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I'd like to use Apache Pig to build a large key -> value mapping, look things up in the map, and iterate over the keys. However, there does not even seem to be syntax for doing these things; I've checked the manual, wiki, sample code, Elephant book, Google, and even tried parsing the parser source. Every single example loads map literals from a file... and then never uses them. How can you use Pig's maps?

First, there doesn't seem to be a way to load a 2-column CSV file into a map directly. If I have a simple map.csv:

1,2
3,4
5,6

And I try to load it as a map:

m = load 'map.csv' using PigStorage(',') as (M: []);
dump m;

I get three empty tuples:

()
()
()

So I try to load tuples and then generate the map:

m = load 'map.csv' using PigStorage(',') as (key:chararray, val:chararray);
b = foreach m generate [key#val];
ERROR 1000: Error during parsing. Encountered " "[" "[ "" at line 1, column 24.
...

Many variations on the syntax also fail (e.g., generate [$0#$1]).

OK, so I munge my map into Pig's map literal format as map.pig:

[1#2]
[3#4]
[5#6]

And load it up:

m = load 'map.pig' as (M: []);

Now let's load up some keys and try lookups:

k = load 'keys.csv' as (key);
dump k;
3
5
1

c = foreach k generate m#key;  /* Or m[key], or... what? */
ERROR 1000: Error during parsing.  Invalid alias: m in {M: map[ ]}

Hrm, OK, maybe since there are two relations involved, we need a join:

c = join k by key, m by /* ...um, what? */ $0;
dump c;
ERROR 1068: Using Map as key not supported.
c = join k by key, m by m#key;
dump c;
Error 1000: Error during parsing. Invalid alias: m in {M: map[ ]}

Fail. How do I refer to the key (or value) of a map? The map schema syntax doesn't seem to let you even name the key and value (the mailing list says there's no way to assign types).

Finally, I'd just like to be able to find all they keys in my map:

d = foreach m generate ...oh, forget it.

Is Pig's map type half-baked? What am I missing?

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3 Answers

Currently pig maps need the key to a chararray (string) that you supply and not a variable which contains a string. so in map#key the key has to be constant string that you supply (eg: map#'keyvalue').

The typical use case of this is to load a complex data structure one of the element being a key value pair and later in a foreach statement you can refer to a particular value based on the key you are interested in.

http://pig.apache.org/docs/r0.9.1/basic.html#map-schema

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In Pig version 0.10.0 there is a new function available called "TOMAP" (http://pig.apache.org/docs/r0.10.0/func.html#tomap) that converts its odd (chararray) parameters to keys and even parameters to values. Unfortunately I haven't found it to be that useful, though, since I typically deal with arbitrary dicts of varying lengths and keys.

I would find a TOMAP function that took a tuple as a single argument, instead of a variable number of parameters, to be much more useful.

This isn't a complete solution to your problem, but the availability of TOMAP gives you some more options for your constructing a real solution.

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I think you need to think in term of relations and the map is just one field of one record. Then you can apply some operations on the relations, like joining the two sets data and mapping:

Input

$ cat data.txt 
1
2
3
4
5
$ cat mapping.txt 
1   2
2   4
3   6
4   8
5   10

Pig

mapping = LOAD 'mapping.txt' AS (key:CHARARRAY, value:CHARARRAY);

data = LOAD 'data.txt' AS (value:CHARARRAY);


-- list keys
mapping_keys =
  FOREACH mapping
  GENERATE key;

DUMP mapping_keys;


-- join mapping to data
mapped_data =
  JOIN mapping BY key, data BY value;

DUMP mapped_data;

Output

> # keys
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
(5)

> # mapped data
(1,2,1)
(2,4,2)
(3,6,3)
(4,8,4)
(5,10,5)

This answer could also help you if you just want to do a simple look up: pass-a-relation-to-a-pig-udf-when-using-foreach-on-another-relation

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