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Is there a simple way to flatten a list of iterables with a list comprehension, or failing that, what would you all consider to be the best way to flatten a shallow list like this, balancing performance and readability?

I tried to flatten such a list with a nested list comprehension, like this:

[image for image in menuitem for menuitem in list_of_menuitems]

But I get in trouble of the NameError variety there, because the name 'menuitem' is not defined. After googling and looking around on Stack Overflow, I got the desired results with a reduce statement:

reduce(list.__add__, map(lambda x: list(x), list_of_menuitems))

But this method is fairly unreadable because I need that list(x) call there because x is a Django QuerySet object.

Conclusion:

Thanks to everyone who contributed to this question. Here is a summary of what I learned. I'm also making this a community wiki in case others want to add to or correct these observations.

My original reduce statement is redundant and is better written this way:

>>> reduce(list.__add__, (list(mi) for mi in list_of_menuitems))

This is the correct syntax for a nested list comprehension (Brilliant summary dF!):

>>> [image for mi in list_of_menuitems for image in mi]

But neither of these methods are as efficient as using itertools.chain:

>>> from itertools import chain
>>> list(chain(*list_of_menuitems))

And as @cdleary notes, it's probably better style to avoid * operator magic by using chain.from_iterable like so:

>>> chain = itertools.chain.from_iterable([[1,2],[3],[5,89],[],[6]])
>>> print(list(chain))
>>> [1, 2, 3, 5, 89, 6]
share|improve this question
12  
I don't get why everybody is using map(lambda x: list(x), other) -- isn't that equivalent to map(list, other)? The list builtin is callable... –  cdleary Jan 2 '09 at 19:14
    
It is equivalent. Luckily Prairie Dogg realized that this code is ugly. :) –  recursive Jan 2 '09 at 19:33
    
Oh yeah, I see that you pointed it out in your answer @recursive. Sorry for the redundancy! :-) –  cdleary Jan 2 '09 at 20:56
1  
@recursive: Yeah, I definitely blushed after you pointed out just how many things about my reduce statement were redundant. I definitely learned a lot from this question, so big thanks to everyone! –  Prairiedogg Jan 2 '09 at 23:29
1  
reduce(list.__add__, (list(mi.image_set.all()) for mi in list_of_menuitems)) is not correct for the case where all the lists are empty. It should be reduce(list.__add__, (list(mi.image_set.all()) for mi in list_of_menuitems), []) –  Daira Hopwood Jun 10 '12 at 11:59

15 Answers 15

up vote 129 down vote accepted

If you're just looking to iterate over a flattened version of the data structure and don't need an indexable sequence, consider itertools.chain and company.

>>> list_of_menuitems = [['image00', 'image01'], ['image10'], []]
>>> import itertools
>>> chain = itertools.chain(*list_of_menuitems)
>>> print(list(chain))
['image00', 'image01', 'image10']

It will work on anything that's iterable, which should include Django's iterable QuerySets, which it appears that you're using in the question.

Edit: This is probably as good as a reduce anyway, because reduce will have the same overhead copying the items into the list that's being extended. chain will only incur this (same) overhead if you run list(chain) at the end.

Meta-Edit: Actually, it's less overhead than the question's proposed solution, because you throw away the temporary lists you create when you extend the original with the temporary.

Edit: As J.F. Sebastian says itertools.chain.from_iterable avoids the unpacking and you should use that to avoid * magic, but the timeit app shows negligible performance difference.

share|improve this answer
    

You almost have it! The way to do nested list comprehensions is to put the for statements in the same order as they would go in regular nested for statements.

