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What's the difference between container and wrapper? And what is meant by each?

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up vote 9 down vote accepted

There is no difference between them.

It's just what you like to call the <div> that, often, contains all content of a page

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I guess you mean 'contains', not 'centers', right? – allesklar Oct 30 '10 at 16:18
    
@allesklar: Yep, that's better. Anyway, one of its functions is often to center all content – Harmen Oct 30 '10 at 16:20

According to this answer:

In programming languages the word container is generally used for structures that can contain more than one element.

A wrapper instead is something that wraps around a single object to provide more functionalities and interfaces to it.

This definition matches with meaning of the words and it's useful for html structures like:

<div class="items-container">
    <div class="item-wrapper">
        <div class="item">...</div>
    </div>
    <div class="item-wrapper">
        <div class="item">...</div>
    </div>
    <div class="item-wrapper">
        <div class="item">...</div>
    </div>
    <div class="item-wrapper">
        <div class="item">...</div>
    </div>
    <div class="item-wrapper">
        <div class="item">...</div>
    </div>
</div>
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I like this way of thinking. – Karl Morrison Jan 21 at 15:11

There can be a difference, if you choose to give'em one. Actually it makes sense to have two names for a container/wrapper, as they have different functions:

1) the standard wrap we think of has a width of let's say 960px or 60em and centers its content on the screen (margin:auto)

2) there's another wrap - the one that is in some cases necessary to implement a sticky footer. imo the sticky footer with the best browser support (no js and at least quite clean) is this one: http://ryanfait.com/sticky-footer/

apropos sticky: sticking to existing naming conventions, I like the one of apppie, which clearly distinguishes between wrap 1 (called container) and wrap 2 (called wrapper). see: http://www.apppie.org/pages/approach/naming.html

there might be other conventions. as said, that you distinguish makes sense - how is up to you.

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