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This is definitely subjective, but I'd like to try to avoid it becoming argumentative. I think it could be an interesting question if people treat it appropriately.

The idea for this question came from the comment thread from my answer to the "What are five things you hate about your favorite language?" question. I contended that classes in C# should be sealed by default - I won't put my reasoning in the question, but I might write a fuller explanation as an answer to this question. I was surprised at the heat of the discussion in the comments (25 comments currently).

So, what contentious opinions do you hold? I'd rather avoid the kind of thing which ends up being pretty religious with relatively little basis (e.g. brace placing) but examples might include things like "unit testing isn't actually terribly helpful" or "public fields are okay really". The important thing (to me, anyway) is that you've got reasons behind your opinions.

Please present your opinion and reasoning - I would encourage people to vote for opinions which are well-argued and interesting, whether or not you happen to agree with them.

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won't the answer with the fewest votes be the most controversial :)? –  Doug T. Jan 2 '09 at 14:09
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The controversial ones have the most comments, not upvotes. –  Bill the Lizard Jan 7 '09 at 3:35
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Awesome! 249 answers and newcomers aren't reading every other answer to avoid duplicates - in fact there are answers on here that have been posted many, many times. There is no possible way that leaving this open for new answers is contributory - closing still allows votes. PLEASE CLOSE. –  Adam Davis Feb 10 '09 at 21:35
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think the community wiki component needs to be stripped out of the Q/A system. It's fine to have a community wiki, but it shouldn't be a means for justifying the endless series of non-sense questions like this one. Please close. –  Mark Rogers Feb 10 '09 at 22:00
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This is a great question to farm badges. A guy with 11 rep has a gold badge. Hilarious. –  Robert S. May 1 '09 at 20:46
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408 Answers 408

Programmers who don't code in their spare time for fun will never become as good as those that do.

I think even the smartest and most talented people will never become truly good programmers unless they treat it as more than a job. Meaning that they do little projects on the side, or just mess with lots of different languages and ideas in their spare time.

(Note: I'm not saying good programmers do nothing else than programming, but they do more than program from 9 to 5)

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1/ There is a difference between enthusiasm and ability. 2/ Imagine if they said that about doctors. Or demolition experts. Or soldiers, or.... –  kpollock Jan 12 '09 at 16:04
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Maybe they will never be as good as the ones who do it on their spare time, but they may have more fulfilling lives. I mean, come on, you spend at least 40 hours a week typing away at the stuff, do you really want to go home and do it some more? Play some tennis or something :P –  Ace Jan 19 '09 at 13:38
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People who's sole interest is programming, both on and of the job, may very well be execellent programmers. But I don't think I would want to "hang out" with this type of person. You don't need to become autistic about it. There is more to being a human being than writing code. –  Diego Deberdt Jan 26 '09 at 7:33
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@Diego: 'But I don't think I would want to "hang out" with this type of person. You don't need to become autistic about it.' I don't think I'd like to "hang out" with a judgemental 9-5'er troll either. Feel sorry for you that you can't understand having a real passion for something. Your loss. –  ljs Jan 27 '09 at 10:06
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@kronoz: having a passion for something is great. But I feel sorry for those who have a passion for only one thing and nothing else. Their loss. –  Treb Jan 28 '09 at 13:26
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The only "best practice" you should be using all the time is "Use Your Brain".

Too many people jumping on too many bandwagons and trying to force methods, patterns, frameworks etc onto things that don't warrant them. Just because something is new, or because someone respected has an opinion, doesn't mean it fits all :)

EDIT: Just to clarify - I don't think people should ignore best practices, valued opinions etc. Just that people shouldn't just blindly jump on something without thinking about WHY this "thing" is so great, IS it applicable to what I'm doing, and WHAT benefits/drawbacks does it bring?

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It doesn't sound controversial, but the amount of times I get a "WTF?" face from people when I question the use of a particular tech/method/whatever in a meeting is quite alarming :) –  Steven Robbins Jan 2 '09 at 13:38
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Not only is it not controversial, but it's not true. I'm happy to use my brain, but there's a lot to be gained from looking at people smarter than you and saying - This smart person does this thing this way and I'd be wise to listen. –  seanyboy Jan 2 '09 at 14:12
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I think you are missing the point entirely seanyboy.. the point is not to ignore any other opinions or technology, it's to evaluate them yourself and apply them where you feel they will be of value, rather than blindly implementing something because AN Other said it was the way to do it! –  Steven Robbins Jan 2 '09 at 14:15
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If it weren't against the rules I would create 10 more accounts to vote you up on this one. I see this all of the time and it's depressing. –  nlaq Jan 5 '09 at 6:41
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The phrase I tend to use is, "Blindly following Best Practices is not a Best Practice." –  Dave Markle Aug 10 '09 at 12:21
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Most comments in code are in fact a pernicious form of code duplication.

We spend most of our time maintaining code written by others (or ourselves) and poor, incorrect, outdated, misleading comments must be near the top of the list of most annoying artifacts in code.

I think eventually many people just blank them out, especially those flowerbox monstrosities.

Much better to concentrate on making the code readable, refactoring as necessary, and minimising idioms and quirkiness.

On the other hand, many courses teach that comments are very nearly more important than the code itself, leading to the this next line adds one to invoiceTotal style of commenting.

