push_back(std::move(ct1));
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You should probably ask your collegue to know exactly why, but we can still take a guess. As James pointed out, it might be a tad more efficient if the object is more expensive to copy once constructed.

I see advantages in both versions.

I like your collegue's snippet because: although there are 2 objects in both cases, they only co-exist for a very short period of time in the second version. There is only one object available for editing: this avoids the potential error of editing ct1 after push_back.

I like your personal snippet because: invoking push_back to add a second object potentially invalidates the reference ct2, inducing a risk of undefined behavior. The first snippet does not present this risk.

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They are identical (as far as I can see). Maybe he or she does that as an idiomatic custom.

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