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I know it is possible to match for the word and using tools options reverse the match. (eg. by grep -v) However I want to know if it is possible using regular expressions to match lines which does not contain a specific word, say hede?

Input:

Hoho
Hihi
Haha
hede

# grep "Regex for do not contain hede" Input

Output:

Hoho
Hihi
Haha
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25  
Probably a couple years late, but what's wrong with: ([^h]*(h([^e]|$)|he([^d]|$)|hed([^e]|$)))*? The idea is simple. Keep matching until you see the start of the unwanted string, then only match in the N-1 cases where the string is unfinished (where N is the length of the string). These N-1 cases are "h followed by non-e", "he followed by non-d", and "hed followed by non-e". If you managed to pass these N-1 cases, you successfully didn't match the unwanted string so you can start looking for [^h]* again –  stevendesu Sep 29 '11 at 3:44
62  
@stevendesu: try this for 'a-very-very-long-word' or even better half a sentence. Have fun typing. BTW, it is nearly unreadable. Don't know about the performance impact. –  Peter Schuetze Jan 30 '12 at 18:45
3  
@PeterSchuetze: Sure it's not pretty for very very long words, but it is a viable and correct solution. Although I haven't run tests on the performance, I wouldn't imagine it being too slow since most of the latter rules are ignored until you see an h (or the first letter of the word, sentence, etc.). And you could easily generate the regex string for long strings using iterative concatenation. If it works and can be generated quickly, is legibility important? That's what comments are for. –  stevendesu Feb 2 '12 at 3:14
12  
@stevendesu: i'm even later, but that answer is almost completely wrong. for one thing, it requires the subject to contain "h" which it shouldn't have to, given the task is "match lines which [do] not contain a specific word". let us assume you meant to make the inner group optional, and that the pattern is anchored: ^([^h]*(h([^e]|$)|he([^d]|$)|hed([^e]|$))?)*$ this fails when instances of "hede" are preceded by partial instances of "hede" such as in "hhede". –  jaytea Sep 10 '12 at 10:41
2  
An earlier question/answer for the same problem is available here: [link]stackoverflow.com/questions/116819/… The answers are similar, but might be interesting. –  Tim Jan 16 '13 at 10:32
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11 Answers

up vote 1826 down vote accepted

The fact that regex doesn't support inverse matching is not entirely true. You can mimic this behavior by using negative look-arounds:

^((?!hede).)*$

The regex above will match any string, or line without a line break, not containing the (sub) string 'hede'. As mentioned, this is not something regex is "good" at (or should do), but still, it is possible.

And if you need to match line break chars as well, use the DOT-ALL modifier (the trailing s in the following pattern):

/^((?!hede).)*$/s

or use it inline:

/(?s)^((?!hede).)*$/

(where the /.../ are the regex delimiters, ie, not part of the pattern)

If the DOT-ALL modifier is not available, you can mimic the same behavior with the character class [\s\S]:

/^((?!hede)[\s\S])*$/

Explanation

A string is just a list of n characters. Before, and after each character, there's an empty string. So a list of n characters will have n+1 empty strings. Consider the string "ABhedeCD":

    +--+---+--+---+--+---+--+---+--+---+--+---+--+---+--+---+--+
S = |e1| A |e2| B |e3| h |e4| e |e5| d |e6| e |e7| C |e8| D |e9|
    +--+---+--+---+--+---+--+---+--+---+--+---+--+---+--+---+--+

index    0      1      2      3      4      5      6      7

where the e's are the empty strings. The regex (?!hede). looks ahead to see if there's no substring "hede" to be seen, and if that is the case (so something else is seen), then the . (dot) will match any character except a line break. Look-arounds are also called zero-width-assertions because they don't consume any characters. They only assert/validate something.

So, in my example, every empty string is first validated to see if there's no "hede" up ahead, before a character is consumed by the . (dot). The regex (?!hede). will do that only once, so it is wrapped in a group, and repeated zero or more times: ((?!hede).)*. Finally, the start- and end-of-input are anchored to make sure the entire input is consumed: ^((?!hede).)*$

As you can see, the input "ABhedeCD" will fail because on e3, the regex (?!hede) fails (there is "hede" up ahead!).

