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Hey guys, I am looking for an example code written in C# that performs a sum of two 32 bits integers by using only bitwise operations OR, AND, XOR, NOT, shift left and shift right.

Plus, is it possible to do this without using things like ifs, elses, loops etc?

I searched over the internet but wasn't able find it (actually I could find some big c++ codes and some not-working codes). Anyway, it's a curiosity that I have, just want to look at the code and try to understand the logic behind this, with a little help of my friend google of course.

Also, it would be nice if you could link me to some good resources about this subject.

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Out of curiosity, why do you want to do such a thing? –  Oded Nov 1 '10 at 10:18
    
University assignment? –  Aliostad Nov 1 '10 at 10:19
    
Schoolwork :). ! –  Younes Nov 1 '10 at 10:20
    
According to him self, he just wants to understand the logic behind adding binary numbers. –  Arkain Nov 1 '10 at 10:23
    
Nothing special, just for the knowledge. I'm not in the university yet :( –  Delta Nov 1 '10 at 10:24
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6 Answers

up vote 26 down vote accepted

Here is an example for your amusement

unsigned int myAdd(unsigned int a, unsigned int b)
{
    unsigned int carry = a & b;
    unsigned int result = a ^ b;
    while(carry != 0)
    {
        unsigned int shiftedcarry = carry << 1;
        carry = result & shiftedcarry;
        result ^= shiftedcarry;
    }
    return result;
}

The loop could be unrolled. Number of times it executes, depends on the number of bits set in operands, but it's never greater than the width of unsigned int. Once carry becomes 0, next iterations don't change anything.

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Thank you. That's what I was looking for. Now I'm gonna try to understand why this works. ty –  Delta Nov 1 '10 at 14:35
    
A concise solution that works. +1 to that. –  primo Oct 31 '12 at 7:58
    
Can anyone produce a concise proof why a version without a loop or recursion isn't possible for arbitrary representation size? –  nietaki Mar 31 '13 at 14:38
    
I will point out that this should work in modern Fortran as well, since there is no unsigned integer type. One can simply use a normal integer and this procedure to guarantee unsigned integer addition modulo 2^w where w is the number of bits in your integer model. Usually integers are two's compliment in Fortran, so the bits will represent unsigned integers but if you print the value of your integer it will interpret the bits as a signed two's compliment integer. If you want to use large integers and verify that your addition works & is modulo 2^w be careful interpreting the results. –  zbeekman May 23 '13 at 19:05
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Take a look at how adders are implemented in hardware and you'll be able to do the same in software with bitwise operators.

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Think about how addition happens bit by bit. Shift the values to get each bit of each operand in turn, then look at the four possible values for the two bits and work out what the result bit should be and whether there's a carry bit to worry about. Then see how the result and carry can be caculated using the bitwise ops.

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public static int getSum(int p, int q)
{
    int carry=0, result =0;
    for(int i=0; i<32; i++)
    {
        int n1 = (p & (1<<(i)))>>(i); //find the nth bit of p
        int n2 = (q & (1<<(i)))>>(i); //find the nth bit of q

        int s = n1 ^ n2 ^ carry; //sum of bits
        carry = (carry==0) ? (n1&n2): (n1 | n2); //calculate the carry for next step
        result = result | (s<<(i)); //calculate resultant bit
    }

    return result;
}

Taking 32 bit as int takes 32 bit. Thanks!!!

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1  
i++ is that not addition? ;) –  Qantas 94 Heavy Feb 1 at 1:55
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if you're interested in this sort of thing, check out a book called Hacker's Delight

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1  
While this link may answer the question, it is better to include the essential parts of the answer here and provide the link for reference. Link-only answers can become invalid if the linked page changes. –  hoaz Jan 31 at 9:59
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        int  b =  25;
        for (int t = 128; t > 0; t = t / 2)
        {
            if ((b & t) != 0) Console.Write("1 ");
            if ((b & t) == 0) Console.Write("0 ");
        }
        Console.WriteLine();
        //b = (sbyte)~b;
        int e = 22;
        for (int t = 128; t > 0; t = t / 2)
        {
            if ((e & t) != 0) Console.Write("1 ");
            if ((e & t) == 0) Console.Write("0 ");
        }
        Console.WriteLine();
        int c = b | e;
        for (int t = 128; t > 0; t = t / 2)
        {
            if ((c & t) != 0) Console.Write("1 ");
            if ((c & t) == 0) Console.Write("0 ");
        }
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2  
-1 code provided is just "int c = b | e" which is OR, not ADD. The rest of code is just bad example of converting int to binary string. –  peenut Aug 20 '13 at 17:28
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