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I'm trying to run two AsyncTasks at the same time. (Platform is Android 1.5, HTC Hero.) However, only the first gets executed. Here's a simple snippet to describe my problem:

public class AndroidJunk extends Activity {
 class PrinterTask extends AsyncTask<String, Void, Void> {
     protected Void doInBackground(String ... x) {
      while (true) {
       System.out.println(x[0]);
       try {
        Thread.sleep(1000);
       } catch (InterruptedException ie) {
        ie.printStackTrace();
       }
      }
        }
    };

    @Override
    public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
        super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
        setContentView(R.layout.main);

        new PrinterTask().execute("bar bar bar");
        new PrinterTask().execute("foo foo foo");

        System.out.println("onCreate() is done.");
    }
}

The output I expect is:

onCreate() is done.
bar bar bar
foo foo foo
bar bar bar
foo foo foo

And so on. However, what I get is:

onCreate() is done.
bar bar bar
bar bar bar
bar bar bar

The second AsyncTask never gets executed. If I change the order of the execute() statements, only the foo task will produce output.

Am I missing something obvious here and/or doing something stupid? Is it not possible to run two AsyncTasks at the same time?

Edit: I realized the phone in question runs Android 1.5, I updated the problem descr. accordingly. I don't have this problem with an HTC Hero running Android 2.1. Hmmm ...

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Your code works for me, so the problem has to be somewhere else. Did you enter a filter in your LogCat view? ;-) –  mreichelt Nov 1 '10 at 13:29
    
Hm, that's odd. I don't have any filtering in logcat. Are you using 1.6 as well? If so, which phone? –  rodion Nov 1 '10 at 13:34
    
Oops, just realized it's running (ancient) Android 1.5 –  rodion Nov 1 '10 at 13:36
1  
I used Android 1.6 as the target and an Android 2.1 emulator. So if the problem really occurs on a HTC Hero with Android 1.5 only - screw them, you're fine. ;-) HTC Hero already has the update to a newer Android version. I wouldn't bother about it if there are some manufacturers which screw things up. In addition I wouldn't mind about Android 1.5 any more. –  mreichelt Nov 1 '10 at 13:48

6 Answers 6

up vote 196 down vote accepted

AsyncTask uses a thread pool pattern for running the stuff from doInBackground(). The issue is initially (in early Android OS versions) the pool size was just 1, meaning no parallel computations for a bunch of AsyncTasks. But later they fixed that and now the size is 5, so at most 5 AsyncTasks can run simultaneously. Unfortunately I don't remember in what version exactly they changed that.

UPDATE:

Here is what current (2012-01-27) API says on this:

When first introduced, AsyncTasks were executed serially on a single background thread. Starting with DONUT, this was changed to a pool of threads allowing multiple tasks to operate in parallel. After HONEYCOMB, it is planned to change this back to a single thread to avoid common application errors caused by parallel execution. If you truly want parallel execution, you can use the executeOnExecutor(Executor, Params...) version of this method with THREAD_POOL_EXECUTOR; however, see commentary there for warnings on its use.

DONUT is Android 1.6, HONEYCOMB is Android 3.0.

UPDATE: 2

See the comment by kabuko from Mar 7 at 1:27.

It turns out that for APIs where "a pool of threads allowing multiple tasks to operate in parallel" is used (starting from 1.6 and ending on 3.0) the number of simultaneously running AsyncTasks depens on how many tasks have been passed for execution already, but have not finished their doInBackground() yet.

This is tested/confirmed by me on 2.2. Suppose you have a custom AsyncTask that just sleeps a second in doInBackground(). AsyncTasks use a fixed size queue internally for storing delayed tasks. Queue size is 10 by default. If you start 15 your custom tasks in a row, then first 5 will enter their doInBackground(), but the rest will wait in a queue for a free worker thread. As soon as any of the first 5 finishes, and thus releases a worker thread, a task from the queue will start execution. So in this case at most 5 tasks will run simultaneously. However if you start 16 your custom tasks in a row, then first 5 will enter their doInBackground(), the rest 10 will get into the queue, but for the 16th a new worker thread will be created so it'll start execution immediatelly. So in this case at most 6 tasks will run simultaneously.

There is a limit of how many tasks can be run simultaneously. Since AsyncTask uses a thread pool executor with limited max number of worker threads (128) and the delayed tasks queue has fixed size 10, if you try to execute more than 138 your custom tasks the app will crash with java.util.concurrent.RejectedExecutionException.

Starting from 3.0 the API allows to use your custom thread pool executor via AsyncTask.executeOnExecutor(Executor exec, Params... params) method. This allows, for instance, to configure the size of the delayed tasks queue if default 10 is not what you need.

