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I have a wrapper function that returns a function. Is there a way to programmatically set the docstring of the returned function? If I could write to __doc__ I'd do the following:

def wrapper(a):
    def add_something(b):
       return a + b
    add_something.__doc__ = 'Adds ' + str(a) + ' to `b`'
    return add_something

Then I could do

>>> add_three = wrapper(3)
>>> add_three.__doc__
'Adds 3 to `b`

However, since __doc__ is read-only, I can't do that. What's the correct way?


Edit: Ok, I wanted to keep this simple, but of course this is not what I'm actually trying to do. Even though in general __doc__ is writeable in my case it isn't.

I am trying to create testcases for unittest automatically. I have a wrapper function that creates a class object that is a subclass of unittest.TestCase:

import unittest
def makeTestCase(filename, my_func):
    class ATest(unittest.TestCase):
        def testSomething(self):
            # Running test in here with data in filename and function my_func
            data  = loadmat(filename)
            result = my_func(data)
            self.assertTrue(result > 0)

    return ATest

If I create this class and try to set the docstring of testSomething I get an error:

>>> def my_func(): pass
>>> MyTest = makeTestCase('some_filename', my_func)
>>> MyTest.testSomething.__doc__ = 'This should be my docstring'
AttributeError: attribute '__doc__' of 'instancemethod' objects is not writable
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1  
Why don't you just write a docstring? –  Rafe Kettler Oct 30 '10 at 3:02
    
@RaeKettler: Because then if you update it, you have to always remember to manually update all the other copies in all the other wrapper functions –  endolith Jul 11 '12 at 16:11
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6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I would pass the docstring into the factory function and use type to manually construct the class.

def make_testcase(filename, myfunc, docstring):
    def test_something(self):
        data = loadmat(filename)
        result = myfunc(data)
        self.assertTrue(result > 0)

    clsdict = {'test_something': test_something,
               '__doc__': docstring}
    return type('ATest', (unittest.TestCase,), clsdict)

MyTest = makeTestCase('some_filename', my_func, 'This is a docstring')
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An instancemethod gets its docstring from its __func__. Change the docstring of __func__ instead. (The __doc__ attribute of functions are are writeable.)

>>> class Foo(object):
...     def bar(self):
...         pass
...
>>> Foo.bar.__func__.__doc__ = "A super docstring"
>>> help(Foo.bar)
Help on method bar in module __main__:

bar(self) unbound __main__.Foo method
    A super docstring

>>> foo = Foo()
>>> help(foo.bar)
Help on method bar in module __main__:

bar(self) method of __main__.Foo instance
    A super docstring

From the 2.7 docs:

User-defined methods

A user-defined method object combines a class, a class instance (or None) and any callable object (normally a user-defined function).

Special read-only attributes: im_self is the class instance object, im_func is the function object; im_class is the class of im_self for bound methods or the class that asked for the method for unbound methods; __doc__ is the method’s documentation (same as im_func.__doc__); __name__ is the method name (same as im_func.__name__); __module__ is the name of the module the method was defined in, or None if unavailable.

Changed in version 2.2: im_self used to refer to the class that defined the method.

Changed in version 2.6: For 3.0 forward-compatibility, im_func is also available as __func__, and im_self as __self__.

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__doc__ isn't read-only.

>>> def foo():
...   return 42
... 
>>> foo.__doc__ = 'bar'
>>> help(foo)
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AttributeError: attribute 'doc' of 'instancemethod' objects is not writable –  hwiechers Jan 29 '11 at 6:35
    
@hwiechers: "Is there a way to programmatically set the docstring of [a] function?" –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Jan 29 '11 at 6:36
    
Looks like the question was changed after your answer. He's trying to set the docstring of an instancemethod not a function. –  hwiechers Jan 29 '11 at 6:43
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__doc__ is not writable only when your object is of type 'type'.

In your case, add_three is a function and you can just set __doc__ to any string.

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Just use decorators. Here's your case:

def add_doc(value):
    def _doc(func):
        func.__doc__ = value
        return func
    return _doc

import unittest
def makeTestCase(filename, my_func):
    class ATest(unittest.TestCase):
        @add_doc('This should be my docstring')
        def testSomething(self):
            # Running test in here with data in filename and function my_func
            data  = loadmat(filename)
            result = my_func(data)
            self.assertTrue(result > 0)

    return ATest

def my_func(): pass

MyTest = makeTestCase('some_filename', my_func)
print MyTest.testSomething.__doc__
> 'This should be my docstring'

Here's a similar use case: Python dynamic help and autocomplete generation

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In the case where you're trying to automatically generate unittest.TestCase subclasses, you may have more mileage overriding their shortDescription method.

This is the method that strips the underlying docstring down to the first line, as seen in normal unittest output; overriding it was enough to give us control over what showed up in reporting tools like TeamCity, which was what we needed.

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