Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Edit:

So this question was misinterpreted to such a ludicrous degree that it has no point anymore. I don't know how, since the question that I actually asked was whether my specific implementation of this—yes, known to be pointless, yes, not remotely resembling idiomatic C++—macro was as good as it could be, and whether it necessarily had to use auto, or if there was a suitable workaround instead. It was not supposed to generate this much attention, and certainly not a misunderstanding of this magnitude. It's pointless to ask respondents to edit their answers, I don't want anybody to lose reputation over this, and there's some good information floating around in here for potential future viewers, so I'm going to arbitrarily pick one of the lower-voted answers to evenly distribute the reputation involved. Move along, nothing to see here.


I saw this question and decided it might be fun to write a with statement in C++. The auto keyword makes this really easy, but is there a better way to do it, perhaps without using auto? I've elided certain bits of the code for brevity.

template<class T>
struct with_helper {

    with_helper(T& v) : value(v), alive(true) {}

    T* operator->() { return &value; }
    T& operator*() { return value; }

    T& value;
    bool alive;

};


template<class T> struct with_helper<const T> { ... };


template<class T> with_helper<T>       make_with_helper(T& value) { ... }
template<class T> with_helper<const T> make_with_helper(const T& value) { ... }


#define with(value) \
for (auto o = make_with_helper(value); o.alive; o.alive = false)

Here's an (updated) usage example with a more typical case that shows the use of with as it is found in other languages.

int main(int argc, char** argv) {

    Object object;

    with (object) {

        o->member = 0;
        o->method(1);
        o->method(2);
        o->method(3);

    }

    with (object.get_property("foo").perform_task(1, 2, 3).result()) {

        std::cout
            << (*o)[0] << '\n'
            << (*o)[1] << '\n'
            << (*o)[2] << '\n';

    }

    return 0;

}

I chose o because it's an uncommon identifier, and its form gives the impression of a "generic thing". If you've got an idea for a better identifier or a more usable syntax altogether, then please do suggest it.

share|improve this question
    
Thanks...Looks interesting and useful. –  Robert Harvey Oct 29 '10 at 18:57
    
@Robert Harvey: It's basically just shorthand for { [const] auto& o = ...; ... }, but slightly less ugly. –  Jon Purdy Oct 29 '10 at 19:00
    
Do you mean #define with(value) \ instead of #define with(value, id) \ ? BTW, how about Boost.Typeof? –  KennyTM Oct 29 '10 at 19:03
    
@KennyTM: Yeah, copying error from testing. Thanks for catching that for me. Boost.Typeof isn't ideal because it doesn't work out of the box with user-defined types, which is one of the most important uses of with. –  Jon Purdy Oct 29 '10 at 19:20
1  
@CiscolPPhone: Done and done. ;) –  Jon Purdy Oct 29 '10 at 19:46

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

?? attempted vb syntax into C++

with says do all the things in the following block by default referencing the object I've said to do it with right? Executes a series of statements making repeated reference to a single object or structure.

with(a)
 .do
 .domore
 .doitall

so how is the example giving you the same syntax?

to me examples of why to use a with where multiple de referencess

so rather than

book.sheet.table.col(a).row(2).setColour
book.sheet.table.col(a).row(2).setFont
book.sheet.table.col(a).row(2).setText
book.sheet.table.col(a).row(2).setBorder

you have

with( book.sheet.table.col(a).row(2) )
  .setColour
  .setFont
  .setText
  .setBorder

seems just as easy, and more common syntax in C++ to

cell& c = book.sheet.table.col(a).row(2);
c.setColour
c.setFont
c.setText
c.setBorder
share|improve this answer

If you use auto, why use macros at all?

int main()
{
    std::vector<int> vector_with_uncommonly_long_identifier;

    {
        auto& o = vector_with_uncommonly_long_identifier;

        o.push_back(1);
        o.push_back(2);
        o.push_back(3);
    }

    const std::vector<int> constant_duplicate_of_vector_with_uncommonly_long_identifier
        (vector_with_uncommonly_long_identifier);

    {
        const auto& o = constant_duplicate_of_vector_with_uncommonly_long_identifier;

        std::cout
            << o[0] << '\n'
            << o[1] << '\n'
            << o[2] << '\n';
    }

    {
        auto o = constant_duplicate_of_vector_with_uncommonly_long_identifier.size();
        std::cout << o <<'\n';
    }
}

EDIT: Without auto, just use typedef and references.

int main()
{
    typedef std::vector<int> Vec;

    Vec vector_with_uncommonly_long_identifier;

    {
        Vec& o = vector_with_uncommonly_long_identifier;

        o.push_back(1);
        o.push_back(2);
        o.push_back(3);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
I already thought of this. I already mentioned it. It's not really what I was asking. –  Jon Purdy Oct 29 '10 at 20:41

For C++0x (which you're assuming):

int main() {

    std::vector<int> vector_with_uncommonly_long_identifier;

    {
        auto& o = vector_with_uncommonly_long_identifier;

        o.push_back(1);
        o.push_back(2);
        o.push_back(3);

    }
}

Cheers & hth.,

share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks, but I wasn't actually assuming C++0x. Maybe that's not clear. –  Jon Purdy Oct 29 '10 at 20:40
    
@Jon: auto as automatic type inference is C++0x. Cheers, –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Oct 30 '10 at 4:59
    
@Alf P. Steinbach: I was looking for a non-auto solution, hence, specifically non-C++0x. But I gave up. –  Jon Purdy Oct 30 '10 at 6:03
    
@Jon: just do std::vector<int>& instead of auto&. Or if the type specification itself is long, then also add a typedef for the type. Cheers & hth., –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Oct 30 '10 at 6:06
1  
@Alf: You...continue to miss my point. Don't worry about it. –  Jon Purdy Oct 30 '10 at 6:06

Why not just use a good lambda?

auto func = [&](std::vector<int>& o) {
};
func(vector_with_a_truly_ridiculously_long_identifier);

The simple fact is that if your identifiers are so long, that you can't type them out every time, use a reference, function, pointer, etc to solve this problem, or better, refactor the name. Statements like this (e.g. using() in C#) have additional side effects (deterministic cleanup, in my example). Your statement in C++ has no notable actual benefits, since it doesn't actually invoke any additional behaviour against just writing the code out.

share|improve this answer
    
The problem with this approach is that it makes the code harder to read -- you have to jump downwards to the bottom of the lambda definition to find the object being acted on, then jump back up to figure out what the code is doing to that object, instead of just reading the code in order. –  Adam Rosenfield Oct 29 '10 at 21:20
1  
@Adam Rosenfield: It also has the advantage that func could be dynamically passed around through the use of std::function. Moreover, the OP's entire not-really-a-problem is ridiculous. Are you expecting a non-ridiculous solution? –  Puppy Oct 29 '10 at 22:00
    
@Adam Rosenfield, @DeadMG: Jeez, I just get the bug to know if the obviously, deliberately useless macro I wrote was written as well as it could've been, and a slew of irrelevant answers ensue. I don't want to delete the question, but there's no point to it anymore. –  Jon Purdy Oct 30 '10 at 1:46

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.