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How do you do it? Given a byte array:

byte[] foo = new byte[4096];

How would I get the first x bytes of the array as a separate array? (Specifically, I need it as an IEnumerable<byte>)

This is for working with Sockets. I figure the easiest way would be array slicing, similar to Perls syntax:

@bar = @foo[0..40];

Which would return the first 41 elements into the @bar array. Is there something in C# that I'm just missing, or is there some other thing I should be doing?

LINQ is an option for me (.NET 3.5), if that helps any.

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15 Answers 15

up vote 95 down vote accepted

Arrays are enumerable, so your foo already is an IEnumerable<byte> itself. Simply use LINQ sequence methods like Take() to get what you want out of it (don't forget to include the Linq namespace with Using System.Linq):

byte[] foo = new byte[4096];

var bar = foo.Take(41);

If you really need an array from any IEnumerable<byte> value, you could use the ToArray() method for that. Here that does not seem to be the case.

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3  
If we are going to copy to another array just use the Array.Copy static method. However I think the other answers have interpreted the intent correctly, another array is not required just an IEnumberable<byte> that over the first 41 bytes. –  AnthonyWJones Jan 2 '09 at 11:09
2  
Note that only single dimensional and jagged arrays are enumerable, multi dimensional arrays are not. –  Abel Apr 8 '10 at 9:11
4  
Note using Array.Copy performs a lot faster than using LINQ's Take or Skip methods. –  Michael Jun 23 '11 at 4:35
1  
@Abel That is actually very incorrect. Multi dimensional arrays are enumerable but they enumerate like this: [2,3] => [1,1], [1,2], [1,3], [2,1], [2,2], [2,3]. Jagged arrays are also enumerable but instead of returning a value when enumerated, they return their inner array. Like this: type[][] jaggedArray; foreach (type[] innerArray in jaggedArray) { } –  Aidiakapi Feb 9 '12 at 18:49
1  
@Aidiakapi "very incorect"? ;). But you're partially right, I should have writte "multidim arrays do not implement IEnumerable<T>", then my statement would've been clearer. See also this: stackoverflow.com/questions/721882/… –  Abel Feb 10 '12 at 10:00

You could use ArraySegment<T>. It's very light-weight as it doesn't copy the array:

string[] a = { "one", "two", "three", "four", "five" };
var segment = new ArraySegment<string>( a, 1, 2 );
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2  
Unfortunately it's not IEnumerable. –  recursive Jul 19 '10 at 17:00
8  
+1 I didn't even know that type existed! –  ShdNx Oct 21 '10 at 14:33
14  
Does anyone know WHY it's not IEnumerable? I don't. It seems like it should be. –  Fantius Dec 29 '10 at 22:08
11  
ArraySegment is IList and IEnumerable starting from .Net 4.5. Too bad for older version users.. –  Yuxiu Li Dec 13 '12 at 21:31
3  
@Zyo I meant ArraySegment<T> implements IEnumerable<T> starting from .Net 4.5, not IEnumerable<T> itself is new. –  Yuxiu Li Mar 23 '13 at 0:36

You could use the arrays CopyTo() method...

EDIT: Or with LINQ you can use Skip() and Take()...

EDIT2: Usage of LINQ Skip and Take:

byte[] arr = {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8};
var subset = arr.Skip(2).Take(2);
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for a good idea, but I need to use the returned array as input for another function, which makes CopyTo require a temporary variable. I'll wait for other answers yet. –  Matthew Scharley Jan 2 '09 at 10:53
    
I'm not familiar with LINQ yet, perhaps this is further evidence that I really should be. –  Matthew Scharley Jan 2 '09 at 10:55
4  
this approach is at least 50x slower than Array.Copy. This isn't an issue in many situations but when doing array slicing in a cycle, the performance drop is very obvious. –  Valentin Vasilyev Mar 4 '10 at 8:48
1  
I'm making a single call, so performance is not an issue for me. This is great for readability...thanks. –  Rich May 24 '12 at 18:46
static byte[] SliceMe(byte[] source, int length)
{
    byte[] destfoo = new byte[length];
    Array.Copy(source, 0, destfoo, 0, length);
    return destfoo;
}

//

var myslice = SliceMe(sourcearray,41);
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2  
I think Buffer.BlockCopy() is more efficient and achieves the same results. –  Matt Davis Feb 15 '12 at 16:16

If you want IEnumerable<byte>, then just

IEnumerable<byte> data = foo.Take(x);
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Another possibility I haven't seen mentioned here: Buffer.BlockCopy() is slightly faster than Array.Copy(), and it has the added benefit of being able to convert on-the-fly from an array of primitives (say, short[]) to an array of bytes, which can be handy when you've got numeric arrays that you need to transmit over Sockets.