Thus, this

for inner_list in outer_list:
    for item in inner_list:
        ...

corresponds to

[... for inner_list in outer_list for item in inner_list]

So you want

[image for menuitem in list_of_menuitems for image in menuitem]
share|improve this answer
15  
+1, I have looked this up so many times and this is the only answer I've seen that's made the ordering explicit... Maybe now I can remember it! –  Izkata Mar 20 '12 at 15:47
2  
I wish I could up vote this again because this way of thinking makes nested list comprehensions much easier to understand. –  Derek Litz Jun 17 '13 at 21:36
    
whereas [... for item in inner_list for inner_list in outer_list] is a Python gotcha: it only repeats [... for item in inner_list] on the last value of inner_list, and as many times as len(outer_list). Useless. –  smci Sep 14 '13 at 4:47
    
This ordering is really odd. If you change for i in list: ... to ... for i in list, then why wouldn't you also change the order of the for loops? –  naught101 Nov 26 '13 at 6:38

@S.Lott: You inspired me to write a timeit app.

I figured it would also vary based on the number of partitions (number of iterators within the container list) -- your comment didn't mention how many partitions there were of the thirty items. This plot is flattening a thousand items in every run, with varying number of partitions. The items are evenly distributed among the partitions.

Flattening Comparison

Code (Python 2.6):

#!/usr/bin/env python2.6

"""Usage: %prog item_count"""

from __future__ import print_function

import collections
import itertools
import operator
from timeit import Timer
import sys

import matplotlib.pyplot as pyplot

def itertools_flatten(iter_lst):
    return list(itertools.chain(*iter_lst))

def itertools_iterable_flatten(iter_iter):
    return list(itertools.chain.from_iterable(iter_iter))

def reduce_flatten(iter_lst):
    return reduce(operator.add, map(list, iter_lst))

def reduce_lambda_flatten(iter_lst):
    return reduce(operator.add, map(lambda x: list(x), [i for i in iter_lst]))

def comprehension_flatten(iter_lst):
    return list(item for iter_ in iter_lst for item in iter_)

METHODS = ['itertools', 'itertools_iterable', 'reduce', 'reduce_lambda',
           'comprehension']

def _time_test_assert(iter_lst):
    """Make sure all methods produce an equivalent value.
    :raise AssertionError: On any non-equivalent value."""
    callables = (globals()[method + '_flatten'] for method in METHODS)
    results = [callable(iter_lst) for callable in callables]
    if not all(result == results[0] for result in results[1:]):
        raise AssertionError

def time_test(partition_count, item_count_per_partition, test_count=10000):
    """Run flatten methods on a list of :param:`partition_count` iterables.
    Normalize results over :param:`test_count` runs.
    :return: Mapping from method to (normalized) microseconds per pass.
    """
    iter_lst = [[dict()] * item_count_per_partition] * partition_count
    print('Partition count:    ', partition_count)
    print('Items per partition:', item_count_per_partition)
    _time_test_assert(iter_lst)
    test_str = 'flatten(%r)' % iter_lst
    result_by_method = {}
    for method in METHODS:
        setup_str = 'from test import %s_flatten as flatten' % method
        t = Timer(test_str, setup_str)
        per_pass = test_count * t.timeit(number=test_count) / test_count
        print('%20s: %.2f usec/pass' % (method, per_pass))
        result_by_method[method] = per_pass
    return result_by_method

if __name__ == '__main__':
    if len(sys.argv) != 2:
        raise ValueError('Need a number of items to flatten')
    item_count = int(sys.argv[1])
    partition_counts = []
    pass_times_by_method = collections.defaultdict(list)
    for partition_count in xrange(1, item_count):
        if item_count % partition_count != 0:
            continue
        items_per_partition = item_count / partition_count
        result_by_method = time_test(partition_count, items_per_partition)
        partition_counts.append(partition_count)
        for method, result in result_by_method.iteritems():
            pass_times_by_method[method].append(result)
    for method, pass_times in pass_times_by_method.iteritems():
        pyplot.plot(partition_counts, pass_times, label=method)
    pyplot.legend()
    pyplot.title('Flattening Comparison for %d Items' % item_count)
    pyplot.xlabel('Number of Partitions')
    pyplot.ylabel('Microseconds')
    pyplot.show()

Edit: Decided to make it community wiki.

