Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm sure there must be a simple way to do this, but I've been tearing my hair out for hours now and I'm getting nowhere. Here is a working query from a customer listing utility:

SELECT c.customer_ID, title, surname, forenames, COUNT(booking_ID) AS bookings
FROM customer c 
LEFT JOIN booking b 
ON c.customer_ID = b.customer_ID
WHERE customer_Live
GROUP BY c.customer_ID, surname, forenames, title
ORDER BY surname;

Here is the problem: the COUNT returns all of the related bookings. But the booking table has a 'booking_Live' column which is set to false whenever a booking is cancelled. What I need to do is somehow exclude cancelled bookings from the count; so if all a customer has is cancelled bookings, it will return 0. I've tried putting a HAVING clause on the group, but that just ends up removing any customers with zero live booking from the output.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Maybe I didn't get it well but why don't you use:

SELECT c.customer_ID, title, surname, forenames, COUNT(booking_ID) AS bookings
FROM customer c 
LEFT JOIN booking b 
ON (c.customer_ID = b.customer_ID AND b.booking_Live = true)
WHERE customer_Live
GROUP BY c.customer_ID, surname, forenames, title
ORDER BY surname;
share|improve this answer
    
You can't do that in MS Access. –  Fionnuala Oct 30 '10 at 18:25
    
Yes, that worked straight away! I tried something like that earlier, but I couldn't get the syntax right. Thank you. –  Antagony Oct 30 '10 at 18:27
    
@Remou: I don't whether it's the version of access (2007), or Jet (4)--or because it's an external app using ADO--but it does work. –  Antagony Oct 30 '10 at 18:40
    
It works... You just have to put your conditions for your join in parenthesis. –  Kamyar Oct 30 '10 at 19:00
1  
I don't understand why this is being done in a JOIN instead of in the WHERE clause. –  David-W-Fenton Oct 31 '10 at 0:56

A subquery should resolve your issue. Something like this.

SELECT c.customer_ID, title, surname, forenames, COUNT(booking_ID) AS bookings
FROM customer c 
LEFT JOIN (SELECT customer_ID, booking_id FROM Booking WHERE booking_live = true) as b 
ON c.customer_ID = b.customer_ID
WHERE customer_Live
GROUP BY c.customer_ID, surname, forenames, title
ORDER BY surname;
share|improve this answer
    
Apologies, I inadvertently posted to the wrong answer. Although I've checked yours and it also works. Thanks. –  Antagony Oct 30 '10 at 18:24
    
This also excludes any customers who have only cancelled bookings. –  David-W-Fenton Oct 31 '10 at 22:23
    
No, it doesn't. It's a left join, it will include all customers that are live, regardless of their booking status. –  KevenDenen Nov 1 '10 at 2:10

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.