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(Disclaimer: I don't know what the C++ standard might say about this..I know, I'm horrible)

while operating on very large strings I noticed that std::string is using copy-on-write. I managed to write the smallest loop that would reproduce the observed behaviour and the following one, for instance, runs suspiciously fast:

#include <string>
using std::string;
int main(void) {
    string basestr(1024 * 1024 * 10, 'A');
    for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++) {
        string a_copy = basestr;
    }
}

when adding a write in the loop body a_copy[1] = 'B';, an actual copy apparently took place, and the program ran in 0.3s instead of a few milliseconds. 100 writes slowed it down by about 100 times.

But then it got weird. Some of my strings weren't written to, only read from, and this was not reflected in the execution time, which was almost exactly proportional to the number of operations on the strings. With some digging, I found that simply reading from a string still gave me that performance hit, so it led me to assume GNU STL strings are using copy-on-read (?).

#include <string>
using std::string;
int main(void) {
    string basestr(1024 * 1024 * 10, 'A');
    for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++) {
        string a_copy = basestr;
        a_copy[99]; // this also ran in 0.3s!
    }
}

After revelling in my discovery for a while, I found out that reading (with operator[]) from the base string also takes 0.3s for the entire toy program..I'm not 100% comfortable with this. Are STL strings indeed copy-on-read, or are they allowing copy-on-write at all? I'm led to think that operator[] has some safeguards against one who would keep the reference it returns and later write to it; is this really the case? If not, what is really happening? If someone can point to some relevant section in the C++ standard, that'd also be appreciated.

For reference, I'm using g++ (Ubuntu 4.4.3-4ubuntu5) 4.4.3, and the GNU STL.

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As the answers below suggest this is probably more of a compiler question than a C++ standard question. Which compiler are you using? Have you tried different optimization settings? –  Björn Pollex Nov 1 '10 at 8:17
    
More than the compiler I'd imagine that this has to do with the specific STL implementation that the OP is using. From a standards perspective I think Charles Bailey has already answered. –  Raj Nov 1 '10 at 8:19
    
C++98/03 was intended to allow COW strings, but COW isn't required. Incidentally, std::string isn't part of the STL even though STL concepts were later applied to it. –  Roger Pate Nov 1 '10 at 8:23
1  
@Roger: That is very interesting! So, while it's not mandated by the standard, std::string may in fact use COW as it's allowed? –  Michael Foukarakis Nov 1 '10 at 8:40
7  
Just wanted to note that copy on write is probably going to fade away in C++0x with the introduction of move semantics (makes COW obsolete for many typical use cases) and concurrency (makes COW potentially very inefficient due to synchronization issues). –  fredoverflow Nov 1 '10 at 9:15

3 Answers 3

up vote 14 down vote accepted

C++ doesn't distinguish between the operator[] for reading and writing, but only the operator[] for const object and mutable (non-const) object. Since a_copy is mutable, the mutable operator[] will be chosen, which forces the copying because that operator returns a (mutable) reference.

If efficiency is a concern, you could cast the a_copy to a const string to force the const version of operator[] to be used, which won't make a copy of the internal buffer.

char f = static_cast<const string>(a_copy)[99];
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I hadn't considered const-ness as a factor at all. Thanks for that. Efficiency is not quite my concern here, as much as the internals of GNU STL, I suppose. Know your tools and all that. :) –  Michael Foukarakis Nov 1 '10 at 9:00
2  
You should use const_cast<>(msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bz6at95h(VS.80).aspx) for CV casting. –  J-16 SDiZ Nov 4 '10 at 9:03
    
@J-16: No, no, you shouldn't. That cast is only useful for removing const, which is very rarely the correct thing to do. –  Puppy Nov 4 '10 at 9:22
    
@DeadMG, no. see the (draft) standard : open-std.org/jtc1/sc22/wg21/docs/papers/2010/n3126.pdf [5.2.11][expr.const.cast], footnote (73) say const_cast is not limited to conversions that cast away a const-qualifer. See 5.2.11#3 for this specific case. –  J-16 SDiZ Nov 4 '10 at 9:32
    
@J-16: Except for the part where using the other casts can add const just fine and there's no reason to use const_cast over them in this scenario. The only reason to use const_cast is to cast away const. –  Puppy Nov 4 '10 at 9:37

The C++ standard doesn't prohibit or mandate copy-on-write or any other implementation details for std::string. So long as the semantics and complexity requirements are met an implementation may choose whatever implementation strategy it likes.

Note that operator[] on a non-const string is effectively a "write" operation as it returns a reference that can be used to modify the string at any point up to the next operation that mutates the the string. No copies should be affected by such a modification.

Have you tried profiling one of these two?

const string a_copy = basestr;
a_copy[99];

Or

string a_copy = basestr;
const std::string& a_copy_ref = a_copy;
a_copy_ref[99];
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Indeed, both of those two loop bodies are equally fast with the first example; that is, only a few milliseconds. –  Michael Foukarakis Nov 1 '10 at 8:36

Try this code:

#include <iostream>
#include <iomanip>
#include <string>

using namespace std;

template<typename T>
void dump(std::ostream & ostr, const T & val)
{
    const unsigned char * cp = reinterpret_cast<const unsigned char *>(&val);
    for(int i=0; i<sizeof(T); i++)
        ostr
            << setw(2) << setfill('0') << hex << (int)cp[i] << ' ';
    ostr << endl;
}

int main(void) {
    string a = "hello world";
    string b = a;
    dump(cout,a);
    dump(cout,b);

    char c = b[0];

    dump(cout,a);
    dump(cout,b);
}

On GCC, this is the output I get:

3c 10 51 00
3c 10 51 00
3c 10 51 00
5c 10 51 00

Which would seem to indicate that yes, they are copy on read in this case.

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