UPDATE: 3

Here is a simple test app to play with number of tasks, serial vs. parallel execution: https://github.com/vitkhudenko/test_asynctask

UPDATE: 4 (thanks @penkzhou for pointing this out)

Starting from Android 4.4 AsyncTask behaves differently from what was described in UPDATE: 2 section. There is a fix to prevent AsyncTask from creating too many threads.

Before Android 4.4 (API 19) AsyncTask had the following fields:

private static final int CORE_POOL_SIZE = 5;
private static final int MAXIMUM_POOL_SIZE = 128;
private static final BlockingQueue<Runnable> sPoolWorkQueue =
        new LinkedBlockingQueue<Runnable>(10);

In Android 4.4 (API 19) the above fields are changed to this:

private static final int CPU_COUNT = Runtime.getRuntime().availableProcessors();
private static final int CORE_POOL_SIZE = CPU_COUNT + 1;
private static final int MAXIMUM_POOL_SIZE = CPU_COUNT * 2 + 1;
private static final BlockingQueue<Runnable> sPoolWorkQueue =
        new LinkedBlockingQueue<Runnable>(128);

This change increases the size of the queue to 128 items and reduces the maximum number of threads to the number of CPU cores * 2 + 1. Apps can still submit the same number of tasks.

share|improve this answer
    
This explains the behavior. When I use Threads and a handler to pass results to the UI, it works fine. –  rodion Nov 2 '10 at 15:01
    
Thank you for the recent update. –  Artyom Feb 3 '12 at 15:59
7  
Just FYI, core pool size is 5, but max is 128. This means that if you fill up your queue, more than 5 (up to 128) can run simultaneously. –  kabuko Mar 7 '12 at 1:27
    
@kabuko: you're absolutely right. Just investigated this on 2.2 and confirming that if 5 tasks already running (core pool size is 5), then it starts putting the rest of tasks into the queue of delayed tasks, however if the queue is already full (the max queue size is 10), then it starts an additional worker thread for the task so the task starts immediatelly. –  Arhimed Mar 10 '12 at 21:46
2  
Wow...this is one of the finest explanations I've read. Thnx.. –  Nitin Bansal Aug 14 '12 at 3:11

This allows for parallel execution on all android versions with API 4+ (Android 1.6+):

@TargetApi(Build.VERSION_CODES.HONEYCOMB) // API 11
void startMyTask(AsyncTask asyncTask) {
    if(Build.VERSION.SDK_INT >= Build.VERSION_CODES.HONEYCOMB)
        asyncTask.executeOnExecutor(AsyncTask.THREAD_POOL_EXECUTOR, params);
    else
        asyncTask.execute(params);
}

This is a summary of Arhimed's excellent answer.

Please make sure you use API level 11 or higher as your project build target. In Eclipse, that is Project > Properties > Android > Project Build Target. This will not break backward compatibility to lower API levels. Don't worry, you will get Lint errors if your accidentally use features introduced later than minSdkVersion. If you really want to use features introduced later than minSdkVersion, you can suppress those errors using annotations, but in that case, you need take care about compatibility yourself. This is exactly what happened in the code snippet above.

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2  
Had to change the TimerTask.THREAD_POOL_EXECUTOR to AsynTask.THREAD_POOL_EXECUTOR then this example works –  Ronnie Mar 13 '13 at 16:00
    
Thank you for pointing this out, I corrected the answer :) –  sulai Mar 14 '13 at 10:44
2  
To void issues you can make the call generic: void startMyTask(AsyncTask<Void, ?, ?> asyncTask) (if your doInBackground takes Void) –  Peter Mar 28 '13 at 15:17
    
You can simplify the above code even more if your class extends AsyncTask<Void, Integer, Void>. It worked great sulai, thanks. –  Peter Arandorenko Jan 26 at 5:06
    
Thanks a lot. I had a scenario where I need to execute two async tasks simultaneously to read data from the web server, but I found the server receives only one URL and as long as that particular request is not completed, the second AsyncTask's url will not hit the server. Your answer solved my issue :) –  Santhosh Gutta Jun 5 at 20:51

Making @sulai suggestion more generic :

@TargetApi(Build.VERSION_CODES.HONEYCOMB) // API 11
public static <T> void executeAsyncTask(AsyncTask<T, ?, ?> asyncTask, T... params) {
    if(Build.VERSION.SDK_INT >= Build.VERSION_CODES.HONEYCOMB)
        asyncTask.executeOnExecutor(AsyncTask.THREAD_POOL_EXECUTOR, params);
    else
        asyncTask.execute(params);
}   
share|improve this answer

The android developers example of loading bitmaps efficiently uses a custom asynctask (copied from jellybean) so you can use the executeOnExecutor in apis lower than < 11

http://developer.android.com/training/displaying-bitmaps/index.html

Download the code and go to util package.