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The code should tell you how...the comments should tell you why... –  Richard Everett Jan 2 '09 at 14:59
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This seems to be people misunderstanding the differences between school and work. Teachers want pupils to explain what they were trying to do so they can correct the code to match the intent. Once one is writing code that will be read by peers the purpose and content of comments is different. –  duncan Jan 2 '09 at 21:39
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If you can't understand my code without comments, there's something wrong with my code. Adding comments may mitigate the problem, but doesn't fix it. –  Jay Bazuzi Jan 2 '09 at 22:18
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The book "Refactoring" (by Martin Fowler) identifies comments as one of the "code smells": if the code needs comments, it isn't clear enough and needs to be refactored. –  ShreevatsaR Jan 2 '09 at 22:31
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Simple rule I use when commenting: Don't comment what you did, comment why you did it. I can see what you did; the question is typically why in the world you would want do it that way (and there are often non-obvious reasons) –  LKM Jan 10 '09 at 12:48
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"Googling it" is okay!

Yes, I know it offends some people out there that their years of intense memorization and/or glorious stacks of programming books are starting to fall by the wayside to a resource that anyone can access within seconds, but you shouldn't hold that against people that use it.

Too often I hear googling answers to problems the result of criticism, and it really is without sense. First of all, it must be conceded that everyone needs materials to reference. You don't know everything and you will need to look things up. Conceding that, does it really matter where you got the information? Does it matter if you looked it up in a book, looked it up on Google, or heard it from a talking frog that you hallucinated? No. A right answer is a right answer.

What is important is that you understand the material, use it as the means to an end of a successful programming solution, and the client/your employer is happy with the results.

(although if you are getting answers from hallucinatory talking frogs, you should probably get some help all the same)

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Google will provide knowledge, but it cannot provide skill. Poor developers will not be aware of the difference. –  Tom Jan 5 '09 at 2:40
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@Tom - That's true, but I'm just saying I don't think that should be held against Google. If we're going to judge whether someone is a good or bad developer, Google usage isn't going to be the indicator. –  Gene Roberts Jan 5 '09 at 15:46
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The problem is not the people that Google as a reference; it's the subset of people that Google blocks of code, paste them into the project and then monkey with the variables/flow until it compiles. It compiles?! Ship it! –  joshperry Feb 11 '09 at 2:50
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>"does it really matter where you got the information?" - Yes it does. The proofreading and research that goes into most (reputable) books is worth it. I just can't say the same for joe schmoe's website. –  SnOrfus Mar 15 '09 at 3:26
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@snorfus: How does a new developer tell a good book from a bad one? Many books about PHP programming contain horrible practices, consistently repeated in every code example (for example, concatenating $_GET variables straight into a query). A person is better off with google in those cases, because at least they'll get a mix of good and bad code. If you're new to a field you should always look at a variety of sources, and google can be one. –  Joeri Sebrechts Jul 19 '09 at 8:06
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XML is highly overrated

I think too many jump onto the XML bandwagon before using their brains... XML for web stuff is great, as it's designed for it. Otherwise I think some problem definition and design thoughts should preempt any decision to use it.

My 5 cents

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Data transmission. I've seen limited bandwith channels with things like <AVeryLongFieldName>A</AVeryLongFieldName>. In general, if you need concise, XML is probably not the solution. –  David Thornley Jan 9 '09 at 14:38
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You should only use XML for what it's designed, transporting data between different applications. It's no storage engine (defenitly no database! as some web developpers seem to think) and it's also not for storing your app state on shutdown. –  Pim Jager Jan 10 '09 at 10:30
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XML is like violence. If it isn't working for you, you're not using enough of it. :) –  Mikeage Feb 23 '09 at 4:58
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JSON is usually a better format for "web" stuff.. ;) –  Tracker1 Mar 20 '09 at 20:13
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<opinion><subject>god</subject><verb>bless</verb><object>you</object></opinion> –  Steve B. Apr 19 '09 at 0:22
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Not all programmers are created equal

Quite often managers think that DeveloperA == DeveloperB simply because they have same level of experience and so on. In actual fact, the performance of one developer can be 10x or even 100x that of another.

It's politically risky to talk about it, but sometimes I feel like pointing out that, even though several team members may appear to be of equal skill, it's not always the case. I have even seen cases where lead developers were 'beyond hope' and junior devs did all the actual work - I made sure they got the credit, though. :)

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Funny thing is... it's usually the worst devs that think they are 10x or 100x better than the others –  John Kraft Jan 2 '09 at 15:00
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I wasn't convinced about this being "controversial" until your point about the politics of recognizing it. Good point, there. –  Adam Bellaire Jan 2 '09 at 16:42
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Yeah, good luck explaining to your boss that In Your Humble Opinion, Joe is 10 times better programmer than Jack when your boss pays them equal wage for identical positions. Dangerous! –  Dmitri Nesteruk Jan 2 '09 at 16:53
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Another point to make is that prolific != skillful. –  Marcin Jan 2 '09 at 19:06
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+1 because I recognize myself in the "lead developers were 'beyond hope' and junior devs did all the actual work" part. (me being the lead developer) :-) –  jao Jul 1 '09 at 20:11
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I fail to understand why people think that Java is absolutely the best "first" programming language to be taught in universities.

For one, I believe that first programming language should be such that it highlights the need to learn control flow and variables, not objects and syntax

For another, I believe that people who have not had experience in debugging memory leaks in C / C++ cannot fully appreciate what Java brings to the table.

Also the natural progression should be from "how can I do this" to "how can I find the library which does that" and not the other way round.

