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Does DB2 have anything like ORDER BY ord_col NULLS FIRST?

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3 Answers 3

You use a case in the order by to sort nulls before other values:

select  *
from    YourTable
order by
        case when col1 is null then 0 else 1 end
,       col1
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1  
+1 This is the most general solution. A bit more verbose than using COALESCE or NVL, but it will work for any datatype in col1 and it's quite simple. –  Lukas Eder May 14 '11 at 8:49
    
<code>COALESCE</code> did fine for me :) –  Ampp3 Jan 16 '13 at 21:24

There is nothing such like ORDER BY ord_col NULLS FIRST in DB2, but you can use functions to get the same behavior:

CREATE TABLE TV84 (
   CORN CHAR(2) NOT NULL
  ,COUAG CHAR(4) NOT NULL
  ,DDFA DATE NOT NULL
  ,MTFAC1 INTEGER
);

INSERT INTO TV84 (CORN,COUAG,DDFA,MTFAC1)
VALUES ('01','0309',TO_DATE('10.05.2008','MM.DD.YYYY'),2520);
INSERT INTO TV84 (CORN,COUAG,DDFA,MTFAC1)
VALUES ('01','0309',TO_DATE('12.14.2008','MM.DD.YYYY'),NULL);
INSERT INTO TV84 (CORN,COUAG,DDFA,MTFAC1)
VALUES ('01','0309',TO_DATE('10.15.2009','MM.DD.YYYY'),6452);
INSERT INTO TV84 (CORN,COUAG,DDFA,MTFAC1)
VALUES ('02','0309',TO_DATE('06.16.2010','MM.DD.YYYY'),1283);
INSERT INTO TV84 (CORN,COUAG,DDFA,MTFAC1)
VALUES ('02','0309',TO_DATE('08.28.2010','MM.DD.YYYY'),NULL);
  • With the COALESCE scalar function:
SELECT CORN, COUAG, DDFA, MTFAC1
FROM TV84
ORDER BY COALESCE(MTFAC1,0);

CORN COUAG DDFA       MTFAC1
---- ----- ---------- -----------
01   0309  14.12.2008           -
02   0309  28.08.2010           -
02   0309  16.06.2010        1283
01   0309  05.10.2008        2520
01   0309  15.10.2009        6452
  • Or more explicit with the ROW_NUMBER OLAP function (see OLAP functions):
SELECT CORN, COUAG, DDFA, MTFAC1
  ,ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY MTFAC1 NULLS FIRST) RN
FROM TV84
ORDER BY RN;

CORN COUAG DDFA       MTFAC1      RN
---- ----- ---------- ----------- --------------------
01   0309  14.12.2008           -                    1
02   0309  28.08.2010           -                    2
02   0309  16.06.2010        1283                    3
01   0309  05.10.2008        2520                    4
01   0309  15.10.2009        6452                    5

Update: For the OLAP function solution, if you need to order by an additional column, it's better to use the RANK or DENSE_RANK functions:

SELECT CORN, COUAG, DDFA, MTFAC1
  ,RANK() OVER (ORDER BY MTFAC1 NULLS FIRST) RNK
FROM TV84
ORDER BY RNK;

CORN COUAG DDFA       MTFAC1      RNK
---- ----- ---------- ----------- --------------------
01   0309  14.12.2008           -                    1
02   0309  28.08.2010           -                    1
02   0309  16.06.2010        1283                    3
01   0309  05.10.2008        2520                    4
01   0309  15.10.2009        6452                    5
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+1 For COALESCE(MTFAC1,0)... and welcome to Stack Overflow –  Andomar Nov 2 '10 at 16:30
    
Thank you! The NVL(MTFAC1,0) function works too, but I think this is supported only starting from version 9.7 of DB2 database. –  Bruno Gautier Nov 4 '10 at 9:13

No, I don't believe so.

You can emulate the behaviour with something like:

select 0 as seq, col1, col2 from tbl where col1 is null
union all
select 1 as seq, col1, col2 from tbl where col1 is not null
order by 1, 2

and then ignoring the seq column in your data processing code.

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That produces a quite expensive execution plan (two null checks on col1 for the entire tbl), while being quite intrusive on the original query itself (additional seq column, difficult to add additional filters, order by clauses, etc). Compared to other solutions with a case statement, I wouldn't do it this way... –  Lukas Eder May 14 '11 at 8:47
    
Lukas, that's not actually true according to the analysis I carried out. The fact that you differentiate the to parts means that (1) the index is fully used to efficiently get each part (null and not null) and (2) a multi-thread execution engine ran them in parallel then combine them. A case variant was running a per-row function on every row, which was horribly inefficient. –  paxdiablo May 14 '11 at 10:47
    
nice! I hadn't thought of that possibility. So your CBO (or whatever that is called in DB2) transformed the union all away in order to parallelise the two individual selects. That's not very obvious but quite smart. Is that a documented query transformation in DB2? –  Lukas Eder May 14 '11 at 10:50

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