Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Am I doing something wrong (again)?

#include <iostream>
using std::cout;

struct Map
{
    Map()
    {
        cout << "Map()\n";
    }
    Map(const Map& pattern)
    {
        cout << "Map(const Map& pattern)\n";
    }
    Map(Map&& tmp)
    {
        cout << "Map(Map&& tmp)\n";
    }
};

Map createMap()
{
    return Map();
}

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    //dflt
    Map m;
    //cpy
    Map m1(m);
    //move
    Map m2(Map(m1));//<<I thought that I create here tmp unnamed obj.
    Map m3(createMap());//<<---or at least here, but nope...
    return 0;
}

Please see the commented line in the code

Edited [taken from FredOverflow answer]

int main() 
{ 
    std::cout << "default\n"; 
    Map m; 

    std::cout << "\ncopy\n"; 
    Map m1(m); 

    std::cout << "\nmove\n";
    Map m2((Map(m1))); 

    std::cout << "\nmove\n"; 
    Map m3(createMap()); 
}  

I'm getting output:

default
Map()

copy
Map(const Map& pattern)

move
Map(const Map& pattern)//Here why not move ctor aswell as copy?

move
Map()
Map()
Map(Map&& tmp)
share|improve this question
2  
Please take the time to format your code correctly. (By correctly, I mean consistently) If you're asking others to spend time to decipher the code for you, you shouldn't make us fight indent styles too. I've fixed the formatting and replaced the msvc specific bits with standard equivelents. –  Billy ONeal Oct 30 '10 at 15:26
    
@Roger hey it is not a duplicate. Here I'm asking why move ctor isn't being invoked. –  There is nothing we can do Oct 30 '10 at 15:43
    

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I slightly modified your main routine to understand the output better:

int main()
{
    std::cout << "default\n";
    Map m;

    std::cout << "\ncopy\n";
    Map m1(m);

    std::cout << "\nmove\n";
    Map m2(Map(m1));

    std::cout << "\nmove\n";
    Map m3(createMap());
}

And here is the output with g++ -fno-elide-constructors:

default
Map()

copy
Map(const Map& pattern)

move

move
Map()
Map(Map&& tmp)
Map(Map&& tmp)

As others already pointed out, Map m2(Map(m1)); is indeed a function declaration, so you get no output. The second move is not interpreted as a function declaration, because createMap is not a type name. There are two move constructors involved here. One moves the temporary object created by evaluating Map() into the temporary object created by evaluating createMap(), and the second move initializes m3 from the latter. This is exactly what one would expect.

If you fix the first move by writing Map m2((Map(m1))); the output becomes:

move
Map(const Map& pattern)
Map(Map&& tmp)

Again, no surprises. The copy constructor is invoked by evaluating Map(m1), and that temporary object is then moved into m2. If you compile without -fno-elide-constructors, the move operations disappear, because they are replaced by even more efficient optimizations like RVO or NRVO:

default
Map()

copy
Map(const Map& pattern)

move
Map(const Map& pattern)

move
Map()

I'm sure Visual C++ has a compiler option similar to -fno-elide-constructors that you can play with to understand move semantics better.

share|improve this answer
    
could you please check my edited post? –  There is nothing we can do Oct 30 '10 at 16:12
    
@There: As I already pointed out, most compilers are clever enough to apply even better optimizations, and thus moving is often not necessary. –  FredOverflow Oct 30 '10 at 16:17
Map m3(createMap());//<<---or at least here, but nope...

You are seeing return value optimization in action. In C++, the compiler is allowed to optimize away copying returned objects, and let the function work directly with the caller's object where the result is stored. There isn't any need to invoke the move constructor either.

Make the function more complicated, so that the compiler cannot use the optimization, and you'll see moving in action. For example:

Map createMap()
{
    Map a, b;
    if (rand())
        return a;
    return b;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer. But why this line (with m2 and invocation of createMap) isn't even called? The object m2 isn't created at all. –  There is nothing we can do Oct 30 '10 at 15:58
    
yes thanks it does work (the complication of createMap). Thanks. +1 –  There is nothing we can do Oct 30 '10 at 17:34

You're declaring a function, not an object:

T name (T(blah));

Is equivalent to:

T name(T blah);

Which is recognizable as a function declaration. You can use extra parens:

Map m2 ((Map(m1)));

This is called the most vexing parse.

share|improve this answer
    
@Roger and what about the last line? Clearly there is a fnc invocation, so it cannot be a declaration of another fnc. –  There is nothing we can do Oct 30 '10 at 15:36
    
@Roger None of your examples seems to work for me. In VS2010 having this code doesn't invoke move ctor and I think is should (the line where createMap() is called at least.) –  There is nothing we can do Oct 30 '10 at 15:42
    
@Roger and most of all your example with auto Map ... doesn't compile (in VS2010) –  There is nothing we can do Oct 30 '10 at 15:51
    
I could've sworn auto was usable like that, but I must be thinking of something else. –  Roger Pate Oct 30 '10 at 15:56
    
createMap does not name a type, right? Are you sure Map m3(createMap()); is really a function declaration then? –  FredOverflow Oct 30 '10 at 16:22

This program shows expected output.

#include <iostream>
using std::cout;

struct Map
{
    Map()
    {
        cout << "Map()\n";
    }
    Map(const Map& pattern)
    {
        cout << "Map(const Map&)\n";
    }
    Map(Map&& tmp)
    {
        cout << "Map(Map&&)\n";
    }
};

Map createMap()
{
    Map m;
    return m;
}

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    //dflt
    Map m;
    //cpy
    Map m1(m);
    //move
    Map m2 = createMap();//<<I thought that I create here tmp unnamed obj.
    std::cin.get();
    return 0;
}

Note the changes to createMap(). It doesn't employ a direct temporary but a named return value. This program shows the intended output on Visual Studio 2010.

share|improve this answer
    
So does VS not do NRVO? –  FredOverflow Oct 30 '10 at 16:23
1  
@FredOverflow: Not in debug mode. Of course, you don't see that output in Release mode. –  Puppy Oct 30 '10 at 16:32
    
thanks for your answer +1. So BASICALLY I got the whole move semantics idea right, I just wasn't aware of the optimizatiooon business. – There is nothing we can do 0 secs ago edit –  There is nothing we can do Oct 30 '10 at 17:33
Map createMap()
{
    return Map();
}

I would think that the compiler would've done an RVO (return value optimization) on the above, thus no temporaries would ever be created.

If you change it to the following, you should see your move ctor getting invoked.

Map createMap()
{
    Map m;
    m.DoSomething(); // this should make the compiler stop doing RVO
    return m;
}
  • Some compilers do RVO regardless of compiler settings (debug / release mode) - e.g. bcc32. I have a feeling VC would be the same.
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.