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Counter proposal - C++ is the WORST first language to teach, IMO. –  Huntrods Jan 2 '09 at 19:21
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I think C should be the first language taught, because it makes you need to understand more of "what's under the hood"... Once you can code C well, then have the second language be something very OO. Then something very functional. After that everything is easy. –  Alex Baranosky Jan 4 '09 at 14:00
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I teach at University-level and I think a object-oriented language is a good first language and Java was one of my favorites. But now-days I actually prefer Python, because it is a real script-language, fantastic syntax, multi-paradigm and Java have become harder to handle for beginners. –  P-A Feb 23 '09 at 17:07
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Everyone should learn [pet language] first, because of [pet feature(s)]. Personally I don't think what first language you choose is very important, it's far more important that it's not the only one you ever learn. Having a broader outlook leads to better developers. –  Richard Nichols Apr 16 '09 at 2:44
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When I started my first programming job 20 years ago, I was the only one of my group who had never coded with punchcards. Everybody thought that C coders were coddled with CRTs and magnetic media. Just because something is old does not mean that it is the best choice for a first language. I think it's reasonable to pick an environment with fewer barriers to entry. –  David Chappelle May 29 '09 at 19:22
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If you only know one language, no matter how well you know it, you're not a great programmer.

There seems to be an attitude that says once you're really good at C# or Java or whatever other language you started out learning then that's all you need. I don't believe it- every language I have ever learned has taught me something new about programming that I have been able to bring back into my work with all the others. I think that anyone who restricts themselves to one language will never be as good as they could be.

It also indicates to me a certain lack of inquistiveness and willingness to experiment that doesn't necessarily tally with the qualities I would expect to find in a really good programmer.

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Would you go as far as to say if you only know one kind of language you're not a great programmer? For instance, knowing Java and C# isn't that much better than knowing just one or the other - but knowing Java and Haskell will give much more of an open mind, IMO. –  Jon Skeet Jan 2 '09 at 14:02
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completely reasonable and uncontroversial opinion - you fail, sir –  annakata Jan 2 '09 at 14:49
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I'm not sure I agree. Even though I kind of happen to know a few languages, if I'm interviewing a person who only knows C# but to a very good degree, they'll get hired. Would you pass by an expert just because they don't diversify? I wouldn't. –  Dmitri Nesteruk Jan 2 '09 at 16:05
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In fact, I think everyone should learn an Imperative OO language (Java, C++, Python whatever), a functional language (haskell, erlang, OCaml whatever), a concatenative language (Factor, Forth, Cat, Joy etc), a logic programming language (Prolog, Mercury etc) and a dataflow language (labview, estereel, Lustre, verilog, pure data, MAX/MSP etc). This combination will show you that a) there are many radically different paradigms out there, b) some languages really are different and c) you cannot learn them all from a reference. –  Dan Jul 7 '09 at 15:02
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I would argue that a person is not a master of their field until they are sufficiently well versed in their options such that they both have the knowledge to pick the right tool for the job, and understanding to be flexible enough to do so. For a programmer on a single platform, this might mean a deep knowledge of the language's tools and libraries, but for someone designing a solution, this also means a deep knowledge of programming language paradigms. –  T.R. Jul 9 '09 at 3:34
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Performance does matter.

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I think this is a counter to the widely held opinion that performance doesn't matter since "you can always buy more CPU, hard disk, RAM etc". –  Ed Guiness Jan 2 '09 at 14:11
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And I thought the simplicity of the comment was it's main appeal. Ok, for example, many developers do not think about the time complexity of the algorithms that they use. Lesser developers reading this comment just ran off to wikipedia to find out what time complexity is. –  Daniel Paull Jan 2 '09 at 14:15
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If there weren't so many programmers who think that "you can always buy more RAM", we could nowadays run a complete office suite, a graphical web browser with flash, java etc. plugins, several messaging and online game clients concurrently on a 1 GHz, 256 MB RAM machine without any swap. –  Svante Jan 12 '09 at 16:33
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Clearly this is the first "controversial" opinion in this question that was really controversial –  1800 INFORMATION Jan 18 '09 at 9:45
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To state the obvious, Performance doesn't always matter, it only matters when it matters. The trick is being able to predict when that is before you start coding... Easier is figuring it out after you're done coding... –  Charles Bretana Jan 21 '09 at 23:45
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Print statements are a valid way to debug code

I believe it is perfectly fine to debug your code by littering it with System.out.println (or whatever print statement works for your language). Often, this can be quicker than debugging, and you can compare printed outputs against other runs of the app.

Just make sure to remove the print statements when you go to production (or better, turn them into logging statements)

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Absolutely, Make them into logging statements to begin with, and make them output to screen during dev. –  Christopher Mahan Jan 3 '09 at 1:50
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Yes, thus there are logging frameworks that make this process more organized. –  thenonhacker Jan 6 '09 at 7:07
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Until you forget to delete a debug statement and it goes to production, or delete an actual statement with a debug statement, when you are tired. Logging, dedicated debug output routines, and debuggers are your friends. –  Andrei Taranchenko Jan 10 '09 at 23:18
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SOMETIMES, it's the only way. Not all the time, but sometimes... –  LarryF Jan 14 '09 at 0:47
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Every time you consider writing a debug printout, consider writing a unit-test instead. I've found I use far less time that way. –  Markus Koivisto Jul 30 '09 at 10:19
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Your job is to put yourself out of work.

When you're writing software for your employer, any software that you create is to be written in such a way that it can be picked up by any developer and understood with a minimal amount of effort. It is well designed, clearly and consistently written, formatted cleanly, documented where it needs to be, builds daily as expected, checked into the repository, and appropriately versioned.

If you get hit by a bus, laid off, fired, or walk off the job, your employer should be able to replace you on a moment's notice, and the next guy could step into your role, pick up your code and be up and running within a week tops. If he or she can't do that, then you've failed miserably.

Interestingly, I've found that having that goal has made me more valuable to my employers. The more I strive to be disposable, the more valuable I become to them.