Note: METHODS should probably be accumulated with a decorator, but I figure it'd be easier for people to read this way.

share|improve this answer
    
Try sum_flatten = lambda iter_lst: sum(map(list, iter_lst), []) –  J.F. Sebastian Jan 8 '09 at 16:34
12  
or just sum(list, []) –  hoju Sep 1 '09 at 6:32
    
@EnTerr suggested reduce(operator.iadd stackoverflow.com/questions/3040335/… that is the fastest so far (code: ideone.com/NWThp picture: i403.photobucket.com/albums/pp111/uber_ulrich/p1000.png ) –  J.F. Sebastian Jun 16 '10 at 12:43
1  
chain.from_iterable() is slightly faster if there are many partitions i403.photobucket.com/albums/pp111/uber_ulrich/p10000.png –  J.F. Sebastian Jun 16 '10 at 13:21
3  
I know this is an old thread but I added a method I got from here which uses list.extend which has shown to be the fastest across the board. graph updated gist –  Mike S Apr 5 '13 at 2:04

In Python 2.6, using chain.from_iterable():

>>> from itertools import chain
>>> list(chain.from_iterable(mi.image_set.all() for mi in h.get_image_menu()))

It avoids creating of intermediate list.

share|improve this answer

This solution works for arbitrary nesting depths - not just the "list of lists" depth that some (all?) of the other solutions are limited to:

def flatten(x):
    result = []
    for el in x:
        if hasattr(el, "__iter__") and not isinstance(el, basestring):
            result.extend(flatten(el))
        else:
            result.append(el)
    return result

It's the recursion which allows for arbitrary depth nesting - until you hit the maximum recursion depth, of course...

share|improve this answer
1  
It might be worth adding hasattr(el, '__getitem__') for compatibility with iter() function and builtin for-in loop (though all Python sequences (objects with __getitem__) also are iterable (object with __iter__)). –  J.F. Sebastian Mar 14 '09 at 10:56
    
i was expecting something like that already in itertools. are there similar solutions using comprehensions? –  Josep Valls Jun 18 '12 at 14:07
1  
This was the most useful to me as it doesn't separate strings. –  cdhagmann Jun 27 '13 at 20:49

Performance Results. Revised.

import itertools
def itertools_flatten( aList ):
    return list( itertools.chain(*aList) )

from operator import add
def reduce_flatten1( aList ):
    return reduce(add, map(lambda x: list(x), [mi for mi in aList]))

def reduce_flatten2( aList ):
    return reduce(list.__add__, map(list, aList))

def comprehension_flatten( aList ):
    return list(y for x in aList for y in x)

I flattened a 2-level list of 30 items 1000 times

itertools_flatten     0.00554
comprehension_flatten 0.00815
reduce_flatten2       0.01103
reduce_flatten1       0.01404

Reduce is always a poor choice.

share|improve this answer
2  
map(lambda x: list(x), [mi for mi in aList])) is a map(list, aList). –  J.F. Sebastian Jan 2 '09 at 20:33
    
reduce_flatten = lambda list_of_iters: reduce(list.__add__, map(list, list_of_iters)) –  J.F. Sebastian Jan 2 '09 at 20:41
    
itertools_flatten2 = lambda aList: list(itertools.chain.from_iterable(aList)) –  J.F. Sebastian Jan 4 '09 at 19:40
    
Don't have chain.from_iterable in 2.5.2 -- sorry -- can't compare with other solutions. –  S.Lott Jan 5 '09 at 0:29
    
@recursive's version: sum_flatten = lambda aList: sum(map(list, aList), []) –  J.F. Sebastian Jan 8 '09 at 16:31

sum(list of lists, []) would flatten it

>>> l=[['image00', 'image01'], ['image10'], []]
>>> print sum(l,[])
['image00', 'image01', 'image10']
share|improve this answer
    
