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I have a fairly standard MFC application that consists of a main window, and occasionally brings up modal dialogs. As we all know nothing can be done outside a modal dialog until it is closed.

Therefore, a nice UI feature is to "dim" the rest of the main window behind the dialog, to visually indicate you can't use it until you're done with the modal dialog. Some web apps and java/mac apps do this, but I've never seen it done in a traditional C++/MFC application. I'd like to give it a try, even if it's unusual for the platform.

How can this be done? I have several modal dialogs in the application, used in this pattern:

// pMainFrame is available as a pointer to the CWnd of the main window
CMyDialog dialog;
dialog.DoModal(); // invoke modal dialog; returns after dialog closed

Is there an easy way to have the window dimmed before any DoModal() and restored afterwards? I'm using Visual Studio 2010 in case the updated MFC has any features that might help.

Edit: I've posted a solution based on oystein's answer, but I'm starting a bounty in case anyone can improve on it - especially with a smooth fade in/fade out.

share|improve this question
    
At first, what is dimmed? Can you supply a screenshot of wanted behavior? –  Daniel Mošmondor Oct 31 '10 at 16:43
    
Found this off Google Images, it's a web page that dims the rest of the page around a dialog: irritatedvowel.com/pub/blog/… - like that but dimming the main window of an application while a dialog is up. –  AshleysBrain Oct 31 '10 at 16:58

3 Answers 3

up vote 11 down vote accepted
+150

You can create another window, completely black, on top of the window you want to dim, and set the black window's opacity with SetLayeredWindowAttributes. It doesn't have to be black, of course, but I guess that's the best dimming color.

EDIT: I hacked together an example - but note that I am not an MFC developer, I usually use the Windows API directly. It seems to work okay, though. Here is a pastebin. Feel free to add fade-ins etc. yourself. Also note that this dims the entire screen, you'll have to resize my dimming-window if you don't want this behaviour. See code comments.

/**********************************************************************************************

    MFC screen dim test
        :: oystein          :: November 2010

    Creates a simple window - click it to toggle whether a translucent black "dimmer" window 
    is shown. The dimmer-window covers the entire screen, but the taskbar ("superbar" in 
    Windows 7) will jump on top of it if clicked - it seems. Simple suggestions to fix that
    are welcome.

    Should work on Windows 2000 and later. 

    Disclaimer: This is my first MFC program ever, so if anything seems wrong, it probably is.
    I have previously only coded with pure Win32 API, and hacked this together using online
    tutorials. Code provided "as-is" with no guarantees - I can not be held responsible for 
    anything bad that happens if you run this program.

***********************************************************************************************/

#include "stdafx.h"

#undef WINVER
#define WINVER 0x500 // Windows 2000 & above, because of layered windows


// - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
//
//                       Black window used to dim everything else 
//
class CDimWnd : public CFrameWnd
{               
public: 
    CDimWnd()
    {
        // Get screen res into rect
        RECT rc;
        GetDesktopWindow()->GetWindowRect(&rc);

        CreateEx(WS_EX_LAYERED |        // Layered window for translucency
                 WS_EX_TRANSPARENT |    // Click through
                 WS_EX_TOPMOST |        // Always on top
                 WS_EX_TOOLWINDOW,      // Do not appear in taskbar & similar
                 NULL, TEXT(""), 
                 WS_POPUP,              // No frame/borders - though there is 
                                        // still some border left - we'll remove 
                                        // it with regions

                 0, 0, rc.right + 10, rc.bottom + 10, // Make the window 10px larger 
                                                      // than screen resolution in both 
                                                      // directions - it is still positioned 
                                                      // at 0,0
                 NULL, NULL);

        // Grab a part of the window the size of the desktop - but 5px into it  
        // Because the window is larger than the desktop res, the borders are removed 
        CRgn rgn;                         
        rgn.CreateRectRgn(rc.left + 5, rc.top + 5, rc.right + 5, rc.bottom + 5);
        SetWindowRgn((HRGN)rgn, FALSE);
        rgn.Detach();                               

