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Check the following code:

string toLowerCase(const string& str) {
    string res(str);
    int i;

    for (i = 0; i < (int) res.size(); i++)
        res[i] = (char) tolower(res[i]);

    return res;
}

class LeagueComparator
{
public:
    bool operator()(const string& s1, const string& s2)
    {
        return toLowerCase(s1) < toLowerCase(s2);
    }
};

int main()
{
    set<string, LeagueComparator> leagues;
    set<string, LeagueComparator>::iterator iter;

    leagues.insert("BLeague");
    leagues.insert("aLeague");    // leagues = {"aLeague", "BLeague"}
    leagues.insert("ALeague");

    for (iter = leagues.begin(); iter != leagues.end(); iter++)
        cout << *iter << endl;

    return 0;
}

The output is:

aLeague
BLeague

which is shocking to me. I thought (and expecting) the output would be:

aLeague
ALeague
BLeague

Before the execution of leagues.insert("ALeague");, the leagues contains "aLeague" and "BLeague". My question is, while executing leagues.insert("ALeague"); why the machine treats "ALeague" == "aleague"? According to my understanding, there is no element "ALeague" in leagues. So "ALeague" should be inserted into leagues. The comparator should determine where to put "ALeague".

Thanks in advance.

PS: Please don't hit me for using C style cast. :P I'm too lazy to type static_cast.

share|improve this question
    
The fact that it feels you have to work to perform a C++ style cast is one of the main reason C++ style casts exist -- namely that you should avoid any sort of casting in C++. In this case you should remove the casts completely, and use the correct types instead. I.e. instead of (int) res.size(), remove the cast and change i's type to be unsigned. –  Billy ONeal Oct 30 '10 at 6:06
    
Also, i should be declared in the loop, not outside of the loop. And in C++, toLowerCase should probably just call std::transform(str.begin(), str.end(), str.begin(), std::ptr_fun(tolower)) instead of writing an explicit loop. –  Billy ONeal Oct 30 '10 at 6:11
    
@Billy ONeal: thanks. i need to be used to use transform(). that toLowerCase was written by me many years ago. i think i didn't know about transform at that time. i'll update my codebase. –  Donotalo Oct 30 '10 at 17:30

4 Answers 4

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Your comparator, thanks to the toLowerCase, says that "aLeague" == "ALeague". Since (according to your comparator) "aLeague" < "ALeague" == false and "ALeague" < "aLeague" == false, they must be equivalent. And inserting an equivalent element into a set doesn't do anything.

share|improve this answer
3  
+1. Note that the comparator is not establishing equality, it is establishing equivalence. There is a difference w.r.t. standard and STL documentation. –  Billy ONeal Oct 30 '10 at 6:10
    
Thanks, editing my post. –  John Calsbeek Oct 30 '10 at 6:25

When you insert any value to a set, the object checks to see whether it already contains that value. Your LeagueComparator object compares ALeague with the other two values already in the set. It determines that the existing value aLeague is neither greater than nor less than the proposed new entry (ALeague), so they must be equal, and so it doesn't proceed with the insert. The set remains with just two elements. That's the whole point of providing a customer comparison object, so you can control how the set determines whether two elements match.

share|improve this answer
    
+1. Note that to be consistent with STL docs, most uses of "equal" here should be replaced with "equivalent". Less-than comparators cannot establish equality. –  Billy ONeal Oct 30 '10 at 6:09

Given the comparator you provided, "ALeague" is indeed equivalent "aLeague".

Given two values, x and y, and a less-than comparator z:

  • If z(x, y) is true, then x is less than y
  • If z(y, x) is true, then y is less than x
  • If neither is true, then x is equivalent to y
  • If both are true, then you have a broken comparator.
share|improve this answer
    
+1, but slight problem with the third bullet w.r.t. STL docs. There is a distinction between equality and equivalence. A less-than comparator cannot establish equality, only equivalence. –  Billy ONeal Oct 30 '10 at 6:09
    
@Billy ONeal: according to STL doc (i don't have it), what are the definitions of equality and equivalence? –  Donotalo Oct 30 '10 at 17:34
    
@Donotalo: Equality is comparison using an equality comparer, or operator==. Equivalence is the state where a less than comparer or operator< returns false for either ordering of the arguments, as specified here. Conceptually, it's the difference between equality comparable and less than comparable. –  Billy ONeal Oct 30 '10 at 17:50
    
See Effective STL Item #19: Understand the difference between equality and equivalence, for more details. –  Billy ONeal Oct 30 '10 at 17:56

Replace your LeagueComparator with

class LeagueComparator
{
public:
    bool operator()(const string& s1, const string& s2)
    {
        return toLowerCase(s1) < toLowerCase(s2)   ||  
               !(toLowerCase(s2) < toLowerCase(s1))  &&  s1 < s2;
    }
};
share|improve this answer
    
That's equivalent to specifying no comparer at all. Your comparator simply returns s1 < s2 in all cases. (Because s1 < s2 implies toLowerCase(s1) < toLowerCase(s2)) -1 –  Billy ONeal Oct 30 '10 at 17:54
    
It's not true. s1="b", s2="A". My comparator returns false because of false || !true && true = false. s1 < s2 returns true. –  Alexey Malistov Oct 31 '10 at 15:59

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