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Which is the right way to call base class move ctor?

this (works in MSVC2010, but not in CBuilder2010):

struct Foo
{
    Foo(Foo&& other) { }
};

struct Bar : public Foo
{
    Bar(Bar&& other) : Foo((Foo&&)other) { }
};

or (works in CBuilder2010, but not in MSVC2010):

struct Foo
{
    Foo(Foo&& other) { }
};

struct Bar : public Foo
{
    Bar(Bar&& other) : Foo(&other) { }
};

or, are they both wrong? If so, what's the right way (in terms of what's specified in the C++0x standards)?

Note: I can't figure out how to get it to work in CBuilderXE (both versions don't work).

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Foo(&other) shouldn't compile, unless Foo has a ctor which takes a Foo pointer. –  Roger Pate Nov 1 '10 at 13:25
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The first option looks logical although I would spell it std::forward<Bar>(other).

I have no idea what causes CBuilder to think that the type of &other is Bar&& and not Bar*.

Basically what's happening here is that once an rvalue reference is named it is no longer an rvalue reference, that's what std::forward is for, it maintains the rvaluness (to coin a phrase), so when you call : Foo(other) you're calling the copy constructor rather than the move constructor.

This should be the idiomatic (and standard compliant) way to achieve what you're trying to do (unless I'm badly misunderstanding the FCD).

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What does it say in the standards though? My question is, which one is the correct one per C++0x standards as it is at the moment. –  Zach Saw Nov 1 '10 at 11:53
    
Apparently with CBuilderXE, std::forward<Bar>(other) works but (Foo&&) doesn't. Looks like another compiler bug (which isn't surprising). –  Zach Saw Nov 1 '10 at 12:07
    
@Zach I've expanded my answer a bit to answer your questions. –  Motti Nov 1 '10 at 12:18
1  
Wouldn't std::move also work here (perhaps being more explicit about what you actually want to achieve)? –  visitor Nov 1 '10 at 13:36
    
@visitor, std::move would work here but IMO std::forward is safer since it maintains the rvalueness of the param. This makes it more robust in case it gets copy/pasted to a location where other is a lvalue reference. –  Motti Nov 1 '10 at 14:35
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The first option is the correct one in terms of the Standard- except that you shouldn't have to cast it and you should forward it. std::forward<Bar>(other) is the correct way- else, you are invoking the copy constructor when you want to invoke the move constructor.

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The first option causes MSVC++2010 to invoke the move c'tor of the base class. From what I can tell, std::foward<Bar>(other) in this case is the same as static_cast<Bar&&>(other). Yes, if you don't cast it (which is essentially what std::forward does in this case), you'll end up with the copy c'tor. –  Zach Saw Nov 1 '10 at 12:19
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