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Say I have two versions of a gem installed (somegem versions 0.10.6 and 0.10.5) and I want to run the earlier version from the commandline. Do I have to uninstall the newer version? Is there a way I can use a flag to specify which version I want to use? Something like...

somegem /path/to/dir --version 0.10.5

I checked the rubygems documentation, and it only describes how to use a specific version when you require a gem from a file, but nothing about how to do it from the commandline.

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Why would you "load a gem" from the command line? Surely there's no point unless you're using the gem inside Ruby code (and then, you follow the instructions for requiring it from a file...) –  Gareth Oct 31 '10 at 2:52
    
I'm not trying to load, but simply run the binaries of a gem. Surely they are not the same thing. I need to have the run the older versions at times, or I'd like to run a gem I have modified, but also run the original gem when necessary. Since they are both named "somegem" Ruby can't tell the difference and uses the latest version's binary. –  picardo Oct 31 '10 at 4:50

1 Answer 1

up vote 25 down vote accepted
somegem _0.10.5_ /path/to/dir

No link to documentation, because apparently there isn't any.

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Do you reckon it's because the Rubygems folk are lax with documentation, or that this functionality is somewhat unsupported, or a mixture of the two? –  Andrew Grimm Oct 31 '10 at 23:12
    
This (actually, ruby -S somegem _1.4.3_, because somegem defaulted to running ruby1.9.1) worked for me with rubygems 1.8.15. –  Andrew Grimm Oct 15 '12 at 3:27
    
Apparently it is done in the install script, where the command being executed is actually wrapped to add this behavior github.com/rubygems/rubygems/blob/… but I also could not find it documented anywhere –  Felipe Sabino Oct 2 at 14:55

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