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Very nicely put... –  AndyUK Jan 5 '09 at 13:19
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This is the mantra that I've been living by for a long time. Not only is it our job to automate other people's job, but our job is to also automate our own job in the process. Crap Code != Job Security. –  Lusid Jan 26 '09 at 7:17
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or more extreme: replace yourself with a script you wrote –  Vardhan Mar 1 '09 at 10:52
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I was going to disagree with you but then I realized you're right. If you do get hit by a bus, then the project that you work on should suffer greatly. But not because your code is unreadable, but because your were so valuable to the team. –  Mark Beckwith Apr 24 '09 at 19:39
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If you can't be replaced then you can't be promoted! –  rezzif Aug 7 '09 at 4:54
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1) The Business Apps farce:

I think that the whole "Enterprise" frameworks thing is smoke and mirrors. J2EE, .NET, the majority of the Apache frameworks and most abstractions to manage such things create far more complexity than they solve.

Take any regular Java or .NET ORM, or any supposedly modern MVC framework for either which does "magic" to solve tedious, simple tasks. You end up writing huge amounts of ugly XML boilerplate that is difficult to validate and write quickly. You have massive APIs where half of those are just to integrate the work of the other APIs, interfaces that are impossible to recycle, and abstract classes that are needed only to overcome the inflexibility of Java and C#. We simply don't need most of that.

How about all the different application servers with their own darned descriptor syntax, the overly complex database and groupware products?

The point of this is not that complexity==bad, it's that unnecessary complexity==bad. I've worked in massive enterprise installations where some of it was necessary, but even in most cases a few home-grown scripts and a simple web frontend is all that's needed to solve most use cases.

I'd try to replace all of these enterprisey apps with simple web frameworks, open source DBs, and trivial programming constructs.

2) The n-years-of-experience-required:

Unless you need a consultant or a technician to handle a specific issue related to an application, API or framework, then you don't really need someone with 5 years of experience in that application. What you need is a developer/admin who can read documentation, who has domain knowledge in whatever it is you're doing, and who can learn quickly. If you need to develop in some kind of language, a decent developer will pick it up in less than 2 months. If you need an administrator for X web server, in two days he should have read the man pages and newsgroups and be up to speed. Anything less and that person is not worth what he is paid.

3) The common "computer science" degree curriculum:

The majority of computer science and software engineering degrees are bull. If your first programming language is Java or C#, then you're doing something wrong. If you don't get several courses full of algebra and math, it's wrong. If you don't delve into functional programming, it's incomplete. If you can't apply loop invariants to a trivial for loop, you're not worth your salt as a supposed computer scientist. If you come out with experience in x and y languages and object orientation, it's full of s***. A real computer scientist sees a language in terms of the concepts and syntaxes it uses, and sees programming methodologies as one among many, and has such a good understanding of the underlying philosophies of both that picking new languages, design methods, or specification languages should be trivial.

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1) I used to work for a big multinational that rhymed with Dunisys. Anyway we used to use the word "Enterprisy" to mean any solution that wasn't complex enough. Like, "asking the user for a password isn't enterprisy enough". –  Cameron MacFarland Jan 2 '09 at 14:22
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2) Back in 2002 I once saw a job add asking for 2-3 years of C# experience. This basically restricted the job to those who worked on the original C# design team. –  Cameron MacFarland Jan 2 '09 at 14:25
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Regarding (3), you sound like my echo. –  Mike Dunlavey Jan 2 '09 at 20:11
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I beleive in abstraction layers. I think the application should be abstracted from the OS in most scenarios. Finally .net/java decouple the app from the OS! Besides when a programmer can concentrate on the usability of an app over low level code, you always get a nicer application. –  Jeremy Jan 3 '09 at 20:50
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As far as #1, I think there is a tradeoff. Enterprise frameworks add a lot of structure that helps mediocre developers think about the problem in a more organized way. As a PHP developer, I've seen a lot of code that was the result of a developer just thinking of a page as a long list of commands to be executed sequentially. Applications built in this manner are incredibly difficult to debug and keep working, let alone build on top of. –  notJim May 8 '09 at 1:26
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Getters and Setters are Highly Overused

I've seen millions of people claiming that public fields are evil, so they make them private and provide getters and setters for all of them. I believe this is almost identical to making the fields public, maybe a bit different if you're using threads (but generally is not the case) or if your accessors have business/presentation logic (something 'strange' at least).

I'm not in favor of public fields, but against making a getter/setter (or Property) for everyone of them, and then claiming that doing that is encapsulation or information hiding... ha!

UPDATE:

This answer has raised some controversy in it's comments, so I'll try to clarify it a bit (I'll leave the original untouched since that is what many people upvoted).

First of all: anyone who uses public fields deserves jail time

Now, creating private fields and then using the IDE to automatically generate getters and setters for every one of them is nearly as bad as using public fields.

Many people think:

private fields + public accessors == encapsulation

I say (automatic or not) generation of getter/setter pair for your fields effectively goes against the so called encapsulation you are trying to achieve.

Lastly, let me quote Uncle Bob in this topic (taken from chapter 6 of "Clean Code"):

There is a reason that we keep our variables private. We don't want anyone else to depend on them. We want the freedom to change their type or implementation on a whim or an impulse. Why, then, do so many programmers automatically add getters and setters to their objects, exposing their private fields as if they were public?

