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Why can't just avoid this if I want all objects in my app to be serializable ?

Update: I know that some class cannot be serialized like thread but the java system KNOWS also that Thread is not serializable, why doesn't it manage this automatically ?

I'd like to know if there are some fundamental reasons.

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I've edited out a reaction to someone's less helpful answer. Remember, some programmers have big egos, so ignore them. Its best to downvote or flag as offensive and move on. –  Juliet Nov 1 '10 at 14:13

4 Answers 4

Why can't just avoid this if I want all objects in my app to be serializable ?

Simply, because that's the way Java serialization works.

Consider that it does not make sense to serialize all objects.

  • Thread instances and instances of most Stream classes include critical state that simply cannot be serialized.
  • Some classes depend on class statics, and they are not serialized.
  • Some classes are non serializable because they critically depend on unserializable classes.
  • Some classes you simply don't want or need to serialize.

So given that, how should the application programmer control what gets serialized? How does he stop all sorts of unnecessary stuff from being serialized by accident? Answer: by declaring the classes he wants to be serializable as implementing Serializable.

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Yes but the java system KNOWS that Thread is not serializable, why doesn't it manage this automatically ? –  user310291 Oct 30 '10 at 11:46
    
How would I serialize by accident since I have to apply a method write to the object I want to serialize ? I mean I have to do the jobs twice this doesn't adhere to the KISS principle ? –  user310291 Oct 30 '10 at 11:47
    
1) Actually, it doesn't. Or more precisely, it only knows this because Thread does not implement Serializable. 2) If you forget that object A may contain a reference to object B under some circumstances. –  Stephen C Oct 30 '10 at 11:48
    
It doesn't just because SUN was to lazy to make it know itself :) Why doesn't SUN integrate this knowledge "KNOW THUSELF" is what makes a system intelligent. –  user310291 Oct 30 '10 at 11:49
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IMO, if there's any laziness ... it is you not wanting to tag your classes as serializable :-). Besides, I find it hard to imagine a Java application where all application classes should be serializable. –  Stephen C Oct 30 '10 at 11:54

What Is The Use Of A Marker Interface Even It Doesn't Have Methods...

http://www.blurtit.com/q250664.html

Discover the secrets of the Java Serialization API

http://java.sun.com/developer/technicalArticles/Programming/serialization/

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If you implement all your serialization-related code yourself, you don't need it, but as long as you do it using standard library functions, there must be some way to communicate that your classes are designed and ready for serialization. Just because all the classes in your program are serializable doesn't mean they are in other's programs.

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Because that's the way the language was designed? Questions like this are fundamentally pointless. It would have been possible, and indeed easier, to make all classes serializable, but it wasn't done that way. There are lots of reasons why not, and they are given in some FAQ or Gosling interview somewhere, that I read about 12 years ago. Security was certainly one of them. But at this stage it's a futile discussion really.

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and answer like this is also pointless. The language may have been designed this way just because the team didn't have time to integrate in this version or for a fundamental reason. –  user310291 Oct 31 '10 at 10:48
    
It seems that other persons want to know so don't take your opinion for granted. –  user310291 Oct 31 '10 at 10:53
    
But it wasn't done for lack of time. That's just your opinion. And why would it take more time to do less work? It was a deliberate design decision and it is documented. Somewhere. But that being so, that's just the way it is. Not just 'my opinion'. –  EJP Nov 1 '10 at 0:45
    
And how do YOU know ? Crystal ball :) –  user310291 Nov 7 '10 at 20:44
    
Not at all. I read an interview with Gosling about 12 years ago that said so. –  EJP Nov 8 '10 at 2:34

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