        // We have to reposition window - (0,0) of window has not changed
        SetWindowPos(NULL, -5, -5, 0, 0, SWP_NOSIZE | SWP_NOZORDER);        

        // This is where we set the opacity of the window: 0-255
        SetLayeredWindowAttributes(RGB(0,0,0), 150, LWA_ALPHA);                     
    }
    void Close()
    {
        CFrameWnd::OnClose();
    }
    BOOL CDimWnd::OnEraseBkgnd(CDC* pDC); // Set BKG color
    DECLARE_MESSAGE_MAP()
};

BOOL CDimWnd::OnEraseBkgnd(CDC* pDC)
{
    // Set brush to desired background color
    CBrush backBrush(RGB(0, 0, 0));

    // Save old brush
    CBrush* pOldBrush = pDC->SelectObject(&backBrush);

    CRect rect;
    pDC->GetClipBox(&rect);     // Erase the area needed

    pDC->PatBlt(rect.left, rect.top, rect.Width(), rect.Height(), PATCOPY);
    pDC->SelectObject(pOldBrush);   
    return TRUE;
}

BEGIN_MESSAGE_MAP(CDimWnd, CFrameWnd)
    ON_WM_ERASEBKGND()
END_MESSAGE_MAP()

// - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -


// Global variable - is screen dimmed?
bool g_bIsDimmed = false;


// The main window
class CMainWnd : public CFrameWnd
{     
    // Contains a CDimWnd - I'm not sure if this is the "MFC way" of doing things
    CDimWnd dimmer; 

public: 
    CMainWnd()
    {
        Create(NULL, TEXT("Screen dimmer - Press left mouse button on window to toggle"), 
            WS_OVERLAPPEDWINDOW, CRect(50, 50, 400, 250));
    }
    // Left mouse button toggles dimming
    afx_msg void OnLButtonDown(UINT Flags, CPoint Point)
    {
        if(!g_bIsDimmed)
        {
            dimmer.ShowWindow(SW_SHOW);
            dimmer.BringWindowToTop();          
            g_bIsDimmed = true;
        }
        else
        {           
            dimmer.ShowWindow(SW_HIDE);     
            g_bIsDimmed = false;
        }
    }
    DECLARE_MESSAGE_MAP()
};

BEGIN_MESSAGE_MAP(CMainWnd, CFrameWnd)
    ON_WM_LBUTTONDOWN()
END_MESSAGE_MAP()


// The app
class CApp : public CWinApp
{
public:         
    virtual BOOL InitInstance();
};

BOOL CApp::InitInstance()
{               
    m_pMainWnd = new CMainWnd();              
    m_pMainWnd->ShowWindow(m_nCmdShow);           
    m_pMainWnd->UpdateWindow();        
    return TRUE;
}

CApp HelloApp;

UPDATE:

I hacked together some more code for you, to handle the fading. I'm still no MFC dev, and I left the code in a "rough" state (little error handling, not very robust) to give you something to do too. :) Anyway, here's one way to do it, that I think is fairly clean:

To use it, make your main window contain a dimmer window

class CMainFrm : public CFrameWnd
{     
    CDimWnd* dimmer; 

public: 
    CMainFrm()
    {
        // constructor code here ...
        dimmer = new CDimWnd();         
    }

// rest of class ...

};  

It can then be used e.g. like this:

dimmer->Show();
MessageBox(TEXT("Hello world"));
dimmer->Hide();

Alternatively I guess you could put this code (Show()/Hide() calls) in the constructor and destructor of the modal dialog, if you want to keep the code there. If you want a "scope"-dim, like in the example you posted, this code would have to go in the constructor & destructor of the CDimWnd class, and you would need something like a static member variable to ensure that only one dimmer is running at a time (unless you want to use a global variable).