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It is posible. My android device version is 4.0.4 and android.os.Build.VERSION.SDK_INT is 15

I have 3 spinners

Spinner c_fruit=(Spinner) findViewById(R.id.fruits);
Spinner c_vegetable=(Spinner) findViewById(R.id.vegetables);
Spinner c_beverage=(Spinner) findViewById(R.id.beverages);

And also I have a Async-Tack class.

Here is my spinner loading code

RequestSend reqs_fruit = new RequestSend(this);
reqs_fruit.where="Get_fruit_List";
reqs_fruit.title="Loading fruit";
reqs_fruit.execute();

RequestSend reqs_vegetable = new RequestSend(this);
reqs_vegetable.where="Get_vegetable_List";
reqs_vegetable.title="Loading vegetable";
reqs_vegetable.execute();

RequestSend reqs_beverage = new RequestSend(this);
reqs_beverage.where="Get_beverage_List";
reqs_beverage.title="Loading beverage";
reqs_beverage.execute();

This is working perfectly. One by one my spinners loaded. I didn't user executeOnExecutor.

Here is my Async-task class

public class RequestSend  extends AsyncTask<String, String, String > {
    private ProgressDialog dialog = null;
    public Spinner spin;
    public String where;
    public String title;
    Context con;
    Activity activity;

    String[] items;



    public RequestSend(Context activityContext) {
        con =activityContext;
        dialog = new ProgressDialog(activityContext);
        this.activity=activityContext;

    }


    @Override
    protected void onPostExecute(String result) {

        try 
        {
            ArrayAdapter<String> adapter = new ArrayAdapter<String> (activity, android.R.layout.simple_spinner_item, items);       
            adapter.setDropDownViewResource(android.R.layout.simple_spinner_dropdown_item);
            spin.setAdapter(adapter);
        } 
        catch (NullPointerException e) {
            Toast.makeText(activity, "Can not load list. Check your connection", Toast.LENGTH_LONG).show();
            e.printStackTrace();
        } 
        catch (Exception e) 
        {
            Toast.makeText(activity, "Can not load list. Check your connection", Toast.LENGTH_LONG).show();
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
        super.onPostExecute(result);



        if (dialog != null)
        dialog.dismiss();   

    }


    protected void onPreExecute() {
        super.onPreExecute();
        dialog.setTitle(title);
        dialog.setMessage("Wait...");
        dialog.setCancelable(false); 
        dialog.show();
    }

    @Override
    protected String doInBackground(String... Strings) {
        try {
            Send_Request();

            } catch (NullPointerException e) {

            e.printStackTrace();
            } catch (Exception e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
        return null;
    }



    public void Send_Request() throws JSONException
    {

        try{

            String DataSendingTo="http://www.mysite.com/AppRequest/"+where;
            //HttpClient
            HttpClient httpClient = new DefaultHttpClient();
            //Post header
            HttpPost httpPost = new HttpPost(DataSendingTo);
            //Adding data
            List<NameValuePair> nameValuePairs = new ArrayList<NameValuePair>(2);

            nameValuePairs.add(new BasicNameValuePair("authorized","001"));

            httpPost.setEntity(new UrlEncodedFormEntity(nameValuePairs));
            // execute HTTP post request
            HttpResponse response = httpClient.execute(httpPost);

            BufferedReader reader;
            try 
            {
                reader = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(response.getEntity().getContent()));

                StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder();

                String line = null;

                while ((line = reader.readLine()) != null) 
                {
                    builder.append(line) ;
                }


                JSONTokener tokener = new JSONTokener(builder.toString());
                JSONArray finalResult = new JSONArray(tokener);

                 items = new String[finalResult.length()]; 

                // looping through All details and store in public String array
                for(int i = 0; i < finalResult.length(); i++)
                {
                    JSONObject c = finalResult.getJSONObject(i);
                    items[i]=c.getString("data_name");
                }

                } catch (ClientProtocolException e) {
                e.printStackTrace();

                } catch (IOException e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
            }


            } catch (ClientProtocolException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
            } catch (IOException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }



}
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The above code posted by Mr Sulai will NOT compile for API level 9 (Ginger Bread). If GingerBread supported is not needed. This should not be a problem.

I have resorted to use Thread instead of AsyncTask because I still need to support GingerBread.

Replacing an AsyncTask with Thread is not difficult except for the codes in onPostExecute(). Need to use Activity.RunOnUiThread() to achieve that.

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1  
The code in my answer does work for all API levels 4 and above. I updated my answer to show how to deal with target sdk. Using Thread and runOnUiThread is a valid way to do it, but in most cases, AsyncTasks are the better option. For a good discussion about Threads, AsyncTasks and Handlers, see stackoverflow.com/questions/6964011/…. –  sulai Feb 26 '13 at 12:56
    
Thanks for the link, I was just wondering why i cant call the handlers in the two classes. –  Dakota Miller Jun 25 '13 at 17:19

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