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I have this script provided by @Felix Kling in this post HERE, but is crashing my IE when I use it; on FF 3.6, Opera, Chrome, Safari work fine.

Any idea why is this happening? A fix maybe?

var ajaxTimeout;

function autorun() {
    if ($("#contactForm").is(":visible")){
        if(ajaxTimeout) {
            clearInterval(ajaxTimeout);
            ajaxTimeout = false;
        }
    }
    else if(!ajaxTimeout) {
        ajaxTimeout = setInterval("refreshAjax();", 15000);
    }
}


$(function autorun() {
    setInterval("autorun();", 2000)
});

Thanks,

Cristian.

LE. Sorry, forgot to add details about that.

IE just closes, "encounter an error and needs to close, looking for a solution ...". IE 8.0 Windows7. If I load the page, I cannot open the debugger from the developer tools, but if I open the debugger before I load that page and press Start debug it doesn't show any errors or anything, but the page is not refreshing the grid as it was suppose to.

share|improve this question
    
Define "crashing". What error messages do you get? –  Pekka 웃 Oct 31 '10 at 9:01
    
I updated the question. Thx. –  Chris19 Oct 31 '10 at 9:09

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here's what you're after:

$(function () {
  var ajaxTimeout;
  function autorun() {
    if ($("#contactForm").is(":visible")){
      if(ajaxTimeout) {
        clearInterval(ajaxTimeout);
        ajaxTimeout = false;
      }
    }
    else if(!ajaxTimeout) {
      ajaxTimeout = setInterval(refreshAjax, 15000);
    }
  }
  setInterval(autorun, 2000);
});

IE doesn't at all like named functions used like this, and it's overriding the previously defined one. This is a long-standing bug not fixed until IE9. The core of the problem is that $(function autorun() { is taking over the autorun name, which is just queuing more and more runs of itself.

Also, it's better to pass function references to setInterval() directly, not strings.

share|improve this answer
    
Spot on, Nick. Works perfectly. Thanks so much, was driving me crazy. –  Chris19 Oct 31 '10 at 9:30
    
@Chris19 - you're certainly not the first, many developers got a little balder with this one :) –  Nick Craver Oct 31 '10 at 9:31

I suspect that this is the culprit:

$(function autorun() {
    setInterval("autorun();", 2000)
});

That's not really valid javascript. I think it's probably supposed to be something like:

$(document).ready(function() {
   setInterval("autorun();", 2000);
});

[edit: there was an error in my suggestion above, and I have corrected it. I was incorrectly assigning the result of setInterval(...) to the variable ajaxTimeout. This ultimately caused the logic inside the main autorun() function to never initiate its interval on refreshAjax(), thus causing the code to appear to "do nothing".]


[edit: some have indicated that my suggestion was offered without enough explanation, so I'll try to provide that here.]

  • you were declaring function autorun() twice. Once at the top, and again in the bottom section where I've suggested that you should make changes. Both declarations are in the same scope, so the names will collide and behavior will be browser-dependent. Some browsers will let one function "hide" the other, while other browsers will (probably) refuse to compile it.

  • you have used a named function declaration (the second declaration of autorun) in an "inline" context. This may be allowed by some browsers (and some have suggested that it is actually valid by the standard -- though admittedly I thought it was not), but it will definitely cause problems in IE.

  • My suggestion changes the second declaration into an anonymous declaration so as to kill two birds with one stone: avoid a name collision, and use syntax that is supported across all browsers.

  • finally, I introduced the use of $(document).ready(...), because it's standard practice these days, when programming with jQuery. You can read more about it on jQuery's site. Long story short - it is directly equivalent to the $(function() {...}) syntax that you've used, so you can take it or leave it as you please.

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1  
I'd recommend just passing the function in too instead of a string to eval –  Russ Cam Oct 31 '10 at 9:10
    
Capturing the return value is useful if you want to step the timer at some point, but otherwise entirely optional. –  Quentin Oct 31 '10 at 9:20
    
Nope, doesn't work. Is not even refreshing the grid anymore in FF or chrome. –  Chris19 Oct 31 '10 at 9:21
    
It is probably a good idea to not make three separate changes to a piece of code and describe them with nothing more than "That's not really valid javascript" — it obscures the point. –  Quentin Oct 31 '10 at 9:21
1  
@Lee — Don't make assumptions about where down votes come from. –  Quentin Oct 31 '10 at 18:17

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