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['Chrome', 'Chromium', 'Google', 'Python']


{'C': ['Chrome', 'Chromium'], 'G': ['Google'], 'P': ['Python']}

I can make it work like this.

alphabet = dict()
for name in ['Chrome', 'Chromium', 'Google', 'Python']:
  character = name[:1].upper()
  if not character in alphabet:
    alphabet[character] = list()

It is probably a bit faster to pre-populate the dictionary with A-Z, to save the key check on every name, and then afterwards delete keys with empty lists. I'm not sure either is the best solution though.

Is there a pythonic way to do this?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Anything wrong with this? I agree with Antoine, the oneliner solution is rather cryptic.

import collections

alphabet = collections.defaultdict(list)
for word in words:
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This is a lot better imo – Antoine Pelisse Oct 30 '10 at 14:08
It's the first thing that came to my mind. – aaronasterling Oct 30 '10 at 14:15

I don't know if it's Pythonic, but it's more succinct:

import itertools
def keyfunc(x):
   return x[:1].upper()
l = ['Chrome', 'Chromium', 'Google', 'Python']
dict((key, list(value)) for (key,value) in itertools.groupby(l, keyfunc))

EDIT 2 made it less succinct than previous version, more readable and more correct (groupby works as intended only on sorted lists)

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and it's elligible for obfuscated code contest – Antoine Pelisse Oct 30 '10 at 13:59
@Antoine: I hope not. The groupby makes the intention pretty clear. – Amnon Oct 30 '10 at 14:02
In making it correct, you also made it way less efficient. I would pretty much can groupby and roll with a one pass solution at this point. – aaronasterling Oct 30 '10 at 18:17

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