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Suppose I construct a RAII object, and that object may fail to construct. How do I handle this?

try {
    std::vector<int> v(LOTS);
    // try scope ends here because that's what the catch is for
} catch( const std::bad_alloc& ) {
    // ...
}
// v? what v?

Granted, the default constructor of std::vector won't throw and that can help, but this is not the general case. A constructor may very well throw. If I want to handle any resource acquisition failure, how do I do that while still being able to proceed if it doesn't throw?

Edit: To clarify, my issue is that if a resource fails to acquire then I might want to try again, and so on. Maybe I can try acquiring an alternative resource.

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1  
Not exactly sure what is the question. The code that uses v must be in try block. –  Dialecticus Oct 31 '10 at 15:14
2  
As I understand the question, the issue is that in order to be able to recover from an exception in v's constructor, v has to be declared inside the try scope, which means it can no longer be visible after the catch block. So if you have code that on one hand needs to be able to "ignore" an exception when constructing v, and on the other hand, be able to use v if construction succeeded, it gets a bit tricky –  jalf Oct 31 '10 at 15:17
    
If a resource fails to acquire then maybe I can do with another resource instead, rather than letting the exception propagate. And if that second resource fails then maybe I have another idea, and so on. I feel like this leads to a mess in code no matter what approach I take. RAII just describes how to clean up in the case of failure, not how to resolve the failure. –  wilhelmtell Oct 31 '10 at 16:39

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Depends what you mean by "proceed". Whatever operation requires the resource will fail: that's what "requires" means. So when you want to continue after an error, you might end up writing code like this:

void something_using_RAII(thingummy &t) {
    vector<int> v(t.size_required);
    // do something using v
}

...

for each thingummy {
    try {
         something_using_RAII(this_thingummy);
    } catch(const std::bad_alloc &) {
         std::cerr << "can't manage that one, sorry\n";
    }
}

That's why you should only catch exceptions when there's something worthwhile you can do with them (in this case, report failure and move on to the next thingummy).

If you want to try again on failure, but only if the constructor fails, not if anything else fails:

while(not bored of trying) {
    bool constructor_failed = true;
    try {
        vector<int> v(LOTS);
        constructor_failed = false;
        // use v
    } catch(...) {
        if (!constructor_failed) throw;
    }
}

This is more-or-less how std::new_handler works - the handler is called in the catch clause of a similar loop, although with no need for a flag.

If you want to try a different resource on failure:

try {
    vector<int> v(LOTS);
    // use v
} catch(...) try {
    otherthing<int> w(LOTS);
    // use w
} catch(...) {
    // failed
}

If "use v" and "use w" are basically the same code, then refactor into a function and call it from both places. Your function is doing quite a lot at this point.

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2  
+1 alone for that last sentence. Not enough programmers pay attention to that. Very unfortunately. –  sbi Oct 31 '10 at 19:20

All code that uses v needs to be in the try block. If the question is how to then narrow down the code which threw the exception, you can use some kind of flag to indicate where in the try block you are, like this:

string flag;
try
{
    flag = "creating vector<int> v";
    std::vector<int> v(LOTS);

    flag = "performing blaggity bloop";
    blaggity_bloop();

    flag = "doing some other stuff";
    some_other_stuff();
}
catch( const std::bad_alloc& )
{
    cerr << "Bad allocation while " << flag << endl;
}
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If v can't be created, all the code that tries to use v can't be executed. Move the catch after the code that code uses v, in a place where it is reasonable to continue execution if there is no v.

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2  
The problem, as I understand it, is that then you can't distinguish in the catch from an exception thrown by v's ctor or by the other code in the try block. –  Roger Pate Oct 31 '10 at 15:29
    
@Roger: in which case (barring litb's solution, which is fine but relies on swap, which not all RAII classes have) you have to write something annoying like try { vector<int> v(LOTS); bool flag = true; try { use v; flag = false; } catch (...) { X } } catch(...) { Y }. X handles exceptions from the other code in the try block, Y handles exceptions from the constructor or destructor of v, and from X. But the destructor of v shouldn't throw, and exceptions from X can be recognised by the flag. –  Steve Jessop Oct 31 '10 at 17:03

If an RAII constructor throws, all resources bound to RAII objects prior to the throwing point will be cleaned up properly. The C++ rules are sensibly designed to guarantee that.

If your v construction throws because of a bad_alloc then any RAII object created prior to v in the try block will be properly cleaned up.

So if you consequently use RAII, you don't need a manual try / catch like that, because the RAII objects handle cleanup for you. If you do need it for some reason, in the case above you could use swap like the following.

std::vector<int> v;
try {
    std::vector<int> vtry(LOTS);
    v.swap(vtry); // no-throw
} catch( const std::bad_alloc& ) {
    // ...
}
// v!
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1  
This isn't about cleaning up. It's about doing something when the RAII object fails to initialize. If I do nothing then the exception propagates. No good. What if my function must provide a no-throw guarantee? What if the RAII object doesn't have a constructor that won't throw? –  wilhelmtell Oct 31 '10 at 15:46
    
You may well say that an object that has no constructor that doesn't throw is badly designed. That's fine. I just never saw this recommendation anywhere, so if that's true I want to bring it to the surface. Otherwise, hear how you handle the situation when any ctor can throw. –  wilhelmtell Oct 31 '10 at 15:48
    
@wilhelmtell, "What if the RAII object doesn't have a constructor that won't throw?" -> I think you need to put the entire code within the try clause then. I don't think that it is bad design to not have a no-throw constructor. Sometimes it may not fit well. But I find it useful if such a no-throw state exists. You can also wrap your object into a smart-pointer that has a nothrow default state (like shared_ptr). But I think that would be disgusting. Try blocks have zero-execution-cost in C++, if done properly with tables. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Oct 31 '10 at 16:08

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