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1  
@dskanth, not sure what you mean, but please, feel free to create a question of your own! –  Bart Kiers Mar 14 '11 at 14:33
8  
@Wilderness, you'll have to do that in two steps: make sure there's "alpha" somewhere, and make sure there's no "beta". The combined regex would look like: (?m)^(?=.*alpha)((?!beta).)*$. Note that the (?m) causes ^ and $ to treat start- and end-of-lines to be matched respectively (opposed to start- and end-of-input). Also added an explanation in my answer. –  Bart Kiers May 19 '11 at 18:49
3  
Also, if you need to capture the string (if it passes the test) into a backreference group, you need to wrap an extra set of brackets around the asterisk: ^(((?!hede).)*)$ -- I needed to do this for an Apache redirect rule. –  Simon Aug 19 '11 at 0:04
4  
how about ^(?!.*hede) –  Elroy Flynn Jan 1 '12 at 3:37
1  
Where are the empty strings coming from? Is this how it is represented in regex parlance? Why do they have to resort to such fancy representation? –  Mrchief Jan 12 '12 at 15:13
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Note that the solution to does not start with “hede”:

^(?!hede).*$

is generally much more efficient than the solution to does not contain “hede”:

^((?!hede).)*$

The former checks for “hede” only at the input string’s first position, rather than at every position.

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35  
The OP's example was ambiguous, but the question wasn't: he wanted a pure-regex equivalent for grep -v, which means does not contain, not does not start with. –  Alan Moore Mar 17 '11 at 12:10
1  
You're right. But I saw the anchors ^ and $ in another answer which threw me off (implying we are checking the entire string only). –  FireCoding Mar 17 '11 at 19:52
8  
Your answer is still useful as it expands on OP's problem. I upvoted it! –  slashline Aug 25 '11 at 20:01
    
This solved my problem where I was trying to find does not start with. –  abelito Nov 28 '11 at 14:40
7  
Maybe you could add some text to your answer to make it more obvious that it's only a solution to 'does not start with'. –  Rory Jun 19 '12 at 11:40
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If you're just using it for grep, you can use grep -v hede to get all lines which do not contain hede.

ETA Oh, rereading the question, grep -v is probably what you meant by "tools options".

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The given answers are perfectly fine, just an academic point:

Regular Expressions in the meaning of theoretical computer sciences ARE NOT ABLE do it like this. For them it had to look something like this:

^([^h].*$)|(h([^e].*$|$))|(he([^h].*$|$))|(heh([^e].*$|$))|(hehe.+$) 

This only does a FULL match. Doing it for sub-matches would even be more awkward.

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Important to note this only uses basic POSIX.2 regular expressions and thus whilst terse is more portable for when PCRE is not available. –  Steve-o Feb 19 at 17:25
    
I agree. Many if not most regular expressions are not regular languages and could not be recognized by a finite automata. –  ThomasMcLeod Mar 22 at 21:36
    
Who is this helpful to? –  JohnAllen Apr 3 at 6:06
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Here's a good explanation of why it's not easy to negate an arbitrary regex. I have to agree with the other answers, though: if this is anything other than a hypothetical question, then a regex is not the right choice here.

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3  
Some tools, and specifically mysqldumpslow, only offer this way to filter data, so in such a case, finding a regex to do this is the best solution apart from rewriting the tool (various patches for this have not been included by MySQL AB / Sun / Oracle. –  FGM Aug 7 '12 at 12:21
    
Exactly analagous to my situation. Velocity template engine uses regular expressions to decide when to apply a transformation (escape html) and I want it to always work EXCEPT in one situation. –  SlowStrider Oct 18 '13 at 14:43
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Not regex, but I've found it logical and useful to use serial greps with pipe to eliminate noise.

eg. search an apache config file without all the comments-

grep -v '\#' /opt/lampp/etc/httpd.conf      # this gives all the non-comment lines

and

grep -v '\#' /opt/lampp/etc/httpd.conf |  grep -i dir

The logic of serial grep's is (not a comment) and (matches dir)

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2  
I think he is asking for the regex version of the grep -v –  Angel.King.47 Jul 12 '11 at 15:27
2  
This is dangerous. Also misses lines like good_stuff #comment_stuff –  Xavi Montero Mar 1 '13 at 19:54
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If you want the regex test to only fail if the entire string matches, the following will work:

^(?!hede$).*

e.g. -- If you want to allow all values except "foo" (i.e. "foofoo", "barfoo", and "foobar" will pass, but "foo" will fail), use: ^(?!foo$).*

Of course, if you're checking for exact equality, a better general solution in this case is to check for string equality, i.e.

myStr !== 'foo'

You could even put the negation outside the test if you need any regex features (here, case insensitivity and range matching):

!/^[a-f]oo$/i.test(myStr)

The regex solution at the top may be helpful, however, in situations where a positive regex test is required (perhaps by an API).

