Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I need to define new UI Elements as well as data binding in code because they will be implemented after run-time. Here is a simplified version of what I am trying to do.

Data Model:

public class AddressBook : INotifyPropertyChanged
{
    private int _houseNumber;
    public int HouseNumber
    {
        get { return _houseNumber; }
        set { _houseNumber = value; NotifyPropertyChanged("HouseNumber"); }
    }

    public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;

    protected void NotifyPropertyChanged(string sProp)
    {
        if (PropertyChanged != null)
        {
            PropertyChanged(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(sProp));
        }
    }
}

Binding in Code:

AddressBook book = new AddressBook();
book.HouseNumber = 123;
TextBlock tb = new TextBlock();
Binding bind = new Binding("HouseNumber");
bind.Source = book;
bind.Mode = BindingMode.OneWay;
tb.SetBinding(TextBlock.TextProperty, bind); // Text block displays "123"
myGrid.Children.Add(tb);
book.HouseNumber = 456; // Text block displays "123" but PropertyChanged event fires

When the data is first bound, the text block is updated with the correct house number. Then, if I change the house number in code later, the book's PropertyChanged event fires, but the text block is not updated. Can anyone tell me why?

Thanks, Ben

share|improve this question
    
Have you tried to set breakpoints to see if they get hit when you set the property? –  John Jan 2 '09 at 11:24
    
Yes, I have a message box popping up when the book's PropertyChanged event fires, which happens on every data update. –  Ben McIntosh Jan 2 '09 at 11:32
    
The most interesting answer, IMO, is by @StevenRobbins , though it is undervoted and thereafter buried inside other answers –  Gennady Vanin Novosibirsk Apr 19 '13 at 8:04
add comment

6 Answers 6

up vote 10 down vote accepted

The root of it was that the string I passed to PropertyChangedEventArgs did not EXACTLY match the name of the property. I had something like this:

public int HouseNumber
{
    get { return _houseNumber; }
    set { _houseNumber = value; NotifyPropertyChanged("HouseNum"); }
}

Where it should be this:

public int HouseNumber
{
    get { return _houseNumber; }
    set { _houseNumber = value; NotifyPropertyChanged("HouseNumber"); }
}

Yikes! Thanks for the push in the right direction.

share|improve this answer
    
Aha.. I've done the same myself when I've renamed a property :) The code you pasted in was correct though? –  Steven Robbins Jan 2 '09 at 12:06
    
I changed the actual property names I was using the protect the innocent :) –  Ben McIntosh Jan 2 '09 at 12:08
    
I was just about to suggest this as a common problem. INotifyPropertyChanged is so fragile. I wish we weren't forced to used such crud. –  Daniel Paull Jan 3 '09 at 6:27
    
Take a look at the MVVM Sample (msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/dd419663.aspx). It has a implementation for INotifyPropertyChanged that uses Reflection to make sure the name passed matches a property. It helps. –  Bruno Brant Dec 18 '10 at 19:01
add comment

Make sure you're updating the AddressBook reference that was used in the binding, and not some other AddressBook reference.

I got the following to work with the AddressBook code you gave.

<StackPanel>
    <Button Click="Button_Click">Random</Button>
    <Grid x:Name="myGrid">
    </Grid>
</StackPanel>

Code behind:

public partial class Window1 : Window
{
    private AddressBook book;

    public Window1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();

        book = new AddressBook();
        book.HouseNumber = 13;

        TextBlock tb = new TextBlock();
        Binding bind = new Binding("HouseNumber");
        bind.Source = book;
        tb.SetBinding(TextBlock.TextProperty, bind);
        myGrid.Children.Add(tb);
    }

    private void Button_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        Random rnd = new Random();
        book.HouseNumber = rnd.Next();
    }
}

Note the same reference is used in the update code.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Do you need to set the binding mode programatically? It may be defaulting to OneTime.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the suggestion, but adding: bind.Mode = BindingMode.OneWay; Has no effect. –  Ben McIntosh Jan 2 '09 at 11:28
    
I may be misreading, but sounds like Beepcake means try setting the BindingMode to BindingMode.TwoWay. TextBlocks are OneWay by default. –  Jab Jan 2 '09 at 17:54
    
The code in question really works without setting any BindingMode –  Gennady Vanin Novosibirsk Apr 19 '13 at 8:00
add comment

I've just cut+pasted your code (and added a little), and it works fine for me:

    public Window1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();

        AddressBook book = new AddressBook();
        book.HouseNumber = 123;
        TextBlock tb = new TextBlock();
        Binding bind = new Binding("HouseNumber");
        bind.Source = book;
        bind.Mode = BindingMode.OneWay;
        tb.SetBinding(TextBlock.TextProperty, bind); // Text block displays "123"
        myGrid.Children.Add(tb);
        book.HouseNumber = 456; 
    }

    private void TestButton_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        AddressBook book = 
           (AddressBook(TextBlock)
              myGrid.Children[0])
              .GetBindingExpression(TextBlock.TextProperty)
              .DataItem;

        book.HouseNumber++;
    }

Displays 456 on startup, clicking the button makes the number in the TextBlock increment just fine.

Perhaps you are looking in the wrong place for the cause of the problem?

share|improve this answer
    
+1 This is very enriching to see how to get data obj from GUI (child) element ... though you could get it more simply as in Cameron MacFarland's answer –  Gennady Vanin Novosibirsk Apr 19 '13 at 7:57
add comment

Are you sure you're updating the same object as you've used in the binding? At first glance nothing looks wrong, so check the simple things. :)

share|improve this answer
    
That was going to be my next suggestion :) –  Steven Robbins Jan 2 '09 at 11:32
    
I created a completely unique object instance called "testing" and updated it once before binding and once after binding and the text block stayed at the value before binding even though the PropertyChanged event for "testing" fired. –  Ben McIntosh Jan 2 '09 at 11:49
add comment

Does any code bypass the property, setting the field (_houseNumber) directly?

share|improve this answer
    
PropertyChanged woudln't fire then would it? –  Steven Robbins Jan 2 '09 at 11:33
    
True, true... just trying to think why the text-block isn't updating... –  Marc Gravell Jan 2 '09 at 11:37
    
Just make sure I wasn't being dim :) My money is on the code updating a different instance of AddressBook :) –  Steven Robbins Jan 2 '09 at 11:39
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.