For the dimmer window - I did this:

CDimWnd.h

#define TARGET_OPACITY 70   // Target opacity 0-255 for dimmed window
#define FADE_TIME 20        // Time between each fade step in milliseconds
#define FADE_STEP 5      // How much to add to/remove from opacity each fade step
#define ID_FADE_TIMER 1

// Call Show() and Hide() to fade in/fade out dimmer. 
// Creates the dimmer window in constructor.
class CDimWnd : public CFrameWnd
{         
    bool m_isDimming;       

public: 
    CDimWnd();
    void Show();
    void Hide();            

protected:
    BOOL OnEraseBkgnd(CDC* pDC);
    void OnTimer(UINT_PTR nIDEvent);
    DECLARE_MESSAGE_MAP()
};

CDimWnd.cpp

#include "stdafx.h"
#include "CDimWnd.h"
#include "MainFrm.h"

BEGIN_MESSAGE_MAP(CDimWnd, CFrameWnd)
    ON_WM_ERASEBKGND()
END_MESSAGE_MAP()

CDimWnd::CDimWnd()
{
    // Get the main frame of the application which we want to dim.
    CMainFrame* pParent = theApp.pMainFrame;

    // Don't do anything if the main frame doesn't appear to be there
    if (pParent != NULL)
    {
        // Get the client area of the window to dim.
        CRect rc;
        pParent->GetClientRect(&rc);
        pParent->ClientToScreen(&rc);       // convert to screen coordinates

        // Do some fudging to fit the client area exactly.
        // Other applications may not need this if the above client area fits already.
        rc.top += GetSystemMetrics(SM_CYFRAME);
        rc.top += GetSystemMetrics(SM_CYCAPTION);           // MFC feature pack seems to include caption in client area
        rc.left -= GetSystemMetrics(SM_CXBORDER);
        rc.right += GetSystemMetrics(SM_CXBORDER) + 1;
        rc.bottom += GetSystemMetrics(SM_CYBORDER) + 1;

        // Create a layered window for transparency, with no caption/border.
        CreateEx(WS_EX_LAYERED | WS_EX_TRANSPARENT | WS_EX_TOOLWINDOW, NULL, TEXT(""), 
            WS_POPUP, rc.left, rc.top, rc.Width(), rc.Height(),
            pParent->GetSafeHwnd(), NULL);
    }
}


void CDimWnd::Show()
{
    // If we are not already dimming, go for it
    if(!m_isDimming)
    {
        // Bring in front of main window.
        BringWindowToTop();

        // Set opacity to 0
        SetLayeredWindowAttributes(RGB(0,0,0), 0, LWA_ALPHA);

        // Show the dimmer window
        ShowWindow(SW_SHOW);

        // Create timer - the rest is handled in OnTimer() function
        SetTimer(ID_FADE_TIMER, FADE_TIME, NULL);
    }
}


void CDimWnd::Hide()
{   
    // If we are dimming, go for it
    if(m_isDimming)
    {
        // Create timer - the rest is handled in OnTimer() function
        SetTimer(ID_FADE_TIMER, FADE_TIME, NULL);
    }
}


void CDimWnd::OnTimer(UINT_PTR nIDEvent)
{
    static int fade = 0;

    if(nIDEvent == ID_FADE_TIMER)
    {
        // We are dimming => we want to fade out
        if(m_isDimming)
        {
            if(fade < 0)
            {
                // Fading finished - hide window completely, update status & destroy timer
                fade = 0;
                ShowWindow(SW_HIDE);
                KillTimer(nIDEvent);
                m_isDimming = false;
            }
            else
            {
                // Set window opacity & update fade counter
                SetLayeredWindowAttributes(RGB(0,0,0), fade, LWA_ALPHA);
                fade -= FADE_STEP;
            }
        }
        else
        // fade in
        {
            if(fade > TARGET_OPACITY)
            {   
                // Fading finished - destroy timer & update status

                fade = TARGET_OPACITY; // but first, let's be accurate.
                SetLayeredWindowAttributes(RGB(0,0,0), fade, LWA_ALPHA);

