Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

For example if I have the following HTML:

<div class="someDiv"></div>

and this CSS:

.opacity {
    filter:alpha(opacity=60);
    -moz-opacity:0.6;
    -khtml-opacity: 0.6;
    opacity: 0.6; 
}
.radius {
    border-top-left-radius: 15px;
    border-top-right-radius: 5px;
    -moz-border-radius-topleft: 10px;
    -moz-border-radius-topright: 10px;    
}

.someDiv {
    background: #000; height: 50px; width: 200px;

/*** How can I reference the opacity and radius classes here
     so this div has those generic rules applied to it as well ***/

}

Like how in scripting languages you have generic functions that are used often written at the top of the script and every time you need to use that function you simply call the function instead of repeating all the code every time.

share|improve this question
    
Is it not possible to change the HTML? –  BoltClock Oct 30 '10 at 19:55
    
You can just add a comma-separated list of classes in .radius, like .radius, .another, .element{/* css*/}. That will save you extra code, but makes it possibly less readable. –  Lekensteyn Oct 30 '10 at 19:56
add comment

3 Answers 3

up vote 16 down vote accepted

No, you cannot reference one rule-set from another.

You can, however, reuse selectors on multiple rule-sets within a stylesheet and use multiple selectors on a single rule-set (by separating them with a comma).

.opacity, .someDiv {
    filter:alpha(opacity=60);
    -moz-opacity:0.6;
    -khtml-opacity: 0.6;
    opacity: 0.6; 
}
.radius, .someDiv {
    border-top-left-radius: 15px;
    border-top-right-radius: 5px;
    -moz-border-radius-topleft: 10px;
    -moz-border-radius-topright: 10px;    
}

You can also apply multiple classes to a single HTML element (the class attribute takes a space separated list).

<div class="opacity radius">

Either of those approaches should solve your problem.

It would probably help if you used class names that described why an element should be styled instead of how it should be styled. Leave the how in the stylesheet.

share|improve this answer
add comment

You can't unless you're using some kind of extended CSS such as SASS. However it is very reasonable to apply those two extra classes to .someDiv.

If .someDiv is unique I would also choose to give it an id and referencing it in css using the id.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Just add the classes to your html

<div class="someDiv radius opacity"></div>
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.