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private void ValidateName(string name) // maybe this method should take the Customer object instead?
{
    // validate
}
public void ValidateCustomer(Customer c)
{
    ValidateName(c.Name);
    // Other validations
}

Let's say that if Customer has customerType == CustomerTypes.Internal or something there is no need to validate the name.

Would you put the if statement in the ValidateName method or the ValidateCustomer method?

Edit: I'm talking about only a part of the validation. Not the whole validation.

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1  
Trumstedt: Your second question should be a separate question. It is completely unrelated to your first. – jason Nov 1 '10 at 15:24
1  
Note additionally that the standard naming convention for enum is to have the type be singular unless it is a [Flags] enum. Thus, public enum CustomerType, not public enum CustomerTypes. Note how CustomerType.Internal reads more clearly than CustomerTypes.Internal because Internal is a customer type, not customer types. – jason Nov 1 '10 at 15:46
    
@Jason OK, i'll remove it and post it seperatly later. Thanks for the note on the naming conventions as well. – KTrum Nov 1 '10 at 15:58
up vote 2 down vote accepted

If the validation has to do with the Customer, I would put it in ValidateCustomer.

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1  
+1 since the name of the ValidateName method gives no signal that it's tied to Customers. – Larsenal Nov 1 '10 at 15:13
    
Yeah, I guess it depends if the ValidateName is specifically to Customer or not! – KTrum Nov 1 '10 at 15:18
    
I disagree; I think a third method should be added since the logic of excluding certain types of customers is an expection that applies to the name only (based on the statement "there is no need to validate the name"). See stackoverflow.com/questions/4070111/…. – jason Nov 1 '10 at 15:45
    
@Jason - What if the OP cant change the interface. As others have already pointed out, at first, there was no implications that ValidateName had anything to do with Customers. The option to validate some Customer property in ValidateName might just not make sense. And I dont really need yet another link to your answer; not sure if your trying to get a badge or something... – SwDevMan81 Nov 1 '10 at 15:57
    
I guess it can be worth discussing both. If ValidateName can validate other entities names besides customers then clearly no check on customer type should be made there. The method is private so maybe that could indicate that it's related closly to the customer object. – KTrum Nov 1 '10 at 16:01

I'd put it in ValidateCustomer.

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In the ValidateCustomer -- the business rule is based on customer not on name.

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I would put it inside ValidateCustomer since that logic is part of the Customer validation process that will be applied to all Customers...not just the Name.

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He says "there is no need to validate the name", not there is no need to validate at all. – jason Nov 1 '10 at 15:12
1  
@Jason - True. But it's all part of the Customer validation that happens inside of ValidateCustomer. The ValidateName method doesn't know anything about the Customer (it's viable that you may want to call ValidateName for types other than Customer). – Justin Niessner Nov 1 '10 at 15:16
    
I partly agree which is why I gave the proposal that I did: stackoverflow.com/questions/4070111/… – jason Nov 1 '10 at 15:16

Would you put the if statement in the ValidateName method or the ValidateCustomer method?

I don't like the suggestions to put it in the ValidateCustomer method since it's an exception that applies to the name only. So, my answer to your question is "neither" and I would prefer the following:

private void ValidateCustomerName(Customer customer) {
    if(customer.CustomerType == CustomerType.Internal) {
        return;
    }
    ValidateName(customer.Name);
}

private void ValidateName(string name) {
    // do validation
}

public void ValidateCustomer(Customer customer) {
    ValidateCustomerName(customer);
    // rest of validation
}
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If you're going to downvote, please explain. – jason Nov 1 '10 at 16:24

Since you require access to the Customer type you can only put it in ValidateCustomer. If you put it in ValidateName you will need to change the interface to pass through the type information.

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Depends on whether the business logic is tied to names (no "internal" names need to be validated) or to customers (no internal customer names need to be validated). If you put it into ValidateName, you need to have some indication that the name is internal.

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