Wow. I love this one. –  beroe Apr 17 at 5:57

Here is the correct solution using list comprehensions (they're backward in the question):

>>> join = lambda it: (y for x in it for y in x)
>>> list(join([[1,2],[3,4,5],[]]))
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5]

In your case it would be

[image for menuitem in list_of_menuitems for image in menuitem.image_set.all()]

or you could use join and say

join(menuitem.image_set.all() for menuitem in list_of_menuitems)

In either case, the gotcha was the nesting of the for loops.

share|improve this answer

Off the top of my head, you can eliminate the lambda:

reduce(list.__add__, map(list, [mi.image_set.all() for mi in list_of_menuitems]))

Or even eliminate the map, since you've already got a list-comp:

reduce(list.__add__, [list(mi.image_set.all()) for mi in list_of_menuitems])

You can also just express this as a sum of lists:

sum([list(mi.image_set.all()) for mi in list_of_menuitems], [])
share|improve this answer
    
You could just use add, and I believe the second argument to sum is redundant. –  daniel Jan 2 '09 at 6:30
    
It's not redundant. The default is zero, yielding TypeError: unsupported operand type(s) for +: 'int' and 'list'. IMO sum() is more direct than reduce(add, ...) –  recursive Jan 2 '09 at 6:52

What about:

from operator import add
reduce(add, map(lambda x: list(x.image_set.all()), [mi for mi in list_of_menuitems]))

But, Guido is recommending against performing too much in a single line of code since it reduces readability. There is minimal, if any, performance gain by performing what you want in a single line vs. multiple lines.

share|improve this answer
2  
It's incredibly satisfying performing some crazy amount of work in a single line... but it's really just syntactic suger –  daniel Jan 2 '09 at 6:37
1  
If I remember correctly, Guido is actually recommending against the use of reduce and list comprehensions as well... I disagree though, they are incredibly useful. –  daniel Jan 2 '09 at 6:39
1  
Check the performance of this little nugget versus a multi-line function. I think you'll find that this one-liner is a real dog. –  S.Lott Jan 2 '09 at 11:21
1  
probably, mapping with lambdas is horrible. the overhead incurred for each function call sucks the life out of your code. I never said that that particular line was as fast as a multiple line solution... ;) –  daniel Jan 3 '09 at 3:34

have you tried flatten? From matplotlib.cbook.flatten(seq, scalarp=) ?

l=[[1,2,3],[4,5,6], [7], [8,9]]*33

run("list(flatten(l))")
         3732 function calls (3303 primitive calls) in 0.007 seconds

   Ordered by: standard name

   ncalls  tottime  percall  cumtime  percall filename:lineno(function)
        1    0.000    0.000    0.007    0.007 <string>:1(<module>)
      429    0.001    0.000    0.001    0.000 cbook.py:475(iterable)
      429    0.002    0.000    0.003    0.000 cbook.py:484(is_string_like)
      429    0.002    0.000    0.006    0.000 cbook.py:565(is_scalar_or_string)
  727/298    0.001    0.000    0.007    0.000 cbook.py:605(flatten)
      429    0.000    0.000    0.001    0.000 core.py:5641(isMaskedArray)
      858    0.001    0.000    0.001    0.000 {isinstance}
      429    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 {iter}
        1    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 {method 'disable' of '_lsprof.Profiler' objects}



l=[[1,2,3],[4,5,6], [7], [8,9]]*66

run("list(flatten(l))")
         7461 function calls (6603 primitive calls) in 0.007 seconds