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1  
Buffer.BlockCopy produced different results than Array.Copy() even though they accept the same parameters - there were a lot of empty elements. Why? –  jocull Aug 8 '12 at 6:39
2  
@jocull - They don't actually quite take the same parameters. Array.Copy() takes its length and position parameters in elements. Buffer.BlockCopy() takes its length and position parameters in bytes. In other words, if you wanted to copy a 10-element array of integers, you would use Array.Copy(array1, 0, array2, 0, 10), but Buffer.BlockCopy(array1, 0, array2, 0, 10 * sizeof(int)). –  Ken Smith Aug 8 '12 at 15:27
    
Oh, wow. That is so confusing for the user. Thanks for the clarification. –  jocull Aug 8 '12 at 18:02

You could use a wrapper around the original array (which is IList), like in this (untested) piece of code.

public class SubList<T> : IList<T>
{
    #region Fields

private readonly int startIndex;
private readonly int endIndex;
private readonly int count;
private readonly IList<T> source;

#endregion

public SubList(IList<T> source, int startIndex, int count)
{
    this.source = source;
    this.startIndex = startIndex;
    this.count = count;
    this.endIndex = this.startIndex + this.count - 1;
}

#region IList<T> Members

public int IndexOf(T item)
{
    if (item != null)
    {
        for (int i = this.startIndex; i <= this.endIndex; i++)
        {
            if (item.Equals(this.source[i]))
                return i;
        }
    }
    else
    {
        for (int i = this.startIndex; i <= this.endIndex; i++)
        {
            if (this.source[i] == null)
                return i;
        }
    }
    return -1;
}

public void Insert(int index, T item)
{
    throw new NotSupportedException();
}

public void RemoveAt(int index)
{
    throw new NotSupportedException();
}

public T this[int index]
{
    get
    {
        if (index >= 0 && index < this.count)
            return this.source[index + this.startIndex];
        else
            throw new IndexOutOfRangeException("index");
    }
    set
    {
        if (index >= 0 && index < this.count)
            this.source[index + this.startIndex] = value;
        else
            throw new IndexOutOfRangeException("index");
    }
}

#endregion

#region ICollection<T> Members

public void Add(T item)
{
    throw new NotSupportedException();
}

public void Clear()
{
    throw new NotSupportedException();
}

public bool Contains(T item)
{
    return this.IndexOf(item) >= 0;
}

public void CopyTo(T[] array, int arrayIndex)
{
    for (int i=0; i<this.count; i++)
    {
        array[arrayIndex + i] = this.source[i + this.startIndex];
    }
}

public int Count
{
    get { return this.count; }
}

public bool IsReadOnly
{
    get { return true; }
}

public bool Remove(T item)
{
    throw new NotSupportedException();
}

#endregion

#region IEnumerable<T> Members

public IEnumerator<T> GetEnumerator()
{
    for (int i = this.startIndex; i < this.endIndex; i++)
    {
        yield return this.source[i];
    }
}

#endregion

#region IEnumerable Members

IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
{
    return GetEnumerator();
}

#endregion

}

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3  
I'd suggest using EqualityComparer.Default for IndexOf - that way you don't need any special casing. –  Jon Skeet Jan 2 '09 at 11:50
    
How's the performance of EqualityComparer.Default? –  Rauhotz Jan 2 '09 at 11:57
1  
I'd expect it to be absolutely fine. I'd certainly go with the simpler code first. –  Jon Skeet Apr 8 '10 at 9:04
    
Something like this is in my opinion the best way to go. But obviously it's more work (the first time) than a simple Array.Copy, even though this can have many advantages, such as the SubList literally being a region within the parent List, instead of a copy of the entries in the List. –  Aidiakapi Feb 9 '12 at 18:55

Here's a simple extension method that returns a slice as a new array:

public static T[] Slice<T>(this T[] arr, uint indexFrom, uint indexTo) {
    if (indexFrom > indexTo) {
        throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("indexFrom is bigger than indexTo!");
    }

    uint length = indexTo - indexFrom;
    T[] result = new T[length];
    Array.Copy(arr, indexFrom, result, 0, length);

    return result;
}

Then you can use it as:

byte[] slice = foo.Slice(0, 40);
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byte[] foo = new byte[4096]; 

byte[] bar = foo.Take(40).ToArray();
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You can use Take extension method

var array = new byte[] {1, 2, 3, 4};
var firstTwoItems = array.Take(2);
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I do not think C# supports the Range semantics you could write an Extension method though like...

public static IEnumerator<Byte> Range(this byte[] array, int start, int end);

But like others have said if you do not need to set a start index then Take is all you need.

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This may be a solution that:

var result = foo.Slice(40, int.MaxValue);

Then the result is an IEnumerable< IEnumerable< byte>> with a first IEnumerable< byte> contains the first 40 bytes of foo, and a second IEnumerable< byte> holds the rest.

