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Can background image extend beyond div's borders? Does overflow: visible apply to this?

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1  
off the top of my head: No and No. – drudge Oct 29 '10 at 22:44
up vote 20 down vote accepted

No, a background can't go beyond the edge of an element.

The overflow style controls how the element reacts when the content is larger than the specified size of the element.

However, a floating element inside the div can extent outside the div, and that element could have a background. The usefulness of that is limited, though, as IE7 and earlier has a bug that causes the div to grow instead of letting the floating element show outside it.

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Interesting- thanks – Yarin Oct 30 '10 at 15:59
    
See my answer for a solution – Yarin Oct 30 '10 at 18:37

Following up on kijin's advice, I'd like to share my solution for image offsets:

/* 
Only effective cross-browser method to offset image out of bounds of container AFAIK, 
is to set as background image on div and apply matching margin/padding offsets:
*/
#logo {
    margin:-50px auto 0 auto;
    padding:50px 0 0 0;
    width:200px;
    height:200px;
    background:url(../images/logo.png) no-repeat;
}

I used this example on a simple div element <div id="logo"></div> to position my logo with a -50px vertical offset. (Note that the combined margin/padding settings ensure you don't run into collapsing margin issues.)

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1  
The padding should be positive, not negative. A negative padding is invalid, so the style will be ignored. – Guffa Oct 30 '10 at 18:59
    
@Guffa- Fixed it- thanks – Yarin Nov 4 '10 at 19:53
    
This works well (tested with IE7, IE8, IE9, Firefox, Safari, Chrome), thank you! – nachomaans Jan 17 '12 at 14:07
    
I tend to notice subtle browser/device/OS inconsistencies with both negative padding and margin, so I've started to avoid it. It works in some cases and I usually see an issue when I'm, for example, trying to inline position list items of an unordered list. – user396070 Nov 4 '13 at 3:48

No, the background won't extend beyond the borders. But you can stretch the border as far as you want using padding and some clever tweaking of negative margins & position.

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Good point @kijin, I'll have to consider that – Yarin Oct 30 '10 at 16:00
    
worked great- see my answer for more – Yarin Oct 30 '10 at 18:38

not possible to set a background image 'outside' it's element,

BUT YOU CAN DO what you want with using 'PSEUDO' element and make that whatever size you want and position it wherever you want. see here : i have set the arrow outside the span enter image description here

here is the code

HTML :

<div class="tooltip">
<input class="cf_inputbox required" maxlength="150" size="30" title id="text_13" name="name" type="text"><span class="msg">dasdasda</span>
</div>

strong text

 .tooltip{position:relative; float:left;}
    .tooltip .msg {font-size:12px;
        background-color:#fff9ea;
        border:2px #e1ca82 solid;
        border-radius:5px;
        background-position:left;
        position:absolute;
        padding:4px 5px 4px 10px;
        top:0%; left:104%;
        z-index:9000; position:absolute; max-width:250px;clear:both;
    min-width:150px;}


    .tooltip .msg:before {
        background:url(tool_tip.png);
        background-repeat:no-repeat;
    content: " ";
        display: block;
        height: 20px;
        position: absolute;
        left:-10px; top:1px;
        width: 20px;
        z-index: -1;
        }

see here example: http://jsfiddle.net/568Zy/11/

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After a little bit of research: No and No :)

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Thanks- gave the answer to Guffa cuz he gave some more detail – Yarin Oct 30 '10 at 16:00

I tried using negative values for background-position but it didn't work (in firefox at least). There's not really any reason for it to. Just set the background image on one of the elements higher up in the hierarchy.

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1  
Negative background position values is used for sprite images, so that actually relies on the background not displaying outside the element. :) – Guffa Oct 30 '10 at 0:01

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