   Ordered by: standard name

   ncalls  tottime  percall  cumtime  percall filename:lineno(function)
        1    0.000    0.000    0.007    0.007 <string>:1(<module>)
      858    0.001    0.000    0.001    0.000 cbook.py:475(iterable)
      858    0.002    0.000    0.003    0.000 cbook.py:484(is_string_like)
      858    0.002    0.000    0.006    0.000 cbook.py:565(is_scalar_or_string)
 1453/595    0.001    0.000    0.007    0.000 cbook.py:605(flatten)
      858    0.000    0.000    0.001    0.000 core.py:5641(isMaskedArray)
     1716    0.001    0.000    0.001    0.000 {isinstance}
      858    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 {iter}
        1    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 {method 'disable' of '_lsprof.Profiler' objects}



l=[[1,2,3],[4,5,6], [7], [8,9]]*99

run("list(flatten(l))")
         11190 function calls (9903 primitive calls) in 0.010 seconds

   Ordered by: standard name

   ncalls  tottime  percall  cumtime  percall filename:lineno(function)
        1    0.000    0.000    0.010    0.010 <string>:1(<module>)
     1287    0.002    0.000    0.002    0.000 cbook.py:475(iterable)
     1287    0.003    0.000    0.004    0.000 cbook.py:484(is_string_like)
     1287    0.002    0.000    0.009    0.000 cbook.py:565(is_scalar_or_string)
 2179/892    0.001    0.000    0.010    0.000 cbook.py:605(flatten)
     1287    0.001    0.000    0.001    0.000 core.py:5641(isMaskedArray)
     2574    0.001    0.000    0.001    0.000 {isinstance}
     1287    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 {iter}
        1    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 {method 'disable' of '_lsprof.Profiler' objects}



l=[[1,2,3],[4,5,6], [7], [8,9]]*132

run("list(flatten(l))")
         14919 function calls (13203 primitive calls) in 0.013 seconds

   Ordered by: standard name

   ncalls  tottime  percall  cumtime  percall filename:lineno(function)
        1    0.000    0.000    0.013    0.013 <string>:1(<module>)
     1716    0.002    0.000    0.002    0.000 cbook.py:475(iterable)
     1716    0.004    0.000    0.006    0.000 cbook.py:484(is_string_like)
     1716    0.003    0.000    0.011    0.000 cbook.py:565(is_scalar_or_string)
2905/1189    0.002    0.000    0.013    0.000 cbook.py:605(flatten)
     1716    0.001    0.000    0.001    0.000 core.py:5641(isMaskedArray)
     3432    0.001    0.000    0.001    0.000 {isinstance}
     1716    0.001    0.000    0.001    0.000 {iter}
        1    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 {method 'disable' of '_lsprof.Profiler'

UPDATE Which gave me another idea:

l=[[1,2,3],[4,5,6], [7], [8,9]]*33

run("flattenlist(l)")
         564 function calls (432 primitive calls) in 0.000 seconds

   Ordered by: standard name

   ncalls  tottime  percall  cumtime  percall filename:lineno(function)
    133/1    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 <ipython-input-55-39b139bad497>:4(flattenlist)
        1    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 <string>:1(<module>)
      429    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 {isinstance}
        1    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 {method 'disable' of '_lsprof.Profiler' objects}



l=[[1,2,3],[4,5,6], [7], [8,9]]*66

run("flattenlist(l)")
         1125 function calls (861 primitive calls) in 0.001 seconds

   Ordered by: standard name

   ncalls  tottime  percall  cumtime  percall filename:lineno(function)
    265/1    0.001    0.000    0.001    0.001 <ipython-input-55-39b139bad497>:4(flattenlist)
        1    0.000    0.000    0.001    0.001 <string>:1(<module>)
      858    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 {isinstance}
        1    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 {method 'disable' of '_lsprof.Profiler' objects}



l=[[1,2,3],[4,5,6], [7], [8,9]]*99

run("flattenlist(l)")
         1686 function calls (1290 primitive calls) in 0.001 seconds