                KillTimer(nIDEvent);
                m_isDimming = true;             
            }   
            else
            {
                // Set window opacity & update fade counter
                SetLayeredWindowAttributes(RGB(0,0,0), fade, LWA_ALPHA);
                fade += FADE_STEP;
            }
        }
    }
}


BOOL CDimWnd::OnEraseBkgnd(CDC* pDC)
{
    // Fill with black
    CBrush backBrush(RGB(0, 0, 0));
    CBrush* pOldBrush = pDC->SelectObject(&backBrush);

    CRect rect;
    pDC->GetClipBox(&rect);     // Erase the area needed
    pDC->PatBlt(rect.left, rect.top, rect.Width(), rect.Height(), PATCOPY);

    pDC->SelectObject(pOldBrush);   
    return TRUE;
}

Okay. As I said, this was thrown together fairly quickly and is in a rough state, but it should give you some code to work from, and a general idea of how (I think) timers are used in MFC. I am definitely not the right person to think anything about that, though :)

share|improve this answer
    
I usually use the Windows API directly - It shows ;) In MFC, window creation doesn't go into the constructor but is separate. Anyway, +1 jsut for coughing up a sample. –  peterchen Nov 3 '10 at 8:25
    
It's actually useful to put the initialisation in the constructor for this specific case - then you have a 'scoped window dimmer' that only requires a single line declaring a CDimWnd to dim over a scope. –  AshleysBrain Nov 3 '10 at 14:57

I couldn't resist doing it.

It's your code with added timers and implemented a fade in / fade out. Also I changed to use mid grey rather than black for the obscuring block.

You can tweak the constants that control the fade to make it smoother by increasing the duration or the increasing the rate. Experiment shows me that a rate of 10hz is smooth for me, but YMMV

// DimWnd.h : header file
#pragma once

class CDimWnd : public CFrameWnd
{
public:
    CDimWnd(class CWnd * pParent);
    virtual ~CDimWnd();
    BOOL OnEraseBkgnd(CDC* pDC);
    int opacity, opacity_increment;
protected:
    DECLARE_MESSAGE_MAP()

public:
    afx_msg void OnTimer(UINT_PTR nIDEvent);
    void fadeOut();
};

// DimWnd.cpp : implementation file
//

#include "stdafx.h"
#include "dimmer.h"
#include "DimWnd.h"
#include "MainFrm.h"
#include <math.h>

const int TIMER_ID = 111;

// For preventing two dimmer windows ever appearing
bool is_dimmer_active = false;

// constants to control the fade.
int    ticks_per_second  = 1000; // ms
int    start_opacity     = 44;   // 20%
int    max_opacity       = 220;  // 0->255
double fade_in_duration  = 4;    // seconds to fade in  (appear)
double fade_out_duration = 0.2;    // seconds to fade out (disappear)
int    rate              = 100;  // Timer rate (ms


CDimWnd::CDimWnd(CWnd * pParent)
{
    // Don't do anything if the main frame doesn't appear to be there,
    // or if there is already dimming happening.
    if (pParent != NULL && !is_dimmer_active)
    {
        // Get the client area of the window to dim.
        CRect rc;
        pParent->GetClientRect(&rc);
        pParent->ClientToScreen(&rc);       // convert to screen coordinates

        // Do some fudging to fit the client area exactly.
        // Other applications may not need this if the above client area fits already.
        rc.top += GetSystemMetrics(SM_CYFRAME);
        rc.top += GetSystemMetrics(SM_CYCAPTION);           // MFC feature pack seems to include caption in client area
        rc.left -= GetSystemMetrics(SM_CXBORDER);
        rc.right += GetSystemMetrics(SM_CXBORDER) + 1;
        rc.bottom += GetSystemMetrics(SM_CYBORDER) + 1;