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I wouldn't say it's encapsulation on its own - I'd say it's a first step on the road towards encapsulation. –  Jon Skeet Jan 2 '09 at 13:43
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This could be restated as "mindless getter/setters." I've found that most of the time you only need a getter. –  Leonardo Herrera Jan 2 '09 at 14:33
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getters and setters define the interface of your class. It allows you to add logic to the get/set later on, if required. Therefore preferable to public fields. –  Richard Everett Jan 2 '09 at 15:04
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This is plane and simply wrong. The idea behind encapsulation is that it provides the ability for the implementation of a class to evolve with affecting client code. That is precisely why you would want to hide a field behind a property. –  Diego Deberdt Jan 26 '09 at 7:43
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I'd give this two "up" votes if I could. It gives me screaming fits when I see people doing this - or even, as I saw recently, have their IDE do this AUTOMATICALLY for every data member... –  DevSolar Feb 15 '09 at 12:27
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UML diagrams are highly overrated

Of course there are useful diagrams e.g. class diagram for the Composite Pattern, but many UML diagrams have absolutely no value.

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I usually need to sketch up classes when designing an object-oriented system. I may as well use a standardized syntax for sketching. I'm not even forced to use ALL of the syntax, just the parts that I like. –  Lucas Lindström May 5 '09 at 20:48
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The way I see it, using a "standardised" diagram notation forces you into using some unnecessary syntax much of the time. I do agree with what UML does, but I think a standard is pointless. Circles and arrows are perfectly fine for nearly every case. –  DisgruntledGoat May 9 '09 at 23:34
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Ok, let's say that UML is worthless. Do you have any diagram templates to use it place of UML? Do you think diagrams in general are a waste of time? Is this a personal preference, as in do you use the list of directions (turn left, go one mile, turn right, etc.) to get somewhere you've never been? Do maps confuse you? I'm not trying to be snide, I truly believe that there is a personality difference between the visual and non-visual preferences of people. That could be what causes people to dislike UML: it's usefulness depends on the visual nature of the individual which is subjective. –  Kelly S. French Jul 16 '09 at 14:59
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Best use of UML is to not take it too seriously. Opening up a big package piece of software for UML? = You're doing too much big-design-up-front. Sketching on notepads? = Good. –  Ollie Saunders Oct 15 '09 at 4:39
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Opinion: SQL is code. Treat it as such

That is, just like your C#, Java, or other favorite object/procedure language, develop a formatting style that is readable and maintainable.

I hate when I see sloppy free-formatted SQL code. If you scream when you see both styles of curly braces on a page, why or why don't you scream when you see free formatted SQL or SQL that obscures or obfuscates the JOIN condition?

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And check it into source control –  Cameron MacFarland Jan 2 '09 at 14:52
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sqlinform.com is your friend. –  Christopher Mahan Jan 2 '09 at 15:22
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Amen! I have found if I ever have to update someone elses code and their formatting sucks, I have to reformat the code to make it readable before I can make my changes. –  Jeremy Jan 3 '09 at 20:53
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I've also heard "There's no code change required. We just need to tweak the SQL"! –  LaJmOn Jan 14 '09 at 14:53
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People still write SQL? j/k :P –  Lusid Jan 26 '09 at 7:15
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Readability is the most important aspect of your code.

Even more so than correctness. If it's readable, it's easy to fix. It's also easy to optimize, easy to change, easy to understand. And hopefully other developers can learn something from it too.

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I would temper this statement by replacing "readability" with "modifiability". I've seen entirely too much code that was made "readable" just by puffing it up with whitespace so you could see less of it, and being wordy instead of precise. –  Mike Dunlavey Jan 2 '09 at 17:00
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Why do people associate readability so strongly with whitespace? It's a part of it, but a small part. –  Craig P. Motlin Jan 5 '09 at 3:40
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Maintainability > Readability. I can auto-reformat code to make it readable anytime. –  thenonhacker Jan 6 '09 at 7:08
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again, readability is not white-space. readability includes level-of-nesting, function length, cyclomatic complexity, variable names, and a bunch of other things. –  Jimmy Jan 8 '09 at 20:59
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If the code is not correct, it is invalid. Code that is unreadable but works is always better than code that is readable but fails to do what it is supposed to do. That said, readable working code is much better than unreadable, non-working code. –  Callum Rogers Jul 19 '09 at 10:26
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If you're a developer, you should be able to write code

I did quite a bit of interviewing last year, and for my part of the interview I was supposed to test the way people thought, and how they implemented simple-to-moderate algorithms on a white board. I'd initially started out with questions like:

Given that Pi can be estimated using the function 4 * (1 - 1/3 + 1/5 - 1/7 + ...) with more terms giving greater accuracy, write a function that calculates Pi to an accuracy of 5 decimal places.

It's a problem that should make you think, but shouldn't be out of reach to a seasoned developer (it can be answered in about 10 lines of C#). However, many of our (supposedly pre-screened by the agency) candidates couldn't even begin to answer it, or even explain how they might go about answering it. So after a while I started asking simpler questions like:

Given the area of a circle is given by Pi times the radius squared, write a function to calculate the area of a circle.

Amazingly, more than half the candidates couldn't write this function in any language (I can read most popular languages so I let them use any language of their choice, including pseudo-code). We had "C# developers" who could not write this function in C#.

I was surprised by this. I had always thought that developers should be able to write code. It seems that, nowadays, this is a controversial opinion. Certainly it is amongst interview candidates!


Edit:

There's a lot of discussion in the comments about whether the first question is a good or bad one, and whether you should ask questions as complex as this in an interview. I'm not going to delve into this here (that's a whole new question) apart from to say you're largely missing the point of the post.

Yes, I said people couldn't make any headway with this, but the second question is trivial and many people couldn't make any headway with that one either! Anybody who calls themselves a developer should be able to write the answer to the second one in a few seconds without even thinking. And many can't.

