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I am currently working on a stack that implements linked list. I am having a problem when it comes to overloading the "=" operator. I am very clueless as to what to do. If anyone could point me in a good direction that would be awesome.

//operator overload
template <class S>
const Stack<S>::operator=( const Stack& s )
{

    if (s.isEmpty())
        theFront = theTop = 0
    else
    {
        NodePointer temp = q->theFront;

        while(temp != 0)
        {
            push(temp->data);
            temp = temp->next;
        }
    }

    return *this;
}

I am also getting this error : Stack, std::allocator > >::Node::Node(std::basic_string, std::allocator >)' referenced from C:\USERS\JOHNNY\DESKTOP\STACK\INFIX_TO_RPN.OBJ

Can this be fixed by my operator overload function?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You need to empty the current stack, before pushing data on it. You should add a removeAll function, and call it at the top of the assignment (after a check for self assignment, which is also a good idea). Otherwise, it looks correct. So, the end result would be:

//operator overload 
template <class S> 
const Stack<S>::operator=( const Stack& s ) 
{ 
    // Check for self assignment
    if (&s==this)
        return *this;

    // Clear the current stack
    removeAll();

    // Copy all data from stack s
    if (!s.isEmpty())
    { 
        NodePointer temp = q->theFront; 

        while(temp != 0) 
        { 
            push(temp->data); 
            temp = temp->next; 
        } 
    } 

    return *this; 
} 

Here is a sample removeAll function:

template <class S> 
void Stack<S>::removeAll()    
{ 
    while (s.theFront)
    {
        NodePointer p = s.theFront;

        s.theFront = s.theFront->next;
        delete p;
    }

    s.theTop = s.theFront;
}
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This was amazing thank you so much! –  Johnrad Nov 1 '10 at 1:12
    
You're welcome... –  Michael Goldshteyn Nov 1 '10 at 1:13
    
Do you have any idea why I would get this error?? Stack<std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> > >::Node::Node(std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> >)' referenced from C:\USERS\JOHNNY\DESKTOP\STACK\INFIX_TO_RPN.OBJ –  Johnrad Nov 1 '10 at 1:18
    
I presume it's a link time error, because the Node constructor is undefined (or not part of the build)? –  Michael Goldshteyn Nov 1 '10 at 1:21
    
My node class is a private member of my stack class. –  Johnrad Nov 1 '10 at 1:24

Instead of manually implementing the copy assignment operator for your class, use the copy-and-swap idiom.

Once you've implemented a swap() function for your class (the article to which I linked above provides an excellent description of how to do this), the operator= overload becomes short and simple:

Stack& operator=(Stack rhs)
{
    swap(rhs);
    return *this;
}
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You do realize that by passing rhs by value, you will be deep copying the right hand side with each assignment, even if there is potentially a gain to be had here with exception safety? –  Michael Goldshteyn Nov 1 '10 at 1:15
    
@Michael: You have to make a copy. You have a choice between taking rhs by value and having the copy made in the function call, or taking rhs by const reference and making the copy yourself in the body of the assignment operator. The compiler may frequently be able to eliminate the former copy; it all but certainly can't elide the latter. –  James McNellis Nov 1 '10 at 1:18
    
Consider what would happen if both the source stack and the destination stack are very large (Hint: 3 > 2) –  Michael Goldshteyn Nov 1 '10 at 1:19
    
@Michael: I have considered that. Have you read the article to which I linked? –  James McNellis Nov 1 '10 at 1:20
    
It's not an article, it's a pointer to an SO question with links that are too small (to humanly read) and answers that are too many to "gloss over." It was at this point that I totally lost interest. –  Michael Goldshteyn Nov 1 '10 at 1:22

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