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with this, you avoid to test a lookahead on each positions:

/^(?:[^h]++|h++(?!ede))*+$/
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5  
Good point; I'm surprised nobody mentioned this approach before. However, that particular regex is prone to catastrophic backtracking when applied to text that doesn't match. Here's how I would do it: /^[^h]*(?:h+(?!ede)[^h]*)*$/ –  Alan Moore Apr 14 '13 at 5:26
    
...or you can just make all the quantifiers possessive. ;) –  Alan Moore Apr 15 '13 at 15:17
    
@Alan Moore - I'm surprised too. I saw your comment (and best regex in the pile) here only after posting this same pattern in an answer below. –  ridgerunner Dec 20 '13 at 3:08
    
@ridgerunner, doesn't have to be the best tho. I've seen benchmarks where the top answer performs better. (I was surprised about that tho.) –  Qtax Feb 20 at 13:10
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If you want to match a character to negate a word similar to negate character class:

For example, a string:

<?
$str="aaa        bbb4      aaa     bbb7";
?>

Do not use:

<?
preg_match('/aaa[^bbb]+?bbb7/s', $str, $matches);
?>

Use:

<?
preg_match('/aaa(?:(?!bbb).)+?bbb7/s', $str, $matches);
?>

Notice "(?!bbb)." is neither lookbehind nor lookahead, it's lookcurrent, for example:

"(?=abc)abcde", "(?!abc)abcde"
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1  
There is no "lookcurrent" in perl regexp's. This is truly a negative lookahead (prefix (?!). Positive lookahead's prefix would be (?= while the corresponding lookbehind prefixes would be (?<! and (?<= respectively. A lookahead means that you read the next characters (hence “ahead”) without consuming them. A lookbehind means that you check characters that have already been consumed. –  Didier L May 21 '12 at 16:35
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The OP did not specify or Tag the post to indicate the context (programming language, editor, tool) the Regex will be used within.

For me, I sometimes need to do this while editing a file using Textpad.

Textpad supports some Regex, but does not support lookahead or lookbehind, so it takes a few steps.

If I am looking to retain all lines that Do NOT contain the string hede, I would do it like this:

1. Search/replace the entire file to add a unique "Tag" to the beginning of each line containing any text.

    Search string:^(.)  
    Replace string:<@#-unique-#@>\1  
    Replace-all  

2. Delete all lines that contain the string hede (replacement string is empty):

    Search string:<@#-unique-#@>.*hede.*\n  
    Replace string:<nothing>  
    Replace-all  

3. At this point, all remaining lines Do NOT contain the string hede. Remove the unique "Tag" from all lines (replacement string is empty):

    Search string:<@#-unique-#@>
    Replace string:<nothing>  
    Replace-all  

Now you have the original text with all lines containing the string hede removed.


If I am looking to Do Something Else to only lines that Do NOT contain the string hede, I would do it like this:

1. Search/replace the entire file to add a unique "Tag" to the beginning of each line containing any text.

    Search string:^(.)  
    Replace string:<@#-unique-#@>\1  
    Replace-all  

2. For all lines that contain the string hede, remove the unique "Tag":

    Search string:<@#-unique-#@>(.*hede)
    Replace string:\1  
    Replace-all  

3. At this point, all lines that begin with the unique "Tag", Do NOT contain the string hede. I can now do my Something Else to only those lines.

4. When I am done, I remove the unique "Tag" from all lines (replacement string is empty):

    Search string:<@#-unique-#@>
    Replace string:<nothing>  
    Replace-all  
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Here's how I'd do it:

^[^h]*(h(?!ede)[^h]*)*$

Accurate and more efficient than the other answers. It implements Friedl's "unrolling-the-loop" efficiency technique and requires much less backtracking.

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