        // Create a layered window for transparency, with no caption/border.
        CreateEx(WS_EX_LAYERED | WS_EX_TRANSPARENT | WS_EX_TOOLWINDOW, NULL, TEXT(""), 
            WS_POPUP, rc.left, rc.top, rc.Width(), rc.Height(),
            pParent->GetSafeHwnd(), NULL);

        // Bring in front of main window.
        BringWindowToTop();

        // Show the dimmer window
        ShowWindow(SW_SHOW);


        double increment_per_second = ((max_opacity - start_opacity) / fade_in_duration);
        opacity_increment = ceil(  increment_per_second / (ticks_per_second / rate) ) ;

        is_dimmer_active = true;
        opacity = start_opacity;

        SetLayeredWindowAttributes(RGB(0,0,0), opacity, LWA_ALPHA);

        SetTimer(TIMER_ID, rate,NULL);  

    }
}

CDimWnd::~CDimWnd()
{
    fadeOut(); // fade the window out rather than just disappearing.
    is_dimmer_active = false;
}

void CDimWnd::fadeOut()
{
    // can't use timers as may be in the process of being destroyed so make it quick..

    double increment_per_second = ((opacity - start_opacity) / fade_out_duration);
    opacity_increment = ceil(  increment_per_second / (ticks_per_second / rate) ) ;

    while(opacity  > start_opacity)
    {
        opacity -= opacity_increment;
        SetLayeredWindowAttributes(RGB(0,0,0), opacity, LWA_ALPHA);
        Sleep(100);
    }
}

BOOL CDimWnd::OnEraseBkgnd(CDC* pDC)
{
    // Fill with midgray
    CBrush backBrush(RGB(128,128,128));
    CBrush* pOldBrush = pDC->SelectObject(&backBrush);

    CRect rect;
    pDC->GetClipBox(&rect);     // Erase the area needed
    pDC->PatBlt(rect.left, rect.top, rect.Width(), rect.Height(), PATCOPY);

    pDC->SelectObject(pOldBrush);   
    return TRUE;
}

BEGIN_MESSAGE_MAP(CDimWnd, CFrameWnd)
    ON_WM_ERASEBKGND()
    ON_WM_TIMER()
END_MESSAGE_MAP()

void CDimWnd::OnTimer(UINT_PTR nIDEvent)
{
    if (opacity >= max_opacity) 
    {
        // stop the timer when fade in finished.
        KillTimer(TIMER_ID);
        return;
    }

    opacity += opacity_increment;
    SetLayeredWindowAttributes(RGB(0,0,0), opacity, LWA_ALPHA);

    CFrameWnd::OnTimer(nIDEvent);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Seems to be a clean way to do it as long as you only need the scope model, and don't need a long fade out. It's simpler than my version, for sure :) –  Oystein Nov 6 '10 at 5:18

I've accepted oystein's answer, since it led me to the solution, but I thought I'd post my modifications. I had to modify it a bit to make it work for me, so it might come in useful to someone else.

For the record, the dimming works well, but it doesn't look as natural as I hoped. In an application which frequently brings up dialogs, the dimming becomes distracting in its regularity of seemingly switching the main window on and off. To compromise, I've made the dimming fairly subtle (about 25% opacity) which gently highlights the active dialog; the instant dimming is still a little distracting, but I'm not sure how to have it fade in or fade out smoothly, especially when scoped.

Also, I'm not a UI expert, but the dimming gave me a sort of impression that the dialog was less related to the window content behind it. This made it feel a bit detached from what I was working on in the application, even though the dialogs are directly manipulating that content. This might be another distraction.

