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Ok, this should be easy...

I'm new to groovy and I'm looking to implement the following logic:

def testFiles = findAllTestFiles();

So far, I've come up with the code below which successfully prints all files names. However, instead of printing, I just need to put them into a collection. Of course, I could do this the old java way: just instantiate a collection, add all the elements and return it. However, that wouldn't teach me anything.

So how do you do this the cool, "Groovy" way?

static File[] findAllTestFiles() {
    def directory = new File("src/test/java");
    def closure = {File f -> if(f.name =~ /Test\.java$/) println f }
    directory.eachFileRecurse FileType.FILES, closure
    return null;
}

I'm looking to implement findAlltestFiles() in Groovy using as little code as possible while still being readable.

share|improve this question
up vote 9 down vote accepted

I'd try to avoid building the collection entirely. Using closures, you can separate the logic to select the files from what you actually want to do with them, like so:

import groovy.io.FileType

def withEachTestFile(Closure closure) {
    new File("src/test/java").eachFileRecurse(FileType.FILES) {
        if (it.name =~ /Test\.java$/) {
            closure.call(it)
        }
    }
}

Then if you want to do something on the test files, you can do it directly without building up a list in memory:

withEachTestFile() { println it }

or if you really want the list, you can easily generate it, using whatever collection makes sense:

def files = []
withEachTestFile() { files << it }
share|improve this answer
    
I feel that I really need the list of files but I'm probably wrong (since this is my first Groovy class, ever). I will consider your first suggestion more thoroughly--it seems like a great insight. I'm going to have to play with it to fully understand what you're saying and how to apply it--this is a completely different way of thinking of things! I like it... groovy is growing on me, fast. – gmale Oct 30 '10 at 2:45
    
I've re-written my entire script, trying to design with closures in mind. At times, it still hurts my head a little to think about it, deeply. But I'm sold on Groovy so I'll get a few books and start mastering this new approach. I'm excited to learn how to use Groovy Console... thanks for your help. – gmale Nov 3 '10 at 3:02

A newer, standard and more generic way to traverse a directory which supports multiple closure callbacks is traverse.

import static groovy.io.FileType.FILES
...
def files = [] 
new File("src/test/java").traverse(type: FILES, nameFilter: ~/Test\.java$/) {
    files << it    
}
share|improve this answer

something like this should work

def files = []
new File("src/test/java").eachFileRecurse(FILES) {
    if(it.name =~ /Test\.java$/)) {
        println f
        files << f
    }
}

or i think modifying your code like this

static File[] findAllTestFiles() {
    def files = []
    def directory = new File("src/test/java");
    def closure = {File f -> if(f.name =~ /Test\.java$/) {println f; files << f} }
    directory.eachFileRecurse FileType.FILES, closure
    return files;
}
share|improve this answer
    
thanks! your answer was to the point and very helpful. I wish I could also award you points for the correct answer! Thanks for taking the time to help. – gmale Nov 3 '10 at 3:04

The following is untested, but the findAll method should help make your code very concise:

List<File> files = new File("src/test/java").listFiles().findAll { it.name =~ /Test\.java$/ }
share|improve this answer

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