   Ordered by: standard name

   ncalls  tottime  percall  cumtime  percall filename:lineno(function)
    397/1    0.001    0.000    0.001    0.001 <ipython-input-55-39b139bad497>:4(flattenlist)
        1    0.000    0.000    0.001    0.001 <string>:1(<module>)
     1287    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 {isinstance}
        1    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 {method 'disable' of '_lsprof.Profiler' objects}



l=[[1,2,3],[4,5,6], [7], [8,9]]*132

run("flattenlist(l)")
         2247 function calls (1719 primitive calls) in 0.002 seconds

   Ordered by: standard name

   ncalls  tottime  percall  cumtime  percall filename:lineno(function)
    529/1    0.001    0.000    0.002    0.002 <ipython-input-55-39b139bad497>:4(flattenlist)
        1    0.000    0.000    0.002    0.002 <string>:1(<module>)
     1716    0.001    0.000    0.001    0.000 {isinstance}
        1    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 {method 'disable' of '_lsprof.Profiler' objects}



l=[[1,2,3],[4,5,6], [7], [8,9]]*1320

run("flattenlist(l)")
         22443 function calls (17163 primitive calls) in 0.016 seconds

   Ordered by: standard name

   ncalls  tottime  percall  cumtime  percall filename:lineno(function)
   5281/1    0.011    0.000    0.016    0.016 <ipython-input-55-39b139bad497>:4(flattenlist)
        1    0.000    0.000    0.016    0.016 <string>:1(<module>)
    17160    0.005    0.000    0.005    0.000 {isinstance}
        1    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 {method 'disable' of '_lsprof.Profiler' objects}

So to test how effective it is when recursive gets deeper: How much deeper?

l=[[1,2,3],[4,5,6], [7], [8,9]]*1320

new=[l]*33

run("flattenlist(new)")
         740589 function calls (566316 primitive calls) in 0.418 seconds

   Ordered by: standard name

   ncalls  tottime  percall  cumtime  percall filename:lineno(function)
 174274/1    0.281    0.000    0.417    0.417 <ipython-input-55-39b139bad497>:4(flattenlist)
        1    0.001    0.001    0.418    0.418 <string>:1(<module>)
   566313    0.136    0.000    0.136    0.000 {isinstance}
        1    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 {method 'disable' of '_lsprof.Profiler' objects}



new=[l]*66

run("flattenlist(new)")
         1481175 function calls (1132629 primitive calls) in 0.809 seconds

   Ordered by: standard name

   ncalls  tottime  percall  cumtime  percall filename:lineno(function)
 348547/1    0.542    0.000    0.807    0.807 <ipython-input-55-39b139bad497>:4(flattenlist)
        1    0.002    0.002    0.809    0.809 <string>:1(<module>)
  1132626    0.266    0.000    0.266    0.000 {isinstance}
        1    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 {method 'disable' of '_lsprof.Profiler' objects}



new=[l]*99

run("flattenlist(new)")
         2221761 function calls (1698942 primitive calls) in 1.211 seconds

   Ordered by: standard name

   ncalls  tottime  percall  cumtime  percall filename:lineno(function)
 522820/1    0.815    0.000    1.208    1.208 <ipython-input-55-39b139bad497>:4(flattenlist)
        1    0.002    0.002    1.211    1.211 <string>:1(<module>)
  1698939    0.393    0.000    0.393    0.000 {isinstance}
        1    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 {method 'disable' of '_lsprof.Profiler' objects}



new=[l]*132

run("flattenlist(new)")
         2962347 function calls (2265255 primitive calls) in 1.630 seconds

   Ordered by: standard name

   ncalls  tottime  percall  cumtime  percall filename:lineno(function)
 697093/1    1.091    0.000    1.627    1.627 <ipython-input-55-39b139bad497>:4(flattenlist)
        1    0.003    0.003    1.630    1.630 <string>:1(<module>)
  2265252    0.536    0.000    0.536    0.000 {isinstance}
        1    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 {method 'disable' of '_lsprof.Profiler' objects}



new=[l]*1320

run("flattenlist(new)")
         29623443 function calls (22652523 primitive calls) in 16.103 seconds

   Ordered by: standard name

   ncalls  tottime  percall  cumtime  percall filename:lineno(function)
6970921/1   10.842    0.000   16.069   16.069 <ipython-input-55-39b139bad497>:4(flattenlist)
        1    0.034    0.034   16.103   16.103 <string>:1(<module>)
 22652520    5.227    0.000    5.227    0.000 {isinstance}
        1    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 {method 'disable' of '_lsprof.Profiler' objects}

I will bet "flattenlist" I am going to use this rather than matploblib for a long long time unless I want a yield generator and fast result as "flatten" uses in matploblib.cbook

This, is fast.

  • And here is the code

:

typ=(list,tuple)


def flattenlist(d):
    thelist = []
    for x in d:
        if not isinstance(x,typ):
            thelist += [x]
        else:
            thelist += flattenlist(x)
    return thelist
share|improve this answer

This version is a generator.Tweak it if you want a list.

def list_or_tuple(l):
    return isinstance(l,(list,tuple))
## predicate will select the container  to be flattened
## write your own as required
## this one flattens every list/tuple


def flatten(seq,predicate=list_or_tuple):        
    ## recursive generator 
    for i in seq:
        if predicate(seq):
            for j in flatten(i):
                yield j
        else:
            yield i

You can add a predicate ,if want to flatten those which satisfy a condition

Taken from python cookbook

share|improve this answer

From my experience, the most efficient way to flatten a list of lists is:

flat_list = []
map(flat_list.extend, list_of_list)

Some timeit comparisons with the other proposed methods:

list_of_list = [range(10)]*1000
%timeit flat_list=[]; map(flat_list.extend, list_of_list)
#10000 loops, best of 3: 119 µs per loop
%timeit flat_list=list(itertools.chain.from_iterable(list_of_list))
#1000 loops, best of 3: 210 µs per loop
%timeit flat_list=[i for sublist in list_of_list for i in sublist]
#1000 loops, best of 3: 525 µs per loop
%timeit flat_list=reduce(list.__add__,list_of_list)
#100 loops, best of 3: 18.1 ms per loop

Now, the efficiency gain appears better when processing longer sublists:

list_of_list = [range(1000)]*10
%timeit flat_list=[]; map(flat_list.extend, list_of_list)
#10000 loops, best of 3: 60.7 µs per loop
%timeit flat_list=list(itertools.chain.from_iterable(list_of_list))
#10000 loops, best of 3: 176 µs per loop

And this methods also works with any iterative object:

class SquaredRange(object):
    def __init__(self, n): 
        self.range = range(n)
    def __iter__(self):
        for i in self.range: 
            yield i**2

list_of_list = [SquaredRange(5)]*3
flat_list = []
map(flat_list.extend, list_of_list)
print flat_list
#[0, 1, 4, 9, 16, 0, 1, 4, 9, 16, 0, 1, 4, 9, 16]
share|improve this answer

pylab provides a flatten: link to numpy flatten

share|improve this answer

In Python 3.4 you will be able to do:

[*innerlist for innerlist in outer_list]
share|improve this answer
    
Hm. While I'd welcome this, this was already discussed way back for Py3.0. Now the PEP 448 is there, but still in 'Draft' mode. The related bug ticket is still in 'patch review' with a yet incomplete patch. Until the bug isn't marked as 'commited' I'd be careful with getting hopes up and saying 'you will be abled to do'. –  cfi Sep 27 '13 at 17:33
    
I get what you mean but it was recently announced at Kiwi PyCon 2013 by one of the core developers as "accepted for release" in 3.4. Still not 100% sure but I guess highly probable. –  elyase Sep 27 '13 at 21:09
    
Let's both hope it's just the docs lacking behind code as usual for sw before any release ;-) –  cfi Sep 27 '13 at 22:12

protected by Jon Clements Mar 16 '13 at 15:39

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