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I’m trying to manage multiple models in a messaging based system. Each model might have values that are dependent on other models. For example:

   public class V2Model : BaseModel
   {
      private int mSomeVal;
      private byte mSomeByte;

      // …

      // Update mSomeByte based on multiple models values
      public void SetMultipleDependecyValue(int someIntFromModel1, short someShawteeyFromModel3)
      {
         mSomeByte = Convert.ToByte((someShawteeyFromModel3 / someIntFromModel1) + mSomeVal);
      }
   }

I would also like to use the MVC pattern, but instead of passing a Model instance, I thought I would pass in a ‘Repository’ instance. The ‘Repository’ instance would act as a manager for handling all the Model instances. The result would look something like this:

   public class V1Controller<ViewType, ModelType>
      where ViewType : IV1View
      where ModelType : BaseModel
   {
      ViewType mView;
      BaseRepository mBaseRep;

      public V1Controller(ViewType view, BaseRepository rep)
      {
         mView = view;
         mBaseRep = rep;
         mBaseRep.GetModel<ModelType>().PropertyChanged += new PropertyChangedEventHandler(V1ModelPropertyChanged);
      }

      void V1ModelPropertyChanged(object sender, PropertyChangedEventArgs e)
      {
         switch (e.PropertyName)
         {
            case "SomeVal":
               // Update the view
               int some_val = mBaseRep.GetModel<ModelType>().SomeVal;
               mView.HexSomeValue = some_val;
               // Oh BTW, we know V2Model's value depends on this... update it with V1Model and V3Model's values
               short some_short = mBaseRep.GetModel<V3Model>().SomeShawteey;
               mBaseRep.GetModel<V2Model>().SetMultipleDependecyValue(some_val, some_short);
               break;
         }
      }

      public void UpdateVal(int someValue)
      {
         mBaseRep.GetModel<ModelType>().SomeVal = someValue;
      }
   }

In this situation, if V1Model’s property changed, in V1ModelPropertyChanged, I would know the dependency on V2Model’s object, and update it with the appropriate values. Is there a better way of handling this interdependent model scheme, or would this be an acceptable solution? I am not really looking for anything 3rd party.

share|improve this question
    
Is it web or WPF/SL? –  Aliostad Nov 1 '10 at 14:19
    
It is Winforms. –  SwDevMan81 Nov 5 '10 at 15:29
2  
What ever happened to K.I.S.S. as a Design Pattern? Can you Abstractly Explain what you're trying to achieve without Code. Maybe there is a simplier solution than the one you have started with. –  SyntaxC4 Nov 6 '10 at 19:11
    
@SyntaxC4 - I don't think this example is that complex. My first two sentences explain what I'm trying to do... –  SwDevMan81 Nov 7 '10 at 14:01
2  
@SyntaxC4 Microsoft killed it years ago. –  Fergal Moran Nov 9 '10 at 15:39

2 Answers 2

If you want to handle this elegantly, you're going to need to have some component track the dependencies between the models. When a property changes, you would iterate over all of the dependencies for that property and then update them appropriately.

Perhaps your BaseRepository might hold a reference to a DependencyManager class. That class would have to have a list of all properties which depend on one another.

A simple implementation might look like this:

class PropertyDescriptor
{
    public Type ModelType { get; set; }
    public string Property { get; set; }
}

class DependencyManager
{
    private Dictionary<PropertyDescriptor, List<PropertyDescriptor>> _dependencies = new Dictionary<PropertyDescriptor, List<PropertyDescriptor>>();

    public void RegisterDependency(PropertyDescriptor property, PropertyDescriptor dependentProperty)
    {
        if (!_dependencies.ContainsKey(property))
        {
            _dependencies.Add(property, new List<PropertyDescriptor>());
        }
        _dependencies[property].Add(dependentProperty);
    }

    public IEnumerable<PropertyDescriptor> GetDependentProperties(PropertyDescriptor property)
    {
        if (!_dependencies.ContainsKey(property))
        {
            yield break;
        }
        else
        {
            foreach (PropertyDescriptor p in _dependencies[property])
            {
                yield return p;
            }
         }
     }
}

Then when you detect a property change, you can query the DependencyManager for what else needs to change. But be careful to check for circular dependencies when you cascade!

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the suggestion, this is definitely a possible solution. –  SwDevMan81 Nov 9 '10 at 20:32

Maybe I'm missing something, but isn't this what the observer pattern is for? If you set up the models as observers of each other (i.e., with delegates or events), then the controller should be able to remain blissfully ignorant of the dependencies.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 unless I'm missing something too...although I feel like in .NET using events/delegates would be more elegant. –  Christopher Pfohl Nov 10 '10 at 17:55
    
This would mean that every model gets notified about every single PropertyChanged event, even if they dont care about it. Imagine the scenario where a property changes in model1, that change notifies all models about the change, which changes a value in model2. That change in model2 then notifies all models, and on and on. Its not the most direct way. Im looking for a solution that says, hey this property just changed, this other model has a value that is calculated based on that value, go update it. –  SwDevMan81 Nov 10 '10 at 18:15
    
Generally you want that behavior, so that as your models grow over time they can decide what information they care about without the other models or controller having to change. Adding a new dependent field/property then means you only change one model/class instead of two (the model you're updating plus the model it depends on) or even three (the model you're updating, the model it depends on and the controller). –  Smashd Nov 10 '10 at 21:35
    
Also meant to say that if you use events and event handlers, the models really only get "notified" of changes they are interested in. For a given model you just create and register event handlers for events (property changes) that that model cares about. –  Smashd Nov 10 '10 at 22:08
    
It makes sense, but notification here is only half the issue. The other issue is being able to access the other models information. If I just hook up events via PropertyChanged, I only have the property name that changed, I dont have instances of each model unless I pass in the repository to each model, which I really dont want to do. –  SwDevMan81 Nov 11 '10 at 12:36

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