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I'm trying to do a Project Euler question.

I'm looking for the sum of all prime numbers under 2,000,000.

This is what I have...

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {


    unsigned long int sum = 0;

    for (unsigned long int i = 0; i < 2000000; i++) {


        if (isPrime(i)) {
            sum += i;
        }
    }

    printf("sum => %lu\n", sum);


}

int isPrime(int num) {

    if (num < 2) {
        return 0;
    }

    for (int i = 2; i < num; ++i) {
        if (num % i == 0) {
            return 0;
        }
    }
    return 1;
}

It takes ages to run, therefore it does not satisfy the one minute rule of run time for Euler problems.

When I run it with the limit of 10, it gets the correct answer, 17 like in the question.

My guess is there is some algorithm that can reduce the work being done. Problem is, I don't know what it is.

Can someone please point me in the right direction?

Thanks.

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6  
possible duplicate of Most elegant way to generate prime numbers –  Billy ONeal Oct 30 '10 at 6:25
    
This isn't really C language specific -- it has more to do with prime number generation in general. –  Billy ONeal Oct 30 '10 at 6:26
    
@Billy ONeal Thanks, I'll check out that question. –  alex Oct 30 '10 at 6:28
1  
From Billy ONeal's link, Eratosthenes' sieve seems especially appropriate when you know in advance you need all primes less than 2 millions (as opposed to "the first n primes"). –  Pascal Cuoq Oct 30 '10 at 6:33
1  
This method is called Trial Division, and it generally can be used for prime checks of relatively small integers. Few optimizations: (1) If you are not limited with memory, you may store all discovered primes, and then find divisors only among primes, not among all ints. (2) All prime numbers greater than 3 can be written either as (6*k + 1), or as (6*k - 1) - so you may significantly reduce number of cycles in main function. –  Kel Oct 30 '10 at 6:47

7 Answers 7

up vote 7 down vote accepted

With i from 2 to 2000000 (or whatever upper limit), once you determine that i is prime, you then know that {2i, 3i, 4i, ..., ni} are not prime numbers, where ni <= 2000000.

You don't need to test those numbers — you know they aren't prime.

As you progress through your array of testNumbers and eliminate numbers from this list, numbers that you now know are not prime, you significantly reduce the numbers you actually need to test.

Yes, this is the Sieve of Eratosthenes.

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6  
This algorithm is called the Sieve of Eratosthenes. –  Billy ONeal Oct 30 '10 at 6:32
1  
even sieve of eratosthenes takes forever to complete it's run for 2 million primes –  Vineet Menon Jun 1 '12 at 5:06

you can short the time you look for prime number. there is million ways to do it. I think you don't need to test until num, but only to sqrt(num) but this will only help you a little (on the actual prime numbers)

There are statistical methods to check if a prime number is actually prime which are faster and can only be mistaken once in 2^alot....

The fastest way to find a prime number was found by a researcher from India, but I can't find the link.

you can also look here:

Wiki

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That solution is still exponential. Much better solutions exist, for example in the duplicate to which I linked. –  Billy ONeal Oct 30 '10 at 6:30
    
You are right, and there are a lot other ways to do it (like alex suggested). I played with it once... but never got to changing the complexity of the search, just made it a little better.... –  Dani Oct 30 '10 at 6:35
1  
You are talking about the AKS Primality Test. –  st0le Oct 30 '10 at 18:13
    
Yes, Indeed. thanks. –  Dani Oct 31 '10 at 5:14
2  
AKS is extremely slow for all reasonable numbers. For extremely large numbers, it's similar in run time to ECPP (but generally slower). Just because it was the first primality-proving algorithm to be proven to run in polynomial time doesn't mean it's a reasonable choice! –  Charles Nov 1 '10 at 21:29

You can speed up your isPrime(int num) function by passing the array of primes discovered so far and check if num is a multiple of these primes. Also you don't need to loop up to num, only sqrt(num).

