Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Assuming Stack Overflow domain problem and the following definition of events:

UserRegistered(UserId, Name, Email)
UserNameChanged(UserId, Name)
QuestionAsked(UserId, QuestionId, Title, Question)

Assuming the following state of event store (in the order of appearance):

1) UserRegistered(1, "John", "john@gmail.com")
2) UserNameChanged(1, "SuperJohn")
3) UserNameChanged(1, "John007")
4) QuestionAsked(1, 1, "Help!", "Please!")

Assuming the following denormalized read model for questions listing (for the first page of SO):

QuestionItem(UserId, QuestionId, QuestionTitle, Question, UserName)

And the following event handler (which builds denormalized read model):

public class QuestionEventsHandler
{
    public void Handle(QuestionAsked question)
    {
        var item = new QuestionItem(
            question.UserId, 
            question.QuestionId, 
            question.Title, 
            question.Question, 
            ??? /* how should i get name of the user? */);
        ...
    }
}

My question is how can i find the name of the user who asked a question? Or more common: how should i handle events if my denormalized read model requires additional data which is not exists in the particular event?

I've examined existing samples of CQRS including SimpleSQRS of Greg Young and Fohjin sample of Mark Nijhof. But it seems to me that they are operate only with data that is included in events.

share|improve this question
    
More discussion at: groups.google.com/group/dddcqrs/browse_thread/thread/… –  Brian Low Jun 16 '11 at 19:02

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Just enrich the event with all the necessary information.

Greg's approach, as I recall, - enrich the event while creating and store/publish it this way.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Rinat! I will go with your suggestion, but do you really agree that this is a good solution to enrich domain events with data that is needed only for read model? –  Dmitry Schetnikovich Nov 4 '10 at 19:18
1  
Yes. There are no big drawbacks that I can see. Besides, storage is cheap these days and enriched domain events help to analyze your system later as well. For example, I often put a lot of performance stats in operations that stress IO or CPU; this info is not even used in read models. But I need to optimize performance I can query domain log with LINQ for the history of operations and exact performance details. –  Rinat Abdullin Nov 5 '10 at 10:30
    
One drawback would be that you aren't necessarily in a position to change the event producer. Another that the event will become bloated with incoherent data as time goes by and more and more event handlers wanting their specific piece of information gets added to the system. Whats the drawbacks of letting the event handler query the read model for the extra information? –  Sebastian Ganslandt Jun 19 '11 at 13:58
3  
This answer suggests that all data needed should be in the event. I disagree with this as a rule of thumb. Event handlers will be creating a de-normalised record, often containing aggregated & calculated fields that aren't necessarily sourced from a single aggregate. Perhaps a 'NumberOfQuestionsByMonth' view model as an example. This is the point of CQRS; it does these calculations when something is persisted, rather than when queried. To do these calculations you often need to query and process the data. This data is outside of the scope of the aggregate, and cannot be passed in the event. –  David Masters Feb 6 '12 at 15:06
1  
This seems like a messy solution. If you want to join two aggregates, then listen to events from both, or project into a read model which can do the joins for you. –  Sebastian Good May 15 '12 at 2:49

Personally I think there's nothing wrong with looking up the user's name from within the event handler. But if you're in a position where you can't query the name from the User's read model then I'd introduce an additional event handler to QuestionEventsHandler, to handle the UserRegistered event.

That way the QuestionEventsHandler could maintain its own repository of user names (you wouldn't need to store the users email). The QuestionAsked handler can then query the user's name direct from it's own repository (as Rinat Abdullin said storage is cheap!).

Besides since your QuestionItem read model holds the user's name, you would need to handle the UserNameChanged event within the QuestionEventsHandler as well to ensure the name field within the QuestionItem is up-to-date.

To me this seems less effort than 'enriching the events' and has the benefit of not building dependencies on other parts of the system and their read models.

share|improve this answer

Pull events from the EventStore.

Remember - Your read models need to have read-only access to the EventStore already. Read Models are disposable. They are simply cached views. You should be able to delete / expire your Read Models at any time - and automatically rebuild your ReadModels from the EventStore. So - your ReadModelBuilders must already be able to query for past events.

public class QuestionEventsHandler
{
    public void Handle(QuestionAsked question)
    {
        // Get Name of User
        var nameChangedEvent = eventRepository.GetLastEventByAggregateId<UserNameChanged>(question.UserId);

        var item = new QuestionItem(
            question.UserId, 
            question.QuestionId, 
            question.Title, 
            question.Question, 

            nameChangedEvent.Name
    }
}

Also realize - the EventStore repository need not be the true EventStore, although it certainly could be. The advantage of distributed systems is that you can easily replicate the EventStore, if you needed, closer to your ReadModels.

I encountered this exact same scenario... where I needed more data than was available in a single event. This is especially true for Create-type events which require populating a new ReadModel with initial state.

From Read Models: You could pull from other Read Models. But I really don't recommend this, as you would introduce a big ball of dependency mud where views depend on views depend on views.

Additional Data in Events: You really don't want to bloat your events with all the extra data you'll need for views. It will really hurt you when your domain changes & you need to migrate events. Domain Events have specific purposes - they represent state changes. Not view data.

Hope this helps -

Ryan

share|improve this answer
1  
This assumes you have access to the event repository, in my mind the handlers should only received events rather than pull events. Would this work in a highly distributed system? –  Chris Moutray Feb 6 '12 at 14:09
    
"Your read models need to have read-only access to the EventStore". That's news to me. I see no reason why the read side needs to have access to the event store. It simply needs to be alerted when an event occurs. I personally don't have a problem with querying out the username from the read side, given the handler exists on the read side anyway. –  David Masters Feb 6 '12 at 14:45
    
In our current project we will most likely have read access to the event store, because a stream of events related to a particular aggregate is to be displayed in the UI, facebook timeline style. Yes, we could use a projection and generate that (and perhaps we will if this needs some denormalization), but for now we're finding querying the most straight-forward way. –  Dav Aug 2 '12 at 6:16

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.