Here it is anyway:

CDimWnd.h

// Dim the application main window over a scope.  Creates dimmer window in constructor.
class CDimWnd : public CFrameWnd
{               
public: 
    CDimWnd();
    BOOL OnEraseBkgnd(CDC* pDC);

    ~CDimWnd();

protected:
    DECLARE_MESSAGE_MAP()
};

CDimWnd.cpp

#include "stdafx.h"
#include "CDimWnd.h"
#include "MainFrm.h"

BEGIN_MESSAGE_MAP(CDimWnd, CFrameWnd)
    ON_WM_ERASEBKGND()
END_MESSAGE_MAP()

// For preventing two dimmer windows ever appearing
bool is_dimmer_active = false;

CDimWnd::CDimWnd()
{
    // Get the main frame of the application which we want to dim.
    CMainFrame* pParent = theApp.pMainFrame;

    // Don't do anything if the main frame doesn't appear to be there,
    // or if there is already dimming happening.
    if (pParent != NULL && !is_dimmer_active)
    {
        // Get the client area of the window to dim.
        CRect rc;
        pParent->GetClientRect(&rc);
        pParent->ClientToScreen(&rc);       // convert to screen coordinates

        // Do some fudging to fit the client area exactly.
        // Other applications may not need this if the above client area fits already.
        rc.top += GetSystemMetrics(SM_CYFRAME);
        rc.top += GetSystemMetrics(SM_CYCAPTION);           // MFC feature pack seems to include caption in client area
        rc.left -= GetSystemMetrics(SM_CXBORDER);
        rc.right += GetSystemMetrics(SM_CXBORDER) + 1;
        rc.bottom += GetSystemMetrics(SM_CYBORDER) + 1;

        // Create a layered window for transparency, with no caption/border.
        CreateEx(WS_EX_LAYERED | WS_EX_TRANSPARENT | WS_EX_TOOLWINDOW, NULL, TEXT(""), 
            WS_POPUP, rc.left, rc.top, rc.Width(), rc.Height(),
            pParent->GetSafeHwnd(), NULL);

        // Bring in front of main window.
        BringWindowToTop();

        // Apply 25% opacity
        SetLayeredWindowAttributes(RGB(0,0,0), 64, LWA_ALPHA);

        // Show the dimmer window
        ShowWindow(SW_SHOW);

        is_dimmer_active = true;
    }
}

CDimWnd::~CDimWnd()
{
    is_dimmer_active = false;
}

BOOL CDimWnd::OnEraseBkgnd(CDC* pDC)
{
    // Fill with black
    CBrush backBrush(RGB(0, 0, 0));
    CBrush* pOldBrush = pDC->SelectObject(&backBrush);

    CRect rect;
    pDC->GetClipBox(&rect);     // Erase the area needed
    pDC->PatBlt(rect.left, rect.top, rect.Width(), rect.Height(), PATCOPY);

    pDC->SelectObject(pOldBrush);   
    return TRUE;
}

Usage is dead simple: because CDimWnd creates itself in its constructor, all you need to do is add CDimWnd dimmer as a member of the dialog class, and it automatically dims the main window, no matter where you call the dialog from.

You can also use it within a scope to dim system modal dialogs:

{
    CDimWnd dimmer;
    MessageBox(...);
}
share|improve this answer
    
For fading, you can make a timer in the constructor/destructor that gradually increases/decreases opacity. Unless you want a separate thread doing this, the fade would have to be pretty fast. –  Oystein Nov 3 '10 at 17:11
    
That's the thing, the fade shouldn't delay the appearance of the dialog. Is it possible to have it happen the same time as the modal dialog appears with its Aero fade-in transition? Will a timer still run if a modal dialog is going? –  AshleysBrain Nov 3 '10 at 19:32
    
Discard last comment. If you register a windows timer, you'll receive a tick event. If you do the fading in the event handler, it will fade independent of other dialogs and won't delay execution of anything. –  Oystein Nov 3 '10 at 19:46
    
More on timers: here, here, here, and here –  Oystein Nov 3 '10 at 20:09
    
I updated my answer with an example, in case you could find that useful –  Oystein Nov 3 '10 at 23:14

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