I wrote a wrapper class, the whole iteration is lazy, hope it could help:

public static class CollectionSlicer
{
    public static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> Slice<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, params int[] steps)
    {
        if (!steps.Any(step => step != 0))
        {
            throw new InvalidOperationException("Can't slice a collection with step length 0.");
        }
        return new Slicer<T>(source.GetEnumerator(), steps).Slice();
    }
}

public sealed class Slicer<T>
{
    public Slicer(IEnumerator<T> iterator, int[] steps)
    {
        _iterator = iterator;
        _steps = steps;
        _index = 0;
        _currentStep = 0;
        _isHasNext = true;
    }

    public int Index
    {
        get { return _index; }
    }

    public IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> Slice()
    {
        var length = _steps.Length;
        var index = 1;
        var step = 0;

        for (var i = 0; _isHasNext; ++i)
        {
            if (i < length)
            {
                step = _steps[i];
                _currentStep = step - 1;
            }

            while (_index < index && _isHasNext)
            {
                _isHasNext = MoveNext();
            }

            if (_isHasNext)
            {
                yield return SliceInternal();
                index += step;
            }
        }
    }

    private IEnumerable<T> SliceInternal()
    {
        if (_currentStep == -1) yield break;
        yield return _iterator.Current;

        for (var count = 0; count < _currentStep && _isHasNext; ++count)
        {
            _isHasNext = MoveNext();

            if (_isHasNext)
            {
                yield return _iterator.Current;
            }
        }
    }

    private bool MoveNext()
    {
        ++_index;
        return _iterator.MoveNext();
    }

    private readonly IEnumerator<T> _iterator;
    private readonly int[] _steps;
    private volatile bool _isHasNext;
    private volatile int _currentStep;
    private volatile int _index;
}
share|improve this answer
    
nice implementation. –  Lo Sauer Sep 28 '13 at 17:50

Here is an extension function that uses a generic and behaves like the PHP function array_slice. Negative offset and length are allowed.

public static class Extensions
{
    public static T[] Slice<T>(this T[] arr, int offset, int length)
    {
        int start, end;

        // Determine start index, handling negative offset.
        if (offset < 0)
            start = arr.Length + offset;
        else
            start = offset;

        // Clamp start index to the bounds of the input array.
        if (start < 0)
            start = 0;
        else if (start > arr.Length)
            start = arr.Length;

        // Determine end index, handling negative length.
        if (length < 0)
            end = arr.Length + length;
        else
            end = start + length;

        // Clamp end index to the bounds of the input array.
        if (end < 0)
            end = 0;
        if (end > arr.Length)
            end = arr.Length;

        // Get the array slice.
        int len = end - start;
        T[] result = new T[len];
        for (int i = 0; i < len; i++)
        {
            result[i] = arr[start + i];
        }
        return result;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Pretty good, though a few things from the .NET world. If start isn't between 0 and arr.Length, it should probably throw an out of bounds exception. Also, end >= start >= 0, so you don't need to check end < 0, it isn't possible that it will happen. You could probably do it even more succinctly by checking that length >= 0 and then len = Math.min(length, arr.Length - start) instead of the fuddling with end. –  Matthew Scharley Nov 12 at 8:14

Coming late to the party but here's a generic BlockCopy for arrays:

public static T[] BlockCopy<T>(this T[] source, int index, int length, bool padToLength = false)
{
    int n = length;
    T[] slice = null;

    if (source.Length < index + length)
    {
        n = source.Length - index;
        if (padToLength)
        {
            slice = new T[length];
        }
    }

    if(slice == null) slice = new T[n];
    Array.Copy(source, index, slice, 0, n);
    return slice;
}

public static IEnumerable<T[]> BlockCopy<T>(this T[] source, int count, bool padToLength = false)
{
    for (var i = 0; i < source.Length; i += count)
        yield return source.BlockCopy(i, count, padToLength);
}

Usage:

        string[] test = new string[101];
        for (int i = 0; i < 101; i++)
            test[i] = string.Format("String {0}", i);

        foreach(string[] block in test.BlockCopy(10, true))
        {
            foreach(string s in block)
                Console.WriteLine(s);
        }


        byte[] bytes = File.ReadAllBytes("c:\\temp\\testfile.txt");

        using (var stream = new FileStream("c:\\temp\\testfile.txt", FileMode.Append))
        {
            foreach (byte[] block in bytes.BlockCopy(14))
            {
                stream.Write(block, 0, block.Length);
            }
        }
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You can use Enumerable.Range to generate an IEnumerable that doesn't have to skip over portions of the array. Should work in .NET 3.5 or greater.

IEnumerable<byte> bar = Enumerable.Range(0, 41).Select(n => foo[n]);
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