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2 words: Fizz Buzz. –  Kibbee Jan 2 '09 at 17:32
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Give them a real question not a mathematical question. Job interviews give nervous and stress to people. This kind of questions are a waste of time for all. Real questions for real Job. I like this questions but if someone hiring to me ask them, i don't want this job. The hirer is not professional. –  FerranB Jan 2 '09 at 23:18
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@ PhoenixRedeemer: I don't think this is a math question at all. A programmer should be able to implement a simple formula like that. That doesn't test your math skills. Besides, a programmer is supposed to have some math background, so it shouldn't be so confusing even if you are nervous. –  Marc Jan 3 '09 at 12:30
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I don't understand the purpose... Why do you need to calculate pi? PI is (essentially) constant. WTF. If anyone writes a function longer than: function() { return 3.14159 } They're wasting their time. –  jason Jun 8 '09 at 16:06
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@jason - It's to test your ability to think about a problem, break it down into its component parts, and write code that implements it. The subject matter is not important -- it's an interview question, not a real world requirement. –  Greg Beech Jun 8 '09 at 19:25
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The use of hungarian notation should be punished with death.

That should be controversial enough ;)

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Nope, not controversial enough. Let them rewrite the complete works of shakespear in hungarian notation: a verb prefixed with v, a noun prefixed with n etc. –  Toon Krijthe Jan 2 '09 at 13:55
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eh i dunno, i like it for some objects, like textbox = txtFirstName, etc –  Shawn Jan 2 '09 at 16:45
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joelonsoftware.com/articles/Wrong.html –  Ikke Jan 2 '09 at 17:01
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I simply disagree. You clearly can go overboard board with it, but in C for example, the lack of a using a preceding "p" on a pointer should in and of itself be punishable by death. –  Tall Jeff Jan 3 '09 at 21:39
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+1, although with reservations: IMHO full blown Hungarian obscures code readability but use of some basic rules - such as p for pointers, does quite the reverse. It's a question of balance –  Cruachan Jan 3 '09 at 23:13
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Design patterns are hurting good design more than they're helping it.

IMO software design, especially good software design is far too varied to be meaningfully captured in patterns, especially in the small number of patterns people can actually remember - and they're far too abstract for people to really remember more than a handful. So they're not helping much.

And on the other hand, far too many people become enamoured with the concept and try to apply patterns everywhere - usually, in the resulting code you can't find the actual design between all the (completely meaningless) Singletons and Abstract Factories.

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Amen. One more damage done by Smalltalkers, together with "extreme programming" –  Nemanja Trifunovic Jan 2 '09 at 17:43
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Design Patterns fail not because they are meaningless or far too varied. Design patterns fail because people make the arrogant mistake of equating idioms in their insular little language fiefdoms with grand ontologies that describe and explain the Universe. –  dreftymac Jan 3 '09 at 5:07
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A design pattern is simply a commonly accepted solution to a given problem. Your prejudice is against their perception and use, not the patterns themselves. Would you suggest civil engineers throw out trusses? –  Bryan Watts Jan 4 '09 at 2:56
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+100. I've had many co-workers, when asked "how are you going to do X", reply with "Oh, I'm going to use the Visitor pattern" or whatever, as if that was an actual answer to my question. –  MusiGenesis Jan 13 '09 at 16:59
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Disagree: Patterns are all about communication of intent. The exact implementation detail isn't why you use a pattern; telling maintenance programmers the intent of your thinking in a concise manner is. –  Scott Stanchfield Mar 9 '09 at 11:42
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Less code is better than more!

If the users say "that's it?", and your work remains invisible, it's done right. Glory can be found elsewhere.

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I dissagree, readability is crucial and if you take myMethod(mVar++) / myMethod(++myVar) vs myVar++; myMethod(myVar). Give me the latter it's clearer and more readable. If less code is better do you name all variables i,j,k etc... –  JoshBerke Jan 13 '09 at 16:13
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Good point, and since your point is a variant of Hemingway's approach to writing, very appropriately written. –  MusiGenesis Jan 13 '09 at 17:06
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What I meant is coding things as simply and clearly as possible, but no simpler. Sometimes more lines of code are created in trying to break down a process. More lines of code = more bugs = more debugging. The cost of maintaining each line of code gets to be exponential. –  Jas Panesar Jan 13 '09 at 17:39
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"Perfection is attained not when you have nothing left to add, but when there is nothing left to take away" --Antoine de Saint-Exupery –  TokenMacGuy Jan 31 '09 at 2:38
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This does not seem very controversial to me. –  Richard Mar 1 '09 at 12:25
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PHP sucks ;-)

The proof is in the pudding.

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php sucks! justification? just use it for a while. it SUCKS!!!!1111 +10 (I wish hehe) –  hasenj Jan 3 '09 at 2:00
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Justification? How about the complete inability to find out that you typoed a variable name at compile time (well, syntax-check time, with PHP) instead of runtime? Even Perl has 'use strict', and Perl catches so much flak it's barely funny. –  chaos Jan 5 '09 at 0:15
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I thought these opinions were supposed to be controversial? PHP sucks seems more like a statement of fact :-). –  Travis Apr 9 '09 at 0:10
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PHP sucks, but it's still a good language. If you don't understand that statement, or don't agree with it, you haven't been writing PHP long enough. –  notJim May 8 '09 at 1:31
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I use PHP! You can be as productive as you want and write great code in PHP. Its possible. Really. However, it lacks cohesiveness and elegance for a language that I would enjoy on day to day use. So to generalize, I use it every day, and IT SUCKS! –  Nick Zalutskiy May 8 '09 at 2:18
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Unit Testing won't help you write good code

The only reason to have Unit tests is to make sure that code that already works doesn't break. Writing tests first, or writing code to the tests is ridiculous. If you write to the tests before the code, you won't even know what the edge cases are. You could have code that passes the tests but still fails in unforeseen circumstances.

