Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a code that works well here:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;
use Data::Dumper;



        my %graph =(
            F => ['B','C','E'],
            A => ['B','C'],
            D => ['B'],
            C => ['A','E','F'],
            E => ['C','F'],
            B => ['A','E','F']
        );

        sub findPaths {
            my( $seen,  $start, $end ) = @_;

            return [[$end]] if $start eq $end;

            $seen->{ $start } = 1;
            my @paths;
            for my $node ( @{ $graph{ $start } } ) {
                my %seen = %{$seen};
                next if exists $seen{ $node };
                push @paths, [ $start, @$_ ] for @{ findPaths( \%seen, $node, $end ) };
            }
            return \@paths;
        }


            my $start = "B";
            my $end   = "E";
        print "@$_\n" for @{ findPaths( {}, $start, $end ) };

What I want to do is to generate a more general subroutine so that it just take \%graph, $start,$end as input and return final array.

I tried to do it this way but it doesn't compile.

sub findPathsAll {

    my ($graph,$start,$end) = @_;

    my $findPaths_sub;
        $findPaths_sub {
            my( $seen) = @_;

            return [[$end]] if $start eq $end;

            $seen->{ $start } = 1;
            my @paths;
            for my $node ( @{ $graph{ $start } } ) {
                my %seen = %{$seen};
                next if exists $seen{ $node };
                push @paths, [ $start, @$_ ] for @{ &$findPaths_sub( \%seen, $node, $end ) };
            }
            return \@paths;
        }


    my @all;
    push @all,@$_ for @{ &$findPaths_sub( {}, $start, $end ) };
    return @all;
}

What's the right way to do it?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I can't figure out what you want findPathsAll to return, so this may not be quite what you want. Anyway, here's a translation of findPaths into a lexical recursive coderef:

use Scalar::Util 'weaken';

sub findPathsAll {
  my ($graph,$start,$end) = @_;

  my $findPaths_sub;
  my $strongRef = $findPaths_sub = sub {
    my( $seen, $start, $end ) = @_;

    return [[$end]] if $start eq $end;

    $seen->{ $start } = 1;
    my @paths;
    for my $node ( @{ $graph->{ $start } } ) {
      my %seen = %{$seen};
      next if exists $seen{ $node };
      push @paths, [ $start, @$_ ]
          for @{ $findPaths_sub->( \%seen, $node, $end ) };
    }
    return \@paths;
  };

  weaken($findPaths_sub);       # Prevent memory leak

  my @all;
  push @all,@$_ for @{ $findPaths_sub->( {}, $start, $end ) };
  return @all;

  ## The above turns all the paths into one big list of nodes.
  ## I think maybe you meant this:
  #    return @{ $findPaths_sub->( {}, $start, $end ) };
  ## which would return a list of arrayrefs, one for each path.
}

Some notes:

You declare a coderef like this:

$var = sub { ... };

Note the assignment operator and the trailing semicolon. If you want the coderef to be recursive, you must have already declared $var. (If you say my $var = sub { ... };, the new variable doesn't exist until after the sub is created, so it can't refer to $var.)

You call it like this:

$var->(arg1, arg2, ...);

(There are other syntaxes that work, but I think this is the preferred one.)

There was a subtle memory leak in the first version I posted. Perl uses a reference-count garbage collector, which means it can't delete self-referential data structures. Since the coderef in $findPaths_sub captured a reference to itself, it would never be cleaned up (until program exit). I now use the weaken function from Scalar::Util (as mentioned by singingfish in his blog entry) to avoid that. $strongRef is used only to keep the coderef from being garbage collected before we're done with it.

share|improve this answer

I blogged about this very issue the other day.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.