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I somehow found this webpage and was absolutely stunned by the navigation bar. www.webdesignerwall.com

When you put your mouse over "Home", "About" or "Jobs" menu options, you get that awesome rollover effect in the brown field above. I like that very much and had a similar idea, but being an amateur, I can't really say what type of programming is that. I would say it uses Ajax or JavaScript per se, but I'd like some of you to explain it to me, or even share some similar examples.

Thank you

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5  
You can solve this problem yourself by looking at the HTML of the site you mention –  smirkingman Nov 1 '10 at 14:37
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3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

This is done by CSS. It places an extra <span> into every <a> link element. With CSS <span>s are hidden and positioned correctly above the menu elements (absolute). When one of the link is hovered the new style applies to the correct <span> which makes it visible.

HTML

<ul id="nav"> 
  <li id="nav-home"><a href="/>Home<span></span></a></li> 
  <li id="nav-about"><a href="/about/">About<span></span></a></li> 
  <li id="nav-jobs"><a href="/jobs/">Jobs<span></span></a></li> 
</ul> 

CSS

#nav span {
 display: none;      /* hidden by default */
 position: absolute;
}

#nav a:hover span {  /* link:hover */
 display: block;     /* makes one of them visible */
}

#nav-home span {
 background: url(images/home-over.gif) no-repeat;
 width: 168px;   /* each has it's own image */
 height: 29px;   /* dimensions */
 top: -30px;     /* and coordinates */
 left: 35px;
}

#nav-about span {
 background: url(images/about-over.gif) no-repeat;
 width: 157px;
 height: 36px;
 top: -36px;
 left: 90px;
}
/* ... */
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5  
@apnerve - I don't think this is considered CSS sprites. Individual images are being used in their respective containers, which are being hidden and displayed. –  user113716 Nov 1 '10 at 14:41
1  
@apnerve - patrick is right. Css sprites is not the correct term here. –  galambalazs Nov 1 '10 at 14:43
    
Oops.. sorry. They are not sprites. –  apnerve Nov 2 '10 at 11:20
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This effect can also be accomplished with CSS without JavaScript:

CSS Image rollovers

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thank you, thats something I was looking for –  IWalkedAway Nov 1 '10 at 14:31
    
"This effect can also be accomplished with CSS without JavaScript" and so it is :) –  jensgram Nov 1 '10 at 14:55
    
@jensgram - I didn't actually look at their specific solution. The also was in reference to a post before mine that was deleted. I was only offering up possibilities. –  Joel Etherton Nov 1 '10 at 14:58
    
Yup, no worries, hence the smiley. –  jensgram Nov 1 '10 at 15:01
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It's just CSS.

Each link has an id attribute, and each id has its own CSS rule which changes the background of the nav bar on hover.

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