And furthermore, good developers will keep cohesion low, which will make the addition of new code unlikely to cause problems with existing stuff.

In fact, I'll generalize that even further,

Most "Best Practices" in Software Engineering are there to keep bad programmers from doing too much damage.

They're there to hand-hold bad developers and keep them from making dumbass mistakes. Of course, since most developers are bad, this is a good thing, but good developers should get a pass.

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+1 - I think your further generalization sums up my opinion very well –  Greg Beech Jan 2 '09 at 15:19
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Although I agree with your second statement ( the first I'm not sure about ) who judges who the good developers are? Many of the smartest programmers I know will often make dumb mistakes out of pure arrogance because they believe themselves to be such good developers. –  glenatron Jan 2 '09 at 15:22
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I have to point out that NOT Unit Testing won't help you write good code, either. Writing the tests first does force you to think differently about your API, which can arguably make your code better. If you don't know what tests to write, then you don't know what code to write either. –  Bill the Lizard Jan 3 '09 at 3:07
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unit tests are invaluable for regression testing - e.g. to make sure your refactoring change didn't break anything else –  kpollock Jan 12 '09 at 16:05
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I think you missed the point. Unit tests for libraries serve as the most concise and correct documentation for the library in existance. Treat it as documentation - cause that's what it is. –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Feb 2 '09 at 10:33
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Write small methods. It seems that programmers love to write loooong methods where they do multiple different things.

I think that a method should be created wherever you can name one.

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Agree, but not too controversial? –  Ed Guiness Jan 2 '09 at 14:07
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I had an office-mate who practice this and his code used to drive me nuts. Nothing ever got done where I expected it: it was its own form of "spaghetti code." Also, research has shown that longer methods do not produce more bugs. With that said, each method should do 1 task: longer isn't better. –  Mark Brittingham Jan 2 '09 at 15:24
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AKA: Your method should only do one thing, and only one. –  thenonhacker Jan 6 '09 at 7:06
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When you've got a sequential set of tasks in a function. Break them up into paragraphs by wrapping them in some scopes { }. This at least maintains the order of the function. –  Scott Langham Jan 29 '09 at 15:32
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Not sure about this one. I've seen long, well-documented methods that really do a lot in a clean way. I'd rather just follow line-by-line than jump all over the place trying to understand why the developer made 30 methods to do a task with a single path. However, a method should never repeat itself, that's where a loop or a private method should make an appearance. –  User1 Sep 15 '09 at 20:51
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It's ok to write garbage code once in a while

Sometimes a quick and dirty piece of garbage code is all that is needed to fulfill a particular task. Patterns, ORMs, SRP, whatever... Throw up a Console or Web App, write some inline sql ( feels good ), and blast out the requirement.

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i've seen advice on SO before stating that you should never code for "throw-away" apps because one day they may become business critical. but generally, that doesn't happen overnight. once you start extending it & depending on it, obviously refactor it, but until then, just make sure it works –  brad.lane Jan 2 '09 at 16:56
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I would add that if you're adding "garbage code" to a non-garbage app, do it in a way that won't pollute the rest of the app. Encapsulation is especially important for hackish code. –  JW. Jan 2 '09 at 17:57
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Sometimes you really do know when somethings garbage code. Those one-time exports or imports are perfect examples. –  Brian Bolton Feb 7 '09 at 0:25
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I usually work from home and when my kids were a little younger they would look at the screen and say "Dad's doing his garbage writing best keep quiet" The name stuck so when coding I'm still referred to as doing "Garbage writing". Always made me laugh! –  Despatcher Jun 19 '09 at 10:22
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I don't think this is ever true. If you write junk code there's no reason for writing it in the first place other than maybe a client with a deadline that needs booked. –  leeand00 Oct 13 '09 at 20:13
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Code == Design

I'm no fan of sophisticated UML diagrams and endless code documentation. In a high level language, your code should be readable and understandable as is. Complex documentation and diagrams aren't really any more user friendly.


Here's an article on the topic of Code as Design.

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There's a difference between "hey, check out this UML, see any issues with the architecture?" and "hey, check out my code, see any issues with the architecture?" Humans aren't particularly good at parsing code; they're good at parsing images, though. –  LKM Jan 10 '09 at 13:01
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UML is always insufficient to describe in detail the problem at hand - if it wasn't, we wouldn't have programming languages. It is at best a formalized sort of handwaving. –  Kris Nuttycombe Mar 30 '09 at 17:07
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UML and code are meant for different purposes, and it is not really reasonable to use one in lieu of the other. –  Kwang Mark Eleven Jun 11 '09 at 23:32
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+1 for Controversy, but you are 110% wrong. Cowboy coding ftl. –  Kyle Rozendo Sep 29 '09 at 7:42
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Show me your flowcharts and conceal your tables, and I shall continue to be mystified. Show me your tables, and I won’t usually need your flowcharts; they’ll be obvious. ― Frederick Brooks, in The Mythical Man‐Month, p. 102. –  Teddy Oct 18 '09 at 6:32
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Software development is just a job

Don't get me wrong, I enjoy software development a lot. I've written a blog for the last few years on the subject. I've spent enough time on here to have >5000 reputation points. And I work in a start-up doing typically 60 hour weeks for much less money than I could get as a contractor because the team is fantastic and the work is interesting.

But in the grand scheme of things, it is just a job.

It ranks in importance below many things such as family, my girlfriend, friends, happiness etc., and below other things I'd rather be doing if I had an unlimited supply of cash such as riding motorbikes, sailing yachts, or snowboarding.