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Use sieve of Atkin, its an optimized version of sieve of Eratosthenes link.

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sieve_of_Sundaram

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Sieve of Atkin is more efficient than Sundaram's. But Sieve of Sundaram is an enhancement over Eratosthenes –  srean Oct 30 '10 at 7:15
    
true but it is easier to implement, and since this is a one time test.... The sum will not differ in any other run, so the time spend to implement the code might not worth it –  frag Oct 30 '10 at 12:54
    
Actually, the Sieve of Sundaram doesn't run as quickly as a well-optimized Sieve of Eratosthenes, not even in theory. Look up the best runtimes for both and compare for yourself! –  Charles Nov 1 '10 at 21:30

Hint: Use BitArray and seive method.

See the code if you cannot figure it out.The code is in Java but wouldn't be difficult to translate to C.

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#include <windows.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

struct prime_list_t {
    long                n;
    struct prime_list_t *next;
};

void add_prime_list_t(struct prime_list_t** list, long n);
void free_prime_list_t(struct prime_list_t** list);
long count_prime_list_t(struct prime_list_t* list);
long last_prime_list_t(struct prime_list_t* list);

/* if one of the primes in list divides n, is not a prime */
int is_prime(struct prime_list_t* pl, long n) {
    struct prime_list_t* p;

    if(pl == NULL) {
        abort();
    }
    p = pl;
    while(p != NULL) {
        if(n % p->n == 0) {
            return 1;
        }
        p = p->next;
    }
    return 0;
}

int main() {
    struct prime_list_t* pl = NULL;
    struct prime_list_t* p;
    long n_up = 2000000;
    long long p_sum = 0;
    long ppr;
    int done;

    /* add first prime number */
    add_prime_list_t(&pl, 2);

    /* from now on add to this list up to the number of items */
    done = 0;
    do {
        /* get the last prime plus one */
        ppr = last_prime_list_t(pl) + 1;
        while(is_prime(pl, ppr) != 0) {
            ppr++;
            if(ppr >= n_up) {
                /* hit the upper limit */
                done = 1;
                break;
            }
        }
        if(done) {
            break;
        }

        /* ppr is prime */
        add_prime_list_t(&pl, ppr);

        /* display status */
        printf("%ld numbers largest prime %ld\r", count_prime_list_t(pl), last_prime_list_t(pl));
    } while(!done);

    p = pl;
    p_sum = 0;
    while(p) {
        // printf("%d ", p->n);
        p_sum += p->n;
        p = p->next;
    }
    printf("\nsum: %I64d\n", p_sum);


    free_prime_list_t(&pl);
    return 0;
}

void add_prime_list_t(struct prime_list_t** list, long n) {
    struct prime_list_t* node;

    if(list == NULL) {
        abort();
    }

    node = (struct prime_list_t*)malloc(sizeof(struct prime_list_t));
    if(node == NULL) {
        abort();
    }

    node->n = n;
    node->next = NULL;

    if(*list == NULL) {
        *list = node;
    }
    else {
        struct prime_list_t* p;

        p = *list;
        while(p->next != NULL) {
            p = p->next;
        }
        p->next = node;
    }
}

void free_prime_list_t(struct prime_list_t** list) {
    struct prime_list_t* node;

    if(list == NULL) {
        return;
    }
    node = *list;
    while(node != NULL) {
        struct prime_list_t* p;

        p = node;
        node = node->next;
        free(p);
    }
    *list = NULL;
}

long count_prime_list_t(struct prime_list_t* list) {
    long c;
    struct prime_list_t* p;

    for(p = list, c = 0; p != NULL; p = p->next, c++)
        ;
    return c;
}

long last_prime_list_t(struct prime_list_t* list) {
    long n;
    struct prime_list_t* p;

    n = 0;
    p = list;
    while(p->next != NULL) {
        p = p->next;
    }
    return p->n;
}

And this would be the output:

$kpwr
148933 numbers largest prime 1999993
sum: 142913828922

$
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