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I am trying to import a .sql file and its failing on creating tables.

Here's the query that fails:

CREATE TABLE `data` (
`id` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL,
`name` varchar(100) NOT NULL,
`value` varchar(15) NOT NULL,
UNIQUE KEY `id` (`id`,`name`),
CONSTRAINT `data_ibfk_1` FOREIGN KEY (`id`) REFERENCES `keywords` (`id`) ON DELETE CASCADE ON UPDATE CASCADE
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1;    

I exported the .sql from the the same database, I dropped all the tables and now im trying to import it, why is it failing?

MySQL: Can't create table './dbname/data.frm' (errno: 150)

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For essentially all the causes of this error, here is an exhaustive resource for what causes errno 150 (and errno 121/other foreign key errors) in MySQL. –  John Smith Sep 29 '12 at 0:47
5  
I've found that the columns must be identical (even the unsigned flag must match). –  Justin Skiles Dec 19 '12 at 19:54
    
@JohnSmith ... where? –  Charles Wood Jul 29 '13 at 17:07
1  
I suggest reading this blog post that lists 10 possible causes: verysimple.com/2006/10/22/… –  Mark Amery Jan 2 at 13:54

18 Answers 18

up vote 69 down vote accepted

From the MySQL - FOREIGN KEY Constraints Documentation:

If you re-create a table that was dropped, it must have a definition that conforms to the foreign key constraints referencing it. It must have the right column names and types, and it must have indexes on the referenced keys, as stated earlier. If these are not satisfied, MySQL returns error number 1005 and refers to error 150 in the error message.

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1  
Can two columns from one table reference one column from another table, where it is PK? –  Eugene Nov 5 '11 at 0:16
1  
@Eugene: Each of the two columns can have a foreign key relationship to the PK in another table -- not both columns as a single foreign key relationship. –  OMG Ponies Nov 5 '11 at 1:04
    
@OMGPonies: Thanks for answering this Question!..I was looking for it...I also asked a question here stackoverflow.com/questions/13487010/… ....Although I have some good answers but I want to be conform Whether its possible to write Nested Query for my problem? ..I would request you to please answer me too! –  Grijesh Chauhan Nov 21 '12 at 15:32
6  
My error was master table had MyISAM and child table InnoDB engine. Current create.sql script was using InnoDB for all tables, but I had very very old installation where first script used MyISAM. –  Whome Apr 8 '13 at 9:50
1  
@Whome - Yep, ran into the same issue here. –  aroth Jun 28 '13 at 5:33

Error 150 means you have a problem with your foreign key. Possibly the key on the foreign table isn't the exact same type?

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2  
Thanks :) for me, the data types are INT but one unsigned while the other is not –  Anh Nguyen Mar 4 at 9:20

Data types must match exactly. If you are dealing with varchar types, the tables must use the same collation.

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1  
Thanks for the collation bit. –  arahant May 25 at 18:00

Error no. 150 means a foreign key constraint failure. You are probably creating this table before the table the foreign key depends on (table keywords). Create that table first and it should work fine.

If it doesn't, remove the foreign key statement and add it after the table is created - you will get a more meaningful error message about the specific constraint failure.

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In some cases, you may encounter this error message if there are different engines between the relating tables. For example, a table may be using InnoDB while the other uses MyISAM. Both need to be same

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I think all these answers while correct are misleading to the question.

The actual answer is this before you start a restore, if you're restoring a dump file with foreign keys:

SET FOREIGN_KEY_CHECKS=0;

because naturally the restore will be creating some constraints before the foreign table even exists.

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Sometimes MySQL is just super stupid - i can understand the reason cause of foreign-keys.. but in my case, i have just dropped the whole database, and i still get the error... why? i mean, there is no database anymore... and the sql-user i'm using has no access to any other db's on the server... i mean, the server is "empty" for the current user and i still get this error? Sorry but i guess MySQL is lying to me... but i can deal with it :) Just add these two lines of SQL around your fucky statement:

SET FOREIGN_KEY_CHECKS = 0;
# some code that gives you errno: 150
SET FOREIGN_KEY_CHECKS = 1;

Now the sql should be executed... If you really have a foreign-key problem, it would show up to you by the line where you will enable the checks again - this will fail then.. but my server is just quiet :)

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150 is usually a foreign key error. Are you sure the keywords table exist?

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If the PK table is created in one CHARSET and then you create FK table in another CHARSET..then also you might get this error...I too got this error but after changing the charset to PK charset then it got executed without errors

create table users
(
------------
-------------
)DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1;


create table Emp
(
---------
---------
---------
FOREIGN KEY (userid) REFERENCES users(id) on update cascade on delete cascade)ENGINE=InnoDB, DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1;
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After cruising through the answers above, and experimenting a bit, this is an effective way to solve Foreign Key errors in MySQL (1005 - error 150).

For the foreign key to be properly created, all MySQL asks for is:

  • All referenced keys MUST have either PRIMARY or UNIQUE index.
  • Referencing Column again MUST have identical data type to the Referenced column.

Satisfy these requirements and all will be well.

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This error can occur if two tables have a reference, for example, one table is Student and another table is Education, and we want the Education table to have a foreign key reference of Student table. In this instance the column data type for both tables should be same, otherwise it will generate an error.

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Change the engines of your tables, only innoDB supports foreign keys

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Perhaps this will help? The definition of the primary key column should be exactly the same as the foreign key column.

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Make sure that the all tables can support foreign key - InnoDB engine

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Please make sure both your primary key column and referenced column have the same data types and attributes (unsigned, binary, unsigned zerofill etc).

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I experienced this error when have ported Windows application to Linux. In Windows, database table names are case-insensitive, and in Linux they are case-sensitive, probably because of file system difference. So, on Windows table Table1 is the same as table1, and in REFERENCES both table1 and Table1 works. On Linux, when application used table1 instead of Table1 when it created database structure I saw error #150; when I made correct character case in Table1 references, it started to work on Linux too. So, if nothing else helps, make you sure that in REFERENCES you use correct character case in table name when you on Linux.

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You can get the actual error message by running SHOW ENGINE INNODB STATUS; and then looking for LATEST FOREIGN KEY ERROR in the output.

Source: answer from another user in a similar question

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Try:

CREATE TABLE `data` (
  `id` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL,
  `name` varchar(100) NOT NULL,
  `value` varchar(15) NOT NULL,
UNIQUE KEY `id` (`id`,`name`),
CONSTRAINT `data_ibfk_1`,
FOREIGN KEY (`id`) REFERENCES `keywords` (`id`) ON DELETE CASCADE ON UPDATE CASCADE
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1;  

You need to put a "," between CONSTRAINT and FOREIGN.

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