I think sometimes a lot of developers forget that developing is just something that allows us to have the more important things in life (and to have them by doing something we enjoy) rather than being the end goal in itself.

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Tell musicians their music is just a job. –  icelava Jan 7 '09 at 13:24
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@icelava: I know some musicians (classical music, bass and violin) to whom it is exactly that: Just a job. –  Treb Jan 22 '09 at 9:28
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Programmers who overvalue programming overvalue themselves. –  Diego Deberdt Jan 26 '09 at 8:03
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This is something that applies to you. You assume that it automatically applies to everyone. I consider friends and family very important indeed, but I consider doing what I was born to do just as important. I cannot under any circumstance neglect either of them. –  Lucas Lindström May 5 '09 at 20:54
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I didn't assume anything. It's my opinion. You're free to disagree. –  Greg Beech May 5 '09 at 22:20
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I also think there's nothing wrong with having binaries in source control.. if there is a good reason for it. If I have an assembly I don't have the source for, and might not necessarily be in the same place on each devs machine, then I will usually stick it in a "binaries" directory and reference it in a project using a relative path.

Quite a lot of people seem to think I should be burned at the stake for even mentioning "source control" and "binary" in the same sentence. I even know of places that have strict rules saying you can't add them.

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I think it's more common to have "no generated binaries" - i.e. build X should build its in-house dependencies, rather than relying on the results of a previous build being checked in. There are pros and cons here. –  Jon Skeet Jan 2 '09 at 14:32
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Sure, I agree that generated binaries are pretty much a nono, and I think that's where people get the seed of the idea from that unfortunately mutates into "no binaries in source control". –  Steven Robbins Jan 2 '09 at 14:34
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Another good solid idea which got corrupted through thoughtless application. When people spout rules without being able to explain the justification you know it's a bad time for everyone. –  duncan Jan 3 '09 at 12:59
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Every developer should be familiar with the basic architecture of modern computers. This also applies to developers who target a virtual machine (maybe even more so, because they have been told time and time again that they don't need to worry themselves with memory management etc.)

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agree, and add a real, solid low-level language; just to get some 'feeling' about that architecture. C is good for this –  Javier Jan 2 '09 at 14:18
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As soon as you say "every" that should be a hint that something is wrong with a statement. –  Gene Roberts Jan 2 '09 at 15:02
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I'd change this to say every developer should understand, at a basic level, how any platform they utilize should work, wether it's the hardware, or the software. I've seen too many using tools like ajax, ado.net, asp.net and not really understand what's happening under the hood. –  Jeremy Jan 3 '09 at 21:14
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@PhoenixRedeemer: So "every developer should be competent" is wrong too? –  jalf Jan 13 '10 at 11:51
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"Every" time someone focuses on some detail about the word choice of a sentence rather than on it's implied idea, they should be punished. –  Nick Jul 24 '10 at 3:21
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Software Architects/Designers are Overrated

As a developer, I hate the idea of Software Architects. They are basically people that no longer code full time, read magazines and articles, and then tell you how to design software. Only people that actually write software full time for a living should be doing that. I don't care if you were the worlds best coder 5 years ago before you became an Architect, your opinion is useless to me.

How's that for controversial?

Edit (to clarify): I think most Software Architects make great Business Analysts (talking with customers, writing requirements, tests, etc), I simply think they have no place in designing software, high level or otherwise.

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I think there's a big necessary difference between architecting software and coding. What you say might apply to simple applications but there are many scenarios involving multi components spread across several servers, that requires archtecting, THEN coding. –  Jeremy Jan 5 '09 at 3:01
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@Jeremy I don't deny that things need designing, just that the design should be done by programmers, not Software Architects. –  rustyshelf Jan 5 '09 at 7:46
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I think that software architecture is just one of the responsibilities of the Software Developer. If you want to have a person with the title 'Software Architect' fine. But he is just the software developer that happens to be officially accountable for the architecture quality. –  Sergio Acosta Mar 11 '09 at 8:44
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In agreement with many other comments here, I'll say this: to be a REAL Architect, you must be an excellent coder (among other things). –  Charlie Flowers Mar 23 '09 at 1:11
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If you ever have to spend a year rewriting an entire application that was written by programmers with no architecture, you'd likely change your tune. –  ctacke Apr 13 '09 at 14:46
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There is no "one size fits all" approach to development

I'm surprised that this is a controversial opinion, because it seems to me like common sense. However, there are many entries on popular blogs promoting the "one size fits all" approach to development so I think I may actually be in the minority.

Things I've seen being touted as the correct approach for any project - before any information is known about it - are things like the use of Test Driven Development (TDD), Domain Driven Design (DDD), Object-Relational Mapping (ORM), Agile (capital A), Object Orientation (OO), etc. etc. encompassing everything from methodologies to architectures to components. All with nice marketable acronyms, of course.

People even seem to go as far as putting badges on their blogs such as "I'm Test Driven" or similar, as if their strict adherence to a single approach whatever the details of the project project is actually a good thing.

It isn't.

Choosing the correct methodologies and architectures and components, etc., is something that should be done on a per-project basis, and depends not only on the type of project you're working on and its unique requirements, but also the size and ability of the team you're working with.

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Hurray for common sense! Having started life as an engineer, I'm often baffled by the "religious" tone of this field. –  Mike Dunlavey Jan 2 '09 at 15:13
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There is no silver bullet! quoting F.Brooks –  epatel Jan 2 '09 at 19:04
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Five worlds man. 1. Shrinkwrap 2. Internal 3. Embedded 4. Games 5. Throwaway www.joelonsoftware.com/articles/FiveWorlds.html –  MarkJ Jan 27 '09 at 11:29
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