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I am trying to create a generic class that handles ints, doubles, and strings. However, when trying to instantiate the template class with I get the following error message:

error: 'double' is not a valid type for a template constant parameter

The instantiation works completely fine with int types, as does the internal code, though I haven't made it to string types yet. It seems as if this should be fine, since you can instantiate vector, etc. Is there something I am missing here?

// file forest.h

template<typename NODETYPE> class Forest
{
    template<NODETYPE>                                              // Line 15
    friend Forest<NODETYPE>& operator+(Forest<NODETYPE>& f1,
                                       Forest<NODETYPE>& f2);

    template<NODETYPE>                                              // Line 17
    friend ostream& operator<<(ostream& output,
                               const Forest<NODETYPE>& f1);

    template<NODETYPE>                                              // Line 19
    friend void outputHelper(ostream& output,
                             const ForestNode<NODETYPE>& currentNode,
                             int depth);
    /* ... */
};

The error occurs as follows:

\project 4\forest.h|341|instantiated from here|
\project 4\forest.h|15|error: 'double' is not a valid type for a template constant parameter|
\project 4\forest.h|17|error: 'double' is not a valid type for a template constant parameter|
\project 4\forest.h|19|error: 'double' is not a valid type for a template constant parameter|
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7  
@joedillian: "Is there something I am missing here?" - Yes. You're missing some code in your question. It will be extremely helpful if you can show us a minimal code snippet that reproduces the problem. – In silico Oct 31 '10 at 21:51
1  
Are you trying to have a template type parameter, have template constant parameter, or do template specializations? They're different things. Maybe you meant to do one of them, and did another on accident? Please show some code, and we'll help you figure out which you were doing, and which you should be doing. – Merlyn Morgan-Graham Oct 31 '10 at 21:53
    
To be honest, I'm not really sure how to make a microcosm of said error. Last time I posted, I got told i would recieve no help because my code sample was too large. And now I'm told I'm going to be ignored because I can't provide code. :-/ I will post the entirety of my code momentarily. – joedillian Oct 31 '10 at 21:59
1  
@joedillian: The reason why we ask for a minimal code snippet is because it forces you to actually look at the problem. I'm not saying that you didn't put any effort into your question, but actually trying to reproduce the problem with a minimal code snippet will help you understand its root cause. Also, it allows us to pinpoint the root cause better and faster and allow for more relevant answers. – In silico Oct 31 '10 at 22:02
1  
@joe: If you understand your code, you should be able to strip out the irrelevant parts and post what's left. Asking a question about errors in your code without code is like walking to a car repair shop without your car and asking "what's wrong with my car?". – GManNickG Oct 31 '10 at 22:04
up vote 3 down vote accepted
template<NODETYPE> friend Forest<NODETYPE>& operator+(Forest<NODETYPE>& f1, Forest<NODETYPE>& f2);

    template<NODETYPE> friend ostream& operator<<(ostream& output, const Forest<NODETYPE>& f1);

    template<NODETYPE> friend void outputHelper(ostream& output, const ForestNode<NODETYPE>& currentNode, int depth);

These friend declarations are invalid. If you have a templated class, you don't need to repeat it's template arguments when referring to it within it's own scope. Even if you intended to allow any other instantiation of Forest, then you would have to use typename or class and call NODETYPE something else.

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Thanks for your help. I kind of understand what my mistake was. Basically I was using NODETYPE to refer both to the type of the forest, and the type of the input in the friend function, right? – joedillian Oct 31 '10 at 22:58
    
@joedillian: Yes. – Puppy Nov 1 '10 at 10:53

You can use double (or float or long double) as a template parameter with any compiler that's even sort of close to conforming. What you can't do is use a floating point value as a non-type template parameter.

The closest you can get to this is generally passing the floating point value(s) to the ctor, and store it/them in your object.

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Template constant parameter of floating point value (like double) are forbidden.

template <double x> struct A {};

However you can instantiate a template with type double (what you'd like to do, if I get your question).

template <typename T> struct A {};
... 
A<double> a;

If you want to specialize your template for the specific type double, then do

template <typename T> struct A {};
template <> struct A<double> {...};
share|improve this answer
    
My class is declared with template<typename T> and the friend functions functions are declared as template<T>. Yet when I try to instantiate class<double>* foo = new class<double>() it says that double is not an acceptable parameter. – joedillian Oct 31 '10 at 22:23
1  
Ok I see. The error msg may be misleading but you can't do template<NODETYPE> friend Forest<NODETYPE>& operator+(Forest<NODETYPE>& f1, Forest<NODETYPE>& f2); that is something like template <T> fun(T t); A correct prototype looks like template <typename T> fun(T t); – log0 Oct 31 '10 at 22:38

you're most likely trying to do something like this:

template_type<3.1415926d> blarg;  

somewhere, somehow.
this is not allowed. doubles (floats, long doubles) are not allowed as template constant parameters. now something you probably will run into too is this:

template_type<"life, the universe and everything"> blarg;  

this too is (for some reason) not admissable, since the pointer type should have external linkage so:

char* my_str="life, the universe and everything";
template_type<my_str> blarg;

shoule be just fine

now as a side note: some compilers do or did allow floating-point constants